One way racism

The water issue has stirred up emotions on both sides of the debate. One of these emotions is becoming highly charged due to one way racism.

Any perception of offence against Maori, manufactured or real, can become a major scandal, as John Key found out last week.

But abuse, intimidation, divisiveness and the like seems to be accepted as fair game when when directed at non-Maori.

This is apparent on blogs. I’ve been accused of racism twice over the weekend, on one occasion for stating agreement with Maori in At one with Māori on water.

There has been an example of reverse racism on The Standard last night. RedLogix posted this comment:

RedLogix 4.1.1

Maori are in effect via article two of the Treaty of Waitangi the only legitimate source of the granting of any consent to use any water from the rivers and lakes in their possession at the point of the signing of that treaty….

And all other land and resources in this country.

All you filthy colonising white maggot scum can crawl back to the slums you came from now.

(Maybe I should add a tag to this one, but for the life of me I can’t think which one…)

The final comment on tags was a wink signal to people who know RedLogix. But this was a flimsy excuse for posting what he knew would be a politically and racially divisive comment.

Support from others at The Standard was not surprising. Marty Mars, one who accused me of racism, laughed it off as a joke.

marty mars 4.1.1.1.3

LOL pete you need to take a break from the webs

And a Labour Party official…

 mickysavage 4.1.1.1.4

Yeah.  The theft of lands and forests and waterways and fisheries are immaterial but use a couple of cross words and there is hell to pay.

There are a lot of people, many of them reasonable and tolerant types, who are getting very annoyed at what is little more than one way reverse racism. Supposedly we dare not criticise or denigrate anything Maori, but are supposed to meekly accept any crap thrown at us.

I don’t accept this.

We should be working on building better tolerance and understanding of Maori issues, and this has to be (as Pita Sharples has said) “bridging relationships across Treaty partners”. A two way bridge.
Trying to drive a racial wedge for political purposes is not satire, it’s deliberate. And I believe it’s wrong.
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4 Comments

  1. QUOTE: “Trying to drive a racial wedge for political purposes is not satire, it’s deliberate. And I believe it’s wrong.” UNQUOTE

    I think you have pointed the real issue on the real issue: There has to be more going on than just water rights – for both sides. I am finding, like you, it to be quite disconcerting.

    I really don’t mind either, to be thought of as a “Conspiracy Theorist” – because I am always looking at the much larger picture for what it is and could end up being.

    Reply
  2. Martin Gibson

     /  16th July 2012

    I can understand why Maori have pursued this way of communicating; it gets headlines and creates action, but they know in their heart it is time to change gear. In order to help them to change gear we must avoid echoing their racism and keep pushing an “I’m ok, you’re ok” vision where we each play to our strengths and become greater than the sum of our parts. I frequently write to this end in the local paper and am always surprised at the silence at the other end of the line.
    http://www.gisborneherald.co.nz/article/?id=27666

    Reply
    • Thanks for pointing this out. I think those who jumped in to support you – and banned me for ‘quoting out of context’ – understood less than I did. I don’t think we’re that far apart on some things – provoking discussion being one of them.

      I understand your motive now and I agree with your main point.

      As you will probably know I can’t respond at TS.Your explanation deserves a good discussion, I hope someone else recognises that and gets it rolling.

      Your experiment showed that over-reaction – from both sides – will be a continuing barrier to resolving these things. So far the end result is ‘same old’.

      Reply

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