Mana manouvres

Ex Mana Party candidate Clinton Dearlove announced he would stand in the Te Tai Tokerau electorate as an Independent, which would put him up against Hone Harawira – see Three MPs for Te Tai Tokerau?

He has now claimed that Mana have asked him to stand for Mana in a different electorate. He says he declined.

Details from his Facebook page.

Dearlove Declines Mana Party Request

Over the weekend Mr Dearlove declined a request to stand as a Mana candidate in the Tamaki Makaurau electorate by current Mana members.

“It had been a privilege to have had an opportunity to have stood for the Mana Party previously”.

“We firmly believe in the concept of MANA for ALL and carry that belief with us into the future. We honestly believe that politics is about people, we encourage the Mana Party to carry on its work to highlight the issues affecting our Whanau and Hapu”.

“There are numerous issues that are important, we believe there a number of different paths to achieve improved results for our Whanau and Hapu here in Te Tai Tokerau. We parted ways but we are travelling to the same destination, the empowerment of our Whanau and Hapu aspirations”.

There is a MANAinternet roadshow due to start this week. Mr Dearlove encourages Whanau and Hapu to join him at the roadshow to learn more.

“The Whanau and Hapu do not really know much about Laila or Mr Dotcom”.

However

“We are committed to our Vote Dearlove Get 3 campaign here in Te Tai Tokerau. We look forward to joining Hone and Kelvin in Parliament working for our Whanau and Hapu”.

Together building healthy communities – Tu Kotahi Tatou

Dearlove stood for Mana in Te Tai Tonga in 2011.

Mana’s Manukau/Auckland candidates

The Mana Party have announced ten candidates for Tamaki (Auckland) electorates. None are rated a chance to win electorates but will use them to campaign for the party vote.

Joe Carolan – Mt Albert

Unite Union Staff – Joe is the Team Leader for Auckland based Organisers with direct responsibilities Cinemas and Central Auckland Fast Food restaurants.

Guest The Daily Blog post – Joe Carolan – I’m all for left wing unity, but not when the other guys are trying to kill you
Senior Organiser with Unite Union, writer for http://www.socialistaotearoa.org, Mana founding member

@SolidarityJoe
Irish socialist living in Aotearoa.

Socialist Aotearoa

Yvonne Dainty – Manurewa

Independent candidate for Auckland Council – Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board – Tamaki Subdivision

Everyone has a basic human right to live where they choose to make and be part of community as a family. To thrive and prosper under fair and due process and the right to Consultation, Accountability and Transparency.

State Housing is not a privilege it is a right. Social and Economic cleansing is not Social Equality.

Born in Tamaki attended local schools. Represented Auckland Hockey Teams and Waka Ama, and still an active member in the community.

I have written policy in 2009 for Health and Housing.

Community in Unity are families made up of Social Equality without prejudice.

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Dr Sitaleki Finau – Maungakiekie

Sitaleki ‘Ata’ata Finau was born in Masilamea, Tonga. He attended several primary schools at Te’ekiu, Nukunuku, Nuku’alofa and Toloa. He entered Tonga High School in 1961, and Auckland Grammar School in 1967. He later attended the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, graduating in 1975 from the School of Medicine, and in1981 graduated from the University of Otago, New Zealand with a Postgraduate Diploma of Community Health
. Since 1994, he has been a registered public health specialist in New Zealand, Australia and the Pacific.

He had since worked as: Assistant Professor for the University of Hawaii in Pohnpei; the Manager of Community Health Service for South Pacific Commission; Senior District Medical Officer and Public Health Specialist with the Remote Health Services and the Royal Australian Flying Doctors in Alice Spring, Central Australia; senior lecturer at the University of Auckland Medical school; and the Professor of Public Health at Fiji School of Medicine, Fiji in 2001 t0 2006. In June 2006 Professor Sitaleki became the Director of the Pasifika at Massey Strategy to put Pacificans in Massey University and Massey in and among the Pacific populations.Sitaleki is also interested in tennis, rugby, people, and food. He dabbles in writing of poetry and short stories mainly for his three children. He is passionate about all matters Pacific and cultural democracy.

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Roger Fowler – Papakura

Candidate 2013 - Roger & his wife Lyn have lived in Mangere East for 35 years, bringing up their family of four children and five mokopuna. Currently manager of the Mangere East Community Learning Centre, Roger has been a life-long community activist, and awarded a QSM 1999. A leading civil rights & peace advocate, & unionist since 1969. Occupations have included: bus driver, welder, & citizen journalist. Stood for the ARC in 2007, gaining nearly 11,000 votes in Manukau. Led many community campaigns including shutting down the polluting Airport incinerator. Editor of Fare Free NZ blog promoting free public transport, and Kia Ora Gaza website, Roger led two Kiwi delegations on humanitarian convoys to Gaza. He returned to Gaza on a fact-finding mission last November, & organized the NZ Conference on Palestine 2013. Working with MANA to transform Auckland into a vibrant city where the people & the environment always come first.

KIA ORA GAZA MISSION
Kia Ora Gaza is a New Zealand network dedicated to breaking the inhuman and illegal Israeli siege of Gaza by delivering humanitarian aid, fostering fraternal relations, enhancing understanding of Palestine and the Middle East, and cooperating with others who have similar aims.

Spoke at Socialist Aotearoa Conference 2013

Lisa Gibson – Tamaki

Member of the Tamaki Housing Group

Post on Socialist Aotearoa blog – We shall not be moved.

Spoke at Socialist Aotearoa Conference 2013

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUpi4BRNQ04

John Minto – Mt Roskill

Auckland mayoral candidate 2013 - John Minto for Mayor: “We need a Kiwi socialism”

A major goal of the Minto for Mayor campaign, John explains, is to change the perception of MANA as simply a Maori Party split, with Pakeha (European-ethnicity) leftists merely being supporters of Maori aspirations. John gives this as the reason why, in the last general election in 2011, “all of the MANA candidates in general seats bombed”, and only their main Maori spokesperson, Hone Harawira, was elected to Parliament.

Building “a broader base for MANA in Tamaki” is thus a crucial goal of the campaign. To this end, John mentions the role of revolutionary leftists – in particular the Socialist Aotearoa group – in his campaign, alongside single-issue activists such as the Tamaki Housing Group and some individual Green Party members.

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Makelesi Ngata – Upper Harbour

Candidate 2013  Auckland Council – Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board – Tamaki Subdivision – I was born and raised in Aotearoa (New Zealand), female and 36 years of age, Polynesian descent. I come from a very big but close knit family. I grew up in Glen Innes, from Madeline Avenue to Torrington Crescent. I attended Glen Taylor Primary School, then went on to attend Glen Innes Intermediate and finished my secondary school years at Glendowie College, landing my first job at 3 Guys as a checkout girl.

Studying in various tertiary institutions and working in different roles has taught me a lot, it is time to stand up and say “enough is enough”. Discrimination and segregation derives from unjust policies and unjust law; we need to learn from history, not repeat it! Implement a plan that is fair and just. We are not to ‘oppress but to progress’. The big picture is not to be exclusive but inclusive, regardless of race or social background.

Comment The Daily Blog: I totally support you Joe Carolan as we have one heck of a fight on our hands. In saying that the movement of the people have been fighting and supporting at grass roots level. Now that MP Hone Harawira is taking Mana to another level, politicians want to slam the new alliance. I say “grow up and get over it”! Move on because time waits for nobody nor does the Government’s selling of Aotearoa and the breed of merciless corporate corrupted bodied scumbags, that bring in oil rigs and evil mindsets of gentrification as we see evident today. People out there that still want to vote for National? Better check themselves before they wreck themselves. At the end of the day no kiwis will be able to afford homes in their own country. Let alone securing a job and having to pay back debt on student loans. So if you want all this to go away their is only one way to turn to the left! to the left!

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Pat O’Dea – Epsom

Mana candidate for Epsom 2011.

“Pat O’Dea is an Auckland based Socialist Worker activist and former Communist Party of New Zealand member. He is from an Irish Republican supporting family.” Source

Unity Aotearoa

Facebook Biography
Trade unionist, peace activist and land rights activist Pat O’Dea affectionately known as “protest pat” by his workmates is standing in Epsom where he intends use the electorate as a base to attack the right –wing polices advocated by ACT.

“Their policies designed to appeal to red-neck elements are racist and need to be challenged head on and this is exactly what MANA’s policies and people will do,” Mr O’Dea says.

James Papali’i – Mangere

Mr Papali’i also chaired the Mangere East Labour Branch Party for the past 15 years recently resigning to take up the challenge of standing for Mangere representing the Mana party. He is well known in the Mangere Community and he currently works voluntarily for the Samoan Fesoasoani Trust which was founded by Alan Tanuelu and his dad Thomas Papali’i who passed away in 2000. James currently works for M.U.M.A as their Kaitoko Whanau Worker in the areas of Mangere, Otahuhu and Papatoetoe. Source

GUEST BLOG: James Papali’i – Mangere Peace Festival

Joe Trinder – Manukau East

Candidate 2013 - I live in Mangere and am married with one daughter. I am an average Kiwi and work in Information Technology in the Security Industry. I am passionate about Manukau and want free public transport with free wifi. I want to build 20,000 Council rental homes, a living wage for Aucklanders of $18.40 an hour and Robin Hood rates.

Endorsed by Union Auckland.

Mana Party member Joe Trinder, who is contesting the Manukau ward, says he wants to launch a policy to discriminate against the big foreign restaurants.
He was impressed during a recent visit to San Francisco by the cheap, nutritious and healthy food options being offered by the Hispanic community.
But people in south Auckland are facing “death by fried chicken”, Mr Trinder, of Ngati Awa, says.
He says he would also like to get smaller, local businesses which sell fried chicken to change their menus to offer healthier food, such as burritos.

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See: SOCIALISM 2013 – Socialist Aotearoa Conference

12.00pm – 1.00pm | Te Kapehu Whetū: The Future of Mana
With: John Minto Mana’s Auckland Mayoral candidate; Lisa Gibson, Tamaki Makaurau chair; Roger Fowler, Mangere council candidate and Respect Our Community chair;

“Almost everyone” knows Wairangi Koopu

MANA announces their MANA Youth Ambassador – Harawira

Ex New Zealand Warrior hard man and Maori television media personality Wairangi Koopu has joined the MANA strategy team as the new MANA Youth Ambassador in another game changer move for the MANA party.

“When we say we want more change for rangatahi, by rangatahi, we mean it”, says Hone Harawira, MANA Party Leader and MP for Te Tai Tokerau.

“The great thing about Wairangi is he is known by almost everyone in Aotearoa because not only is he a former Warriors League player but as a presenter on one of the coolest shows on Maori TV, CODE, so his public appeal is really up there”, said Harawira

Koopu is 34 so is getting on a bit to be a youth ambassador. The surname was vaguely familiar but f ‘Warriors’ hadn’t been mentioned I wouldn’t have connected him to league, although I’ve sort of followed the Warriors over the years.

I’ve never heard of “one of the coolest shows on Maori TV, CODE”.

I doubt “almost everyone” will know him, maybe some of MANA’s constituency but not across the youth of the country.

Koopu may work well for MANA but it will be difficult attracting disinterested youth to politics.

Disturbing attack on Harawira’s office

Hone Harawira’s electorate office in Kaitaia has had shots fired at it. MSN News reports:

Mana Party leader Hone Harawira says shots have been fired through the window of his Kaitaia office.
“I get threatened with violence and I get death threats but when somebody starts taking shots at my office than that’s another matter altogether,” he said.

“It’s life-threatening and I hope the police catch the perpetrators soon.”

“Politics can be a tough game and you can get hardened against some of the nasty and mean-spirited attacks against you,” he said on Tuesday night.

“But shooting into an office without knowing who might be inside is more than scary.”

Stuff also reported this but it was the third item in their Today in Politics:

The main street office was reportedly peppered with bullet holes which a spokesperson for Harawira said were thought to have been caused by shots fired from an air rifle.

Harawira told 3 News he was not sure when office was targeted and said he was worried about the safety of his staff.

Oddly I can’t find this on the 3 News website.

If an (alleged) attack like this happened to an office of John Key or David Cunliffe it’s hard to imagine so little media attention on it.

Harawira is right, politics can be mean spirited and nasty. He has a history of being abusive and provocative. In 2009 he said Phil Goff “and his mates should be lined up against a wall and shot” – see ‘Goff should be shot’ – Harawira’s latest gaffe

But regardless of Harawira’s past the actual firing of shots like this is very disturbing.

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Are Labour’s tax plans bottom lines?

Labour has announced changes to tax in the their alternate budge, promoting it as Labour’s alternative Budget for a strong economy and fair society.

The tax increases are modest compared to Labour’s proposals in 2011 and won’t affect most people very much (until CGT kicks in).

The biggest unanswered question is whether these changes would be bottom lines for a Labour led government, or whether Labour would be prepared to negotiate changes with Greens or Mana in a coalition agreement.

Both Greens and Mana support a Capital Gains Tax but they also want to increase other taxes except for lower income earners where they both propose large tax free thresholds.

Are Labour’s tax proposals open to coalition negotiation?

Stuff reports that Labour softens its tax stance.

Labour leader David Cunliffe said the party would impose a new top tax rate of 36 per cent on income above $150,000 a year, a move that would cost someone on $200,000 a year about $30 a week.

It is a major softening of former leader Phil Goff’s 2011 plan to lift it to 39c.

However, a parallel rise in the tax on trusts to 36c would see it bring in about the same amount of extra revenue.

Parker said aligning the trust rate with the top tax rate would avoid trusts being used as tax-avoidance vehicles.

There’s doubt about whether it will bring in the amounts claimed as the company tax rate would remain at 28% which will encourage restructuring for those who can to avoid the higher personal and trust rates.

The change would favour those in business over wage earners, but because it’s just a tweak to the top rate for high income earners most people probably won’t be bothered by it.

The 15 per cent tax on capital gains, excluding the family home, would bring in $790 million a year by 2020.

That seems much as previously announced (2011) with a number of exemptions and still defers to an Expert Panel.

An Expert Panel will be established to deal with issues that are technical in nature and involve areas where a high degree of specialised knowledge is required before a final decision can be reached.

They also propose a ‘crackdown on avoidance’ (which in general is nothing new):

A crackdown on tax avoidance, particularly by multinationals such as Facebook and Google, would bring in $200m a year by 2018-19.

Inland Revenue would “embed” auditors in companies with a history of tax avoidance.

It’s highly questionable whether tax on multinationals can be increased significantly without international co-operation.

Green Party tax policy:

To promote greater equality, the Greens will enhance the progressivity of the tax system by introducing an income tax-free threshold and a comprehensive capital gains tax (excluding the family home).

To create incentives to move the economy in a more sustainable direction, the Greens will introduce a suite of ecological taxes on waste, pollution, and scarce resources.

The introduction of a comprehensive capital gains tax, new ecological taxes, and through better enforcement of current tax law, the tax base will be broadened and hence made more resilient.

Mana tax policies:

Remove GST from all food (and everything else), but introduce a tax on fast foods and soft drinks.

Significantly increase the tax take by introducing a tax on financial speculation, called the “Hone Heke tax” (chopping down GST and income tax), which will be designed using examples of similar taxes introduced overseas. Initially it will be used to replace the annual $15 billion collected by GST.

Reduce the tax paid by low income earners by not taxing the first $27,000 earned and introduce a more progressive tax scale where the wealthy accept the responsibility to pay the largest share of the tax income.

 

Internet Mana right and wrong on electoral reform

The Internet Party with the MANA Movement are campaigning to make changes to MMP

Internet Party
PETITION

Sign the petition to give our party votes equal value by lowering the 5% MMP threshold and removing the one-seat threshold.

Who do we want to petition?

The NZ House of Representatives.

What do we want them to do?

We want Parliament to take action to make changes to MMP. The Electoral Act should be changed to give all party votes equal value. Parliament should lower the Party Vote threshold (from the current 5%), and remove the one-seat threshold (the coat-tails rule).
Why is this important?

The most important feature of a democratic electoral system is that everyone’s vote counts equally. MMP was a big improvement on First Past the Post – but some of its features still mean that some votes count more than others.

In the 2011 MMP referendum New Zealanders voted to keep MMP but to make it better. This lead to an Electoral Commission review of some of the details of MMP, including the Party Vote threshold and the one-seat threshold (the so-called coat-tails rule).

Currently your Party vote only counts if your Party either wins 5% of the vote or wins an electorate seat. Since MMP was introduced every new Party in Parliament has been a break-away from an existing Parliamentary Party.

Your Party Vote is your most important vote as it decides the make-up of Parliament. Under the current rules over 100,000 Party Votes can be wasted unless a party wins an electorate seat.

The Electoral Commission has said that the 5% Party Vote threshold is too high and it should be lowered. They recommended an initial change to a 4% threshold but also said that a 3% threshold would not create problems for Parliamentary stability. The Commission recommended lowering the threshold at the same time as abolishing the one-seat threshold. Research by Political Science Professor Rob Salmond presented to the Electoral Commission review showed that claims that low thresholds cause unstable parliaments are a myth and are not supported by the evidence from around the world. He recommended a threshold of no more than 2%.

The Internet Party has launched this petition with the MANA Movement because we believe that Party Votes should have equal value, whether or not a party wins an electorate seat.

I’ve posted a number of times on substantially reducing the threshold so agree with this aim, but I’m not sure that a petition is the best way to achieve it  fair result.

3 News/Radio Live report Internet Mana wants MMP threshold lowered

Internet Party leader Laila Harre says it is wrong that a party can get more than 100,000 votes and still not be represented in Parliament.

“In order for all party votes to have equal value, we need to see a reduction in that threshold,” she says.

Ms Harre says there would be no stability problems even if the threshold was lowered to 3 percent.

Internet-MANA would need the support of both Labour and Greens (at least) to get this changed but both those parties say they want recent Electoral Commission recommendations implemented. This would favour large parties even more, as while it would lower it would lower the threshold to 4% it would also drop the ‘coat tail’ provision which would mean smaller parties would be less fairly represented if they won an electorate.

In another 3 News report Internet Mana seeking electoral reform:

Mana leader Hone Harawira said the 5 percent party vote threshold was “undemocratically high” and should be separated from the one-seat threshold.

Internet Mana wants an equal value for all party votes to underpin any change to electoral law.

“This could be done before the election provided that those parties who have benefited from the current rules do so in the spirit of one person, one party vote,” said Ms Harre.

Calling for it to be changed before the election suggests this is more an election campaign strategy rather than an attempt to change the rules – there is nowhere near enough time to change the electoral rules this close to an election and it would be wrong to do so. Petitions

Few if any current MPs are likely to support this timeframe.

I don’t have any problem with Internet-MANA pushing for abolishing coat tailing while aiming to try and benefit from it, they are entitled to use the current system while promoting a change.

Harre and Harawira must be aware there’s pretty much zero chance of any change before the election, again I see no problem with them using the petition as a campaign tool, other parties have used petitions and a referendum promote their own agendas.

I hope that after the election they are still keen to promote the lowering or dropping of the threshold.

How Internet/Mana will appear on the ballot #2

As per the previous re-post, how will candidates and parties be placed on the ballot paper:

I presume they won’t stand candidates from both parties in one electorate.

It will depend on where they are on the candidate list alphabetically as to how far below (and in the left column) the umbrella party will be listed, also alphabetic.

In Te Tai Tokerau in 2011 Hone Harawira was the second of four candidates listed. The layout would be similar to this:

Te Tai Tokerau result 2011

Mana would not appear beside Harawira – Labour would be just above his line.
Internet Mana would have been tenth, after the Green Party.

I wonder if the separation will affect the likelihood of two ticks for Harawira/Internet-Mana.

Sample ballot paper:

Labour staunch in contesting Te Tai Tokerau

Labour seem staunch in their determination to contest the Te Tai Tokerau electorate. This is at odds with what has been described as “the new Auckland left”.

Kelvin Davis, Labour’s candidate for , continues to promote his chances in contesting Te Tai Tokerau for Labour against Mana’s Hone Harawira (electorates will be contested as MANA, only the party vote will be sought for Internet/MANA).

Davis linked to Today in politics: Saturday, May 31:

Davis will put in 110pc to win Tai Tokerau

Retread Labour MP Kelvin Davis likes a rugby analogy. And he is adamant he will not lay down or allow Labour to cut a deal in Te Tai Tokerau for the election, backing himself to take the seat off Mana leader Hone Harawira. “I played rugby until I was 40 so, in 20 years of senior rugby, not once did I step on to a rugby field and want to come second.” He says he is the most logical, intelligent, and sensible person to become MP for Tai Tokerau.

He is clearly backed by Labour leader David Cunliffe as interviewed on Q & A yesterday.

Corin Dann: …in Te Tai Tokerau can you give voters an assurance that there’s going to be no cup of tea deal to ensure that Hone Harawira has a clear run at that seat?

David Cunliffe: I can assure voters that Labour is contesting vigorously all seven Maori seats and we think we have the opportunity to win all seven.

Kelvin Davis is a terrific candidate as you have no doubt heard, he is passionate about representing the people of Te Tai Tokerau, and we’re backing him to do that.

This follows a Radio NZ report on Friday: Labour says no Te Tai Tokerau deal

Mr Cunliffe said he expects that Kelvin Davis, who was 1165 votes behind Mr Harawira at the 2011 election, to run a vigourous campaign. He said there would be no deals with other parties until after the election on 20 September once it is known what voters want.

Mr Davis is adamant he is in the competition to win. “It would be immensely damaging up in Te Tai Tokerau. The people up there do not want to see an MP whose prepared to roll over for anyone. They want somebody up there who’s prepared to stand and fight for what’s important to them.”

He told Radio New Zealand’s Morning Report programme on Friday the Internet-Mana alliance is a ruse and a scam and he would fight them for the seat.

“I’m the best person – the logical, the intelligent, the sensible person – to become the Member of Parliament for Te Tai Tokerau. They can see through this whole ruse. Basically it’s a scam to get their vote.”

Hone Harawira said Mr Davis had lost the seat several times before and is confident his constituents supported the alliance.
Mr Harawira said opposition parties shouldn’t be fighting each other. “We can either focus on attacking one another and end up with a limited number of seats and no possibility of changing the Government or we can be intelligent enough, and big enough, and bold enough to work together.”

Davis has continued the attack against Internet/MANA on Twitter today:

Sorta ironic that in 1914 Mata Hari was a German agent, and in 2014 there’s Laila.

Davis has been criticised by some on the left who want to see co-operation amongst parties “for the greater good”. A comment on Davis’ Twitter page:

Will Edmonds Yup, previous Labour voter, but disgusted by your apparent inability to work for the greater good on this issue. You’ve lost my vote, just ridiculous.

Chris Trotter blasted Davis on The Daily Blog in Authoritarian Labour: Why Kelvin Davis needs to STFU – and soon!

DAVID, MATT, SOMEBODY – PLEASE! Tell Kelvin Davis to pull his head in. His outburst on Radio New Zealand’s Morning Report this morning was way beyond embarrassing. The ill-considered slagging of Hone Harawira and the Internet-Mana Party (IMP) not only reflected poorly on his own political skills, but it also raised doubts about Labour’s overall ability to read what is happening in the run-up to 20 September.

Trotter seems to be swept up by the Dotcom/Mana mania, where some on the left seem to think it will be the saviour of the Left’s election chances. But trotter het”s unusally carried away.

It wasn’t just the absence of any semblance of strategic – or even tactical – understanding that was so worrying about Davis’s performance this morning, it was his barely concealed aggression. There is an anger in Davis that calls into question his suitability for any kind of public office. Anger, and what appears to be a classic authoritarian character structure (the two often go together).

Just listen to how he describes his family in the potted biography Labour has displayed on its website. Davis tells us that he is “married with three beautiful, intelligent and respectful children”. It’s the use of the word “respectful” that gives him away. His need for respect and his use of the word as a distinguishing character marker, as in: “My children show me respect – do yours?”, tell us a lot about Davis’s personality and where he most likely fits on the Left-Right/Authoritarian-Libertarian grid.

My guess is that he occupies a position that places him towards the Authoritarian end of the Authoritarian-Libertarian gradient and well to the right on the Left-Right spectrum.

Very ironic that Trotter wants to dictate to Davis and at the same time accuses him of being authoritarian.

There seems to be a battle looming on the left, and Labour seem to be staunching up against the attempted takeover of the left – and Government – by “the new Auckland Left that is now influencing so much of these strategic moves”.

Cunliffe and Davis at least are clearly in the camp that wants to see Labour dominate in Te Tai Tokerau and dominate the left. The election itself may be just another battle in a bigger war – if Internet/MANA can establish credibility and build themselves into a cohesive political force.

Will Hone’s wife have the final say?

The Mana/Internet Party alliance decision gets even more bizarre. Hone Harawira was previously reported saying that the Mana executive would probably decide.

Mr Harawira indicated the final decision would be made by senior party figures rather than a wider vote.

“It will probably be made by the executive in the final analysis.”

But now he says that if his wife says no “it’s probably no” - Harawira’s wife wary of Dotcom link

Mana leader Hone Harawira’s wife, veteran activist Hilda Halkyard-Harawira, is among party members concerned about a likely alliance with the Internet Party.

Halkyard-Harawira raised her concerns about the alliance in a closed session yesterday at the party’s conference in Rotorua, with Harawira confirming she remained wary of it.

“She’s wary of the deal and understandably so. She sees it from not just a perspective of a Mana member or the wife of the Mana leader but from a long history of involvement in politics and activism,” Harawira said.

He said his wife, who declined to comment, shared the concerns of others about the potential watering down of what the movement stood for. She told members yesterday she was worried about the mana of the movement being diminished by relationships with other parties.

Protecting that was important and the leaders needed to be wary of guarding that credibility, Harawira said.

“The funny thing for me is that I can convince the whole of the movement but if she says no, it’s probably no.”

Regardless of what “the whole of the movement” thinks it could come down to one person’s say? What position does Hilda Halkyard-Harawira have in the Mana movement other than wife of the party leader??

Minto on Mana/IP alliance pros, cons and questions

John Minto has posted at The Daily blog about the conference debate on the proposed alliance between the Internet and Mana Parties. It gives a good outline of party thinking and lays out how he sees the pros and cons.

Mana and the Internet Party – strategic alliance or wtf? 

The proposal for some sort of electoral relationship arose from a meeting between Mana leader Hone Harawira and Kim Dotcom earlier in the year. The first benefit to both Mana Movement and the Internet Party – and the country for that matter – is to ensure all votes cast to get rid of the National government are counted. Under current law a party which falls short of the 5% threshold has its votes wasted – potentially up to 130,000 anti-National votes not counted.

This fundamentally undemocratic aspect of our MMP system is a result of pressure from National and Labour to keep parliament as a cosy duopoly and disenfranchise thousands of voters in the process.

So the AGM debated at length whether to proceed to formally explore a possible alliance. It was a riveting four hours as speakers spoke for or against the idea.

As part of the discussion I was asked to present what I saw as the “pros” and “cons” of a possible “strategic alliance” with the Internet Party.

Here’s what I came up with:

Pros

1.    Increased profile for Mana and as we are seen as more relevant with a larger combined party vote with the Internet Party.

2.    Creation of interest and even excitement among many younger voters and non-voters.

3.    A greater likelihood of getting Mana Movement list MPs through a combined party vote.

4.    Greater resources to fight a party vote campaign.

5.    Greater resources to help inspire and enrol current non-voters and get them to the polling booth.

6.    There is already some areas of strong policy agreement with the Internet Party to: stop GCSB spying, withdraw from the “five eyes” spy alliance, provide internet privacy rights and cheap/free access to the internet, provide free tertiary education and oppose the TPPA.

7.    Ensuring that the Internet Party and their supporters are committed to changing the government.

8.    MANA brand remains in Maori electorate campaigns which are a key focus this election.

Cons

1.    Damage to the public perception of Mana:

  •  Mana may lose respect as a kaupapa Maori movement and damage our chances in the Maori seats.
  •  Mana Movement may lose respect as a movement for the poor and dispossessed if we have an alliance with a high-profile wealthy partner.
  •  Mana Movement may be seen by some as compromising our principles for money (irrespective of the truth of this)

2.    A potential watering down of our policies to create a joint Mana-Internet Party vote campaign.

3.    A potential loss of control of Mana policy and direction to a new joint venture.

4.    A risk of ending up with fewer seats than we would have on our own.

The three key questions which arose from this are:

1.    Would an alliance enhance or damage Mana as a kaupapa Maori movement?

2.    Would an alliance enable us to gain greater parliamentary representation without compromising our policies or principles?

3.    How would we retain our integrity, and be seen to retain our integrity, in such an alliance?

 All speakers recognised the risks to the movement and to the individuals involved – we all value our integrity – but after four hours a clear consensus emerged that we should take the step to see if an arrangement agreeable to Mana can be reached. (Each of Mana’s seven rohe supported the decision to keep talking with the Internet Party).

Mana Party members agreed to “move forward in negotiations” (NZ Herald):

The Mana Party has given its leaders a month to negotiate, before they put any proposed alliance out to the party’s local branches for consultation.

Minto:

We are withholding judgement till we see what emerges from further discussion. At that point any possible agreement will be discussed by Mana rohe and branches before a final vote is taken. 

However Hone Harawira seems to have decided already and intimates it won’t be decided by a party vote…

Asked whether he thought the deal would go ahead, Mr Harawira said: “I’d certainly like to think so.”

And while the party is consulting the executive (led by Harawira) will decide.

Mr Harawira indicated the final decision would be made by senior party figures rather than a wider vote.

“It will probably be made by the executive in the final analysis.”

See  Harawira’s way or the highway.

In the meantime opposition continues – Dotcom a neoliberal millionaire who sounds like John Key – Mana’s Sue Bradford

  The Internet Party leader did not manage to seal an alliance with Mana when he visited the party’s AGM on Saturday (although talks will continue). And his charm seems to have singularly failed to winover one of Mana leader Hone Harawira’s key lieutenants, Sue Bradford.

Instead, Bradford hardened her opposition, and walked out of the meeting before the key vote – creating a schism Mana can ill-afford given Labour candidate Kelvin Davis is polling ahead in Harawira’s Te Tai Tokerau (Northland) seat.

“Getting into bed with a neoliberal millionaire who’s facing legal challenges is quite a curious proposal for a party like Mana that has stood so strongly and staunchly on its reputation for fighting for those who have less … and for standing up against the neoliberal agenda that John Key that others are running,” Ms Bradford told Firstline this morning.

“It’s not compatible and undermines everything Mana has achieved over the past three years … When I heard him speaking on Saturday, it was like listening to John Key,” Ms Bradford said.

It could be a challenging time for the Mana Party over the next month of consultations and decision making.

In the meantime the Internet Party remains in limbo, leader-less, candidate-less and alliance-less.

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