Family Violence data

There has been a lot of debate on violence since David Cunliffe released Labour’s anti-violence policy yesterday. Cunliffe started his speech by saying:

‘‘Can I begin by saying I’m sorry – I don’t often say it – I’m sorry for being a man, right now. Because family and sexual violence is perpetrated overwhelmingly by men against women and children,’’ he said.

Labour’s media release said:

Labour will take decisive and far-reaching action to address violence against women and children, says Labour Leader David Cunliffe.

Questions have been asked about why Cunliffe has apologised as a man and why Labour have solely targeted violence against women and children.

More men than women are more violent but aren’t solely responsible for violence. (It should be noted that violence outside of family violence is far more often male versus male).

Here is the latest data summary from the New Zealand Family Violence Clearing House.

Data Summaries 2013: Snapshot

This snapshot is drawn from the five NZFVC 2013 Data Summaries. Refer to the Data Summaries for definitions and caveats on the data below.

Family violence

  • In 2012, there were 87,622 family violence investigations by NZ Police. 101,293 children were linked to these investigations.[1]
  • In 2011, 4064 applications were made for protection orders:

-          2776 (91%) were made by women and 230 (8%) by men

-          2655 (88%) of respondents were men and 321 (11%) women.[2]

  • In 2011, there were 7896recorded male assaults female offences and 5232 recorded offences for breaching a protection order.2
  • In 2011/12, Women’s Refuges affiliated to the National Collective of Independent Women’s Refuges received 85,794 crisis calls. 8930 women and 7005 children accessed advocacy services in the community. 2273 women and 1424 children stayed in safe houses.[3]
  • 1 in 3 (35.4%) ever-partnered New Zealand women report having experienced physical and/or sexual IPV in their lifetime. When psychological/emotional abuse is included, 55% report having experienced IPV in their lifetime. In the 12 months prior to the survey, 5.2% had experiencedphysical and/or sexual IPV. When psychological/emotional abuse was included, 18.2% had experienced one or more forms of IPV.[4]
  • In 2011, NZ Police recorded 11 homicides by an intimate partner. 9 of the victims were women and 2 were men.[5]
  • 16.8% of New Zealand women report having experienced sexual violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime; 2% in the last 12 months.4
  • In 2011, there were 1,575 reported sexual offences against an adult over 16 years.1
  • In 2011/12, Child, Youth and Family received 152,800 reports of concern. 61,074 were deemed to require further action, leading to 21,525 findings of abuse or neglect. 3884 children were in care placements.[7]
  • In 2011, NZ Police recorded 12 homicides of children and young people under 20 by a family member.5 In 2011, 113 children and youth were hospitalised for a serious non-fatal assault perpetrated by a family member.[8]
  • Between 1 in 3[9] and 1 in 5[10] New Zealand women and 1 in 109 men report having experienced child sexual abuse. 1 in 5 female and 1 in 20 male secondary school students report having experienced unwanted sexual contact in the last 12 months.[11]
  • In 2011, there were 1856 reported sexual offences against a child under 16 years.1
  • 10% of secondary school students report witnessing adults at home hitting or physically hurting each other once or more in the last year.11

Intimate partner violence (IPV)

Adult sexual assault

  • 29% of New Zealand women and 9% of men report having experienced sexual assault in their lifetime. 73% of these assaults against women and 54% of these assaults against men were perpetrated by a partner, ex-partner or other family member.[6]

Children and young people

  • In 2011/12, Child, Youth and Family received 152,800 reports of concern. 61,074 were deemed to require further action, leading to 21,525 findings of abuse or neglect. 3884 children were in care placements.[1]
  • In 2011, NZ Police recorded 12 homicides of children and young people under 20 by a family member.5 In 2011, 113 children and youth were hospitalised for a serious non-fatal assault perpetrated by a family member.[2]
  • Between 1 in 3[3] and 1 in 5[4] New Zealand women and 1 in 109 men report having experienced child sexual abuse. 1 in 5 female and 1 in 20 male secondary school students report having experienced unwanted sexual contact in the last 12 months.[5]
  • In 2011, there were 1856 reported sexual offences against a child under 16 years.1
  • 10% of secondary school students report witnessing adults at home hitting or physically hurting each other once or more in the last year.11

 

[1]Child, Youth and Family. (2013). Retrieved June 2013, from http://www.cyf.govt.nz/about-us/who-we-are-what-we-do/information-for-media.html

[2] National Health Board Business Unit. (2011). National minimum dataset (Hospital events): Data Dictionary. Wellington: Ministry of Health.

[3]van Roode, T, Dickson, N, Herbison, P, Paul, C. (2009). Child sexual abuse and persistence of risky sexual behaviors and negative sexual outcomes over adulthood: Findings from a birth cohort. Child Abuse & Neglect, 33,161–172.

[4]Fanslow, JL, Robinson, EM, Crengle, S, Perese, L. (2007). Prevalence of child sexual abuse reported by a cross-sectional sample of New Zealand women. Child Abuse & Neglect, 31, 935–945.

[5]Clark, TC., Robinson, E., Crengle, S., Grant, S., Galbreath, RA. & Sykora, J. (2009). Youth ’07: The Health and Wellbeing of Secondary School Students in New Zealand. Findings on Young People and Violence. Auckland: The University of Auckland. Retrieved June 2013, from http://www.fmhs.auckland.ac.nz/faculty/ahrg/_docs/2007-violence-report-2010a.pdf

[1]New Zealand Police. (2013). Customised data extract

[2]Ministry of Justice (2013, February). [District and Family Court Data: Personal Communication].

[3] National Collective of Independent Women’s Refuges. (2012). Annual Report: July 2011–June 2012. Wellington: NCIWR. Retrieved June 2013, from https://womensrefuge.org.nz/users/Image/Downloads/PDFs/NWR_Annual_Report_2012_WEB.pdf

[4] Fanslow, JL et al. (2011). Sticks, Stones, or Words? Counting the Prevalence of Different Types of Intimate Partner Violence Reported by New Zealand Women. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, 20, 741–759.

[5] New Zealand Police. (2011). Homicide Victims Report, 2011. Retrieved February 2013, from https://www.police.govt.nz/statistics/2011/calendar

[6] Mayhew, P. Reilly, JL. (2009). The New Zealand Crime and Safety Survey. In Family Violence Statistics Report. Wellington: Families Commission, August. Retrieved June 2013, from http://www.familiescommission.org.nz/sites/default/files/downloads/family-violence-statistics-report.pdf

[7]Child, Youth and Family. (2013). Retrieved June 2013, from http://www.cyf.govt.nz/about-us/who-we-are-what-we-do/information-for-media.html

[8] National Health Board Business Unit. (2011). National minimum dataset (Hospital events): Data Dictionary. Wellington: Ministry of Health.

[9]van Roode, T, Dickson, N, Herbison, P, Paul, C. (2009). Child sexual abuse and persistence of risky sexual behaviors and negative sexual outcomes over adulthood: Findings from a birth cohort. Child Abuse & Neglect, 33,161–172.

[10]Fanslow, JL, Robinson, EM, Crengle, S, Perese, L. (2007). Prevalence of child sexual abuse reported by a cross-sectional sample of New Zealand women. Child Abuse & Neglect, 31, 935–945.

[11]Clark, TC., Robinson, E., Crengle, S., Grant, S., Galbreath, RA. & Sykora, J. (2009). Youth ’07: The Health and Wellbeing of Secondary School Students in New Zealand. Findings on Young People and Violence. Auckland: The University of Auckland. Retrieved June 2013, from http://www.fmhs.auckland.ac.nz/faculty/ahrg/_docs/2007-violence-report-2010a.pdf

 

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