Good Standard on Labour leadership

An unusually good post and comment thread at The Standard on Labour’s leadership contest – My (late) vote.

Lyn Prentice is a campaigner from way back and has a good idea about how things work, especially with Labour – he’s it bit off the mark with some of his claims about National but that’s not his strength.

For a review of the leadership contenders and an insight into Labour campaigning it’s worth reading through the post and most of the comments.

Prentice happens to pick the leadership contest similar to I would (I’m not a Labour member so haven’t had to decided):

  1. Andrew Little
  2. David Parker
  3. Nanaia Mahuta
  4. Grant Robertson

I think I’d reverse Mahuta and Robertson.

And another old school Labour campaigner Anne names her preferred front bench.

  1. Andrew Little
  2. David Parker
  3. Grant Robertson
  4. Nanaia Mahuta
  5. David Cunliffe
  6. Phil Twyford
  7. Jacinda Ardern
  8. Annette King
  9. Phil Goff
  10. David Shearer

Her comment:

Yep. I came to the same conclusions for exactly the same reasons as lprent. A Little/Parker combination is what the Labour Party needs with Robertson, Mahuta, Cunliffe, Twyford, and Ardern taking the next five places. Annette King and Phil Goff still have a lot to offer in the way of experience and knowledge, but they have to give way to a new team. Having said that, I think they should – along with Shearer – take the next three places.

Leader plus ex leaders/acting leaders fill half of those positions – experience is valuable but it’s time the worked out how to work together and put the party ahead of their own ambitions or grievances.

I’d swap Robertson/Mahuta and Twyford/Ardern to put more female presence up the list. And I’m not sure that Goff should be that high, I’d rather look to the future more through Hipkins instead.

It’s worth repeating – interesting and worthwhile post and comments at The Standard.

Leave a comment

18 Comments

  1. Greg Moore

     /  16th November 2014

    I still can’t understand why they think Nanaia Mahuta will be good for the labour movement. In 18 years in parliament she has achieved exactly nothing.
    As an Auckland central resident I have met Jacinda a few times, and she has the ability to “connect” with people in their teens, all the way to crusty old fools like me. In time, she will be a big asset to the left.

    Reply
    • The Maori vote is important for Labour, it rescued them from even more embarrassment this election. They need recognition of that in the pecking order. But Mahuta needs to step up her representing substantially.

      Reply
      • Greg Moore

         /  16th November 2014

        That’s what I don’t get Pete. One could argue that the best representation Maori have ever had was from the Maori party. And yet this election voters seem to have drifted back to Labour who have done little, if anything for maori in the past.
        However, it was sooo good to see Kelvin Davis elected for many reasons, he’s a good bloke, and will represent Te Tai Tokerau well.

        Reply
        • I agree it was good to see Kelvin elected, that was on merit despite Labour floundering. I think the vote split between Maori and Mana made it easier for Labour. That may not happen next election, depending on whether Mana attempts a serious recovery or not.

          There’s been no news or media releases on Mana’s website since October 7.

          Reply
        • Mike C

           /  16th November 2014

          If not for my own personal feelings on this particular matter, I’d assume that you were of leftie persuasion. Would the real GregM please stand up. LOL.

          Reply
          • Greg Moore

             /  16th November 2014

            Haha! yes you got me. I voted Labour from 1984-2005, when they finally lost the plot. My politics are slightly left of centre which is why I voted National. )

            Reply
            • Kathy Maddren

               /  16th November 2014

              Judith Collins was a Labour Party supporter until at least 1999. Given her performance over the past few years, I’m left wondering if she still votes Labour. LOL.

            • I didn’t always vote Labour but the last time I voted for them was in 2005 too.

    • Sponge

       /  16th November 2014

      “I still can’t understand why they think Nanaia Mahuta will be good for the labour movement”

      I couldn’t agree more. She brings nothing to the table apart from being a woman and maori. She is, by all accounts, lazy. She is unappealing in her manner and appearance (I know it sounds shallow but it does matter) and appears to have little in the way of policy ideas that makes her a compelling choice as an MP let alone a party leader.

      Reply
  2. kathy maddren

     /  16th November 2014

    Doesn’t matter which of the four is picked to be the 2014 Labour Party Leader. They will just be replaced by some other useless wannabe in about a years time.

    Reply
    • Perhaps, but there are signs that Labour is finally starting to get it – they can’t just sit back squabbling amongst themselves and wait for their turn back in government, they need to fight for survival as a major party.

      Reply
      • Mike C

         /  16th November 2014

        Sadly, given the severe lack of quality in this year’s Labour Party Leader Pageant, the chances of Labour getting their shit together before 2017, get slimmer and slimmer each day that goes by Pee-Gee.

        Reply
    • Greg Moore

       /  16th November 2014

      Dead right Snoop, I almost feel like telling them all don’t even bother.

      Reply
  3. Mike C

     /  16th November 2014

    If Judith Collins and Cameron Slater had succeeded in carrying out their plan to roll John Key, and Kelvin Davis was the Leader of the Labour Party, then I would vote for Labour. God help New Zealand if she ever got to hold the reins of power.

    Reply
  4. I think Little & Mahuta as Co-Leaders could be a viable alternative.. OR maybe Robertson & Ardern ??

    Reply
  5. kittycatkin

     /  17th November 2014

    I agree about the appearance; no, it shouldn’t make a difference, and I am a believer in dressing to suit oneself, but it DOES make a difference. Nanaia will never be a fashion plate, but she seems to make little effort to look professional and like a credible Prime Minister. She would, if she was ever PM, (some hope) be representing NZ worldwide, and she would need to look the part as every other PM does. Mrs Cunliffe didn’t look the part of PM’s wife, either, somehow.Jacinda Ardern still looks a bit young for the part; give her a few years as deputy first. Grant Robertson looks the part-his husband is a busdriver-he doesn’t fit the gay stereotype of the redneck homophobic brigade…

    Reply

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