Maori views on Turei and racism

Two views of this from the Maori viewpoint. Joshua Hitchcock:

Reading Minister Tolley’s response to Metiria Turei and I do not see what all the fuss is about. But then, it is not my place to judge whether or not someone has experienced racism – it is a deeply personal experience and one in which context (in this instance, Metiria Turei’s life story) plays a huge part. Ad hominem attacks are a dangerous game to engage in, something Minister Tolley has found out this week.

Perhaps this presents an opportunity for the Green Party to take stock and reconsider some of their policy proposals that other groups consider racist. Anti-immigration, anti-foreigner policies which treat people differently based on the birth lottery have not gone down too well. It wasn’t that long ago the left were arguing that they were not racist. Racism is a personal experience – it is not for white liberals to argue racism along partisan lines. If foreigners feel unwelcome, or no longer welcome in New Zealand as a result of Green Party policy, then that is their experience and you cannot deny it.

Basically if it feels racist to you then it is. But that’s a double edged sword.

And Morgan Godfery: Anne Tolley: an agent of colourblind racism?

Tolley didn’t need to mention race. Her attack is loaded with social, political and racial assumptions. The unspoken context is that Metiria, a Maori woman who lives well and dresses better, is acting out of turn and out of step with her community. How can she be in touch with her community when she isn’t living like them? The premise is that a Maori woman cannot dress well and claim to represent her people. Because Maori live exclusively in poverty, amirite.

Is he right?

Many many debates and speeches in Parliament could be accused of being many things including sexist and racist and many other -ists if it is solely dependent on the feelings of the listener.

But dwelling on feelings, whether they are justified or not, resolve nothing.

Turei failed to address Tolley’s accusation of hypocrisy so that remains unchallenged. And it’s a common perception, even among generally Green sympathetic voters.

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1 Comment

  1. “Turei failed to address Tolley’s accusation of hypocrisy so that remains unchallenged. And it’s a common perception, even among generally Green sympathetic voters.”

    Could you explain what you mean by this?

    Reply

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