Family First folly – slanted on smacking

Another slanted smacking poll, a further futile Family First folly …

Poll: People want smacking law changed

The poll of 1000 randomly selected people was undertaken by Curia Market Research for advocacy group Family First.

Respondents were asked whether the anti-smacking law should be changed to state that “parents who give their children a smack that is reasonable and for the purpose of correction are not breaking the law”.

Of those asked, 77 per cent said yes, the law should be changed. Asked whether they thought the anti-smacking law had had any effect on child abuse, 77 per cent of respondents answered no.

They were also asked whether they would still smack their child to correct behaviour, despite the law.

Two out of three respondents, or 68 per cent, said they would.

Interesting, but the question is ambiguous and far from neutral – it is loaded to get the response Family First want.

“parents who give their children a smack that is reasonable and for the purpose of correction are not breaking the law”

Without defining “for the purpose of correction” the question is vague to the point of being useless.

And what is seen as “reasonable” can be very different to different people. To some people a tap on the hand or the bum is as far as reasonable would go, but to others think using weapons (sticks, belts etc), hitting to the extent of bruising or smacking on the ear is reasonable.

And this all seems pointless apart from self justifying the Family First smacking stance, I don’t know of any plans to change the “smacking” law.

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4 Comments

  1. Darryl

     /  18th March 2013

    The smacking law is ridiculous anyway. Should never have been passed in the first place. It hasn’t stopped the idiots who abuse there children.

    Reply
  2. Harriet

     /  18th March 2013

    “….And what is seen as “reasonable” can be very different to different people. To some people a tap on the hand or the bum is as far as reasonable would go, but to others think using weapons (sticks, belts etc), hitting to the extent of bruising or smacking on the ear is reasonable….”

    And that is what the law should stipulate – anything other than an open-handed smack below the waist is assualt.

    If rugby players from the age of 6 can differentiate between a ‘legal tackle’ and a head-high tackle above the chest – then adult parents can differentiate between a smack and assualt!

    NZ parents should not be taken for idiots by limp-wristed busy-bodies!

    Reply
  3. Keith

     /  18th March 2013

    I’m no limp wristed busy-body but I am against violence on children. Aside from being ineffective it teaches children that violence is the means to make people do what you want. And these ‘pro-smackers’ are probably wondering why there is so much violence in our society! Well that’s what the kids were taught.

    Good on you Pete for pointing out the flaws in the poll etc. Family First need to move onto more important things, this sort of stuff proves they are irrelevant.

    Reply
  4. Treetop

     /  18th March 2013

    Every infant/child has to be organised according to their level of physical and cognitive development. When this is lacking/absent an infant/child is put at risk, they may have an accident or they will require the care givers attention. When the care giver has too high expectations or no time available they generally become angry at the infant/childs behaviour.

    Anger is an emotional response to discomfort. When the care giver is angry this is usually when they will use physical force. Infants/children are killed/brain damaged/severely physically harmed because of the force used.

    When an infant/child is smacked physical force is used. I cannot understand why anyone thinks that using phyical force on a child is acceptable or that it has any benefit. I can understand having to restrain a child, e.g. who has run onto the road or hurriedly pick a child up when they may roll down a few steps.

    Reply

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