NARK Stop Child Abuse media coverage

Stop Child Abuse Memorial, 3 September 2011 has grown into a major event of ordinary people standing up and speaking up about child abuse. The event is getting coverage around the country.

Location map.

Tuesday 9 August 2011

Memorial planned for abused kids

Waikato Times

A Waikato woman who was labelled a nark for talking to police about the death of a Ngaruawahia baby is asking New Zealanders to remember child abuse victims in a special memorial.

Nation of Advocates for the Rights of Kids (Nark) founder Cherie Kurarangi Sweeney said she would like New Zealanders to place soft toys at war memorials on September 3.

The memorial was for children who had died at the hands of someone who was supposed to be caring for them, she said.

Thursday 11 August 2011

Soft-toy campaign to highlight child abuse

The Herald

A mother wants a war memorial gesture to draw attention to often brutal deaths.

A Ngaruawahia mother hopes soft toys can save lives in a unique national protest against child abuse.

Cherie Kurarangi Sweeney, a neighbour of 6-month-old Serenity Scott-Dinnington who died in April, is calling on all New Zealanders to lay soft toys at war memorials around the country on September 3 to remember children who have died from abuse.

Saturday 13 August 2011

RSA embraces soft toy protest

The Daily Post

Rotorua’s Returned Services Association is supporting an anti-child abuse protest organised by a Ngaruawahia woman.

Cherie Kurarangi Sweeney wants people to leave a soft toy at their local war memorial on the morning of September 3 in protest at the high number of deaths caused by child abuse in New Zealand.

Monday 29 August 2011

Toy tribute for children at memorial

Howick and Pakuranga Times

CUDDLY soft toys are being collected to pay tribute to fallen heroes and to serve as a reminder that children need to be protected.

People across the country will be placing teddy bears on war memorials as part of a campaign set up by outspoken child safety advocate Cherie Kurarangi Sweeney.

Tuesday 30 August 2011

Child victims to be remembered

Marlborough Express

A Picton woman inspired by Ngaruawahia mother Cherie Kurarangi Sweeney’s efforts to raise awareness of child abuse is organising a memorial in Picton to remember children who have died through child abuse.

Karen McLeod of Picton is organising the Picton event…

Wednesday 31 August 2011

‘Narks’ urged to speak up about child abuse

Taranaki Daily News

Taranaki mums proud to call themselves “narks” are urging more people to speak up about child abuse.

Four of them are organising memorial events on Saturday to remember children killed at the hands of caregivers. They join “narks” around New Zealand leading the cause on behalf of new national organisation Nark: Nation of Advocates for the Rights of Kids.

Antoniah Snooks, Renee Barlow and Kirsten Lawrence are co-ordinating the New Plymouth event at Marsland Hill, while in Central and South Taranaki Carolyn Cragg has taken up the cause. People are being asked to donate a toy in remembrance and donations are going to Barnardos and the Open Home Foundation.

Taranaki mums proud to call themselves ‘narks’

TVNZ

Four women are organising memorial events on Saturday to remember children killed at the hands of caregivers.

They join “narks” around New Zealand leading the cause on behalf of new national organisation Nark: Nation of Advocates for the Rights of Kids.

Rally for abused children

Central Leader

Nia Glassie, the Kahui twins and Serenity Scott-Dinnington all died violently. But a young mother wants to show Aucklanders that other children don’t have to meet the same fate.

Seemal Govan will ask members of the public to place a toy or teddy bear at the New Lynn War Memorial this Saturday as a mark of solicitude for the hundreds of babies who have died as victims of child abuse.

All teddy bears and toys left at the site will be donated to organisations that work with children, such as Women’s Refuge and Starship Hospital.

Friday 2 August 2011

Strong symbol for child abuse

Sunlive

Tauranga NARK memorial service organiser Suzy Brown says child abuse is a subject she is passionate about after acting as a foster parent for Child Youth and Family – fostering many children who had suffered from abuse.

“The children I was fostering were mostly pre-school aged as that is the area I specialise in. I saw the call out for a NARK organiser in Tauranga and signed up straight away.”

Gisborne Herald

NARK is not a dirty word when it comes to protecting children, says Gisborne child advocate Trevor Shaskey.

Mr Shaskey is calling on Gisborne and East Coast people to support Sweeney and her cause by coming together and showing support in a peaceful rally and balloon release ceremony at the Cenotaph tomorrow at 11.30am.

Region active for spring weekend

The Malborough Express

A memorial will also be held at the Picton War Memorial on Sunday between noon and 3pm to raise awareness of child abuse. People are encouraged to lay soft toys at the memorial which will be donated to Women’s Refuge.

Karen McLeod, of Picton, is organising the Picton event, one of several to be held inspired by Ngaruawahia mother Cherie Kurarangi Sweeney’s efforts to raise awareness of child abuse. Ms Sweeney, a neighbour of six-month-old Serenity Scott-Dinnington who died in April, was labelled a nark when she spoke out after Serenity’s death.

Soft toys for a hard stance

The Daily Post

Toys will adorn one of Rotorua’s war memorials tomorrow to encourage people to speak up about child abuse.

Rotorua people are being encouraged to show their support for victims of child abuse by bringing a soft toy to the Arawa War Memorial in Government Gardens on Saturday.

Rotorua co-ordinator of Nark Angie Philps is organising the Rotorua Stop Child Abuse Now day which is being held on Saturday around the country.

Monday 5 September 2011

Event to remember child-abuse victims

Otago Daily Times

Toys instead of wreaths were placed at the bottom of Dunedin’s Cenotaph on Saturday, in memory of children who died in the worst imaginable circumstances.

Dunedin women Mary Sharp and Catherine Syme said they had come to drop off some toys because they wanted to show their respect for the child victims of abuse and raise awareness of the problem. People who knew abuse was occurring had to say something instead of keeping silent, they said.

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1 Comment

  1. News & Views – Saturday 3 September 2011 | Your Dunedin

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