Abortion – rights and responsibilities

A thought provoking comment on rights and responsibilities associated with abortion.

Why is it legitimate for a women to unilaterally terminate a pregnancy when the father has zero rights in the matter.

And yet if the woman decides to keep the child, the father is then saddled with 20 years of child support payments? Again with zero rights in the matter.

The accepted answer is that it is the woman who is carrying the child and has all the rights to control over her body. But why then does she not also get to carry all the responsibility for her choice? Why does the father – who has had zero rights in the matter – get to carry responsibility for the outcome as well?

So far the rights of the mother to control her body completely trump any consideration of the father at all. Is that going to be socially and politically sustainable in the long run. And if not – what would a more equitable balance of rights and responsibilities look like?

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11 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  27th April 2015

    This is an old issue to me but clearly invidious to men. Not that there are not far too many men who fail to support their children where abortion was not in question. Both problems exist because the taxpayer is the default father and breadwinner.

    Reply
  2. Individual responsibility is essential for a healthy society, but this opposed by the state handing out money to any person who makes babies and can’t afford to keep them.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  27th April 2015

      Actually they just have to say they can’t afford to keep them. They don’t even have to make an effort.

      Reply
      • kiwi_guy

         /  27th April 2015

        That is what contemporary Feminism is all about: that women should not be held accountable for their actions and the State will pick up the tab for their poor life choices.

        There is a feminist Twitbook storm right now about a Sports Supplement advert “Are you beach body ready” with a hot model in a bikini. This has triggered the buffozillas BIG TIME, they call it fat shaming and believe the Patriarchy makes men hate fatties, they want obesity to be normailsed and considered sexual desirable.

        Reply
  3. The father had a choice when he chose to have unprotected sex.

    Reply
    • Both parties may have had that same choice.

      Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  27th April 2015

      Not necessarily. He may have been told the woman was on contraceptives, had an IUD fitted or it was the wrong time of the month. Or there may have been a condom failure.

      If the woman must give clear consent for sex surely the man must give clear consent for parenthood obligations if the woman has full control over any abortion decision?

      Reply
  4. kittycatkin

     /  27th April 2015

    I remember years ago reading an article in More magazine about or by a woman who wanted a baby, so she more or less shopped around for a suitable father, found one, began a relationship (telling him she was using contraception) and when she was pregnant ended the relationship. When he found out by some means that he was to be a father, he was very angry, and I don’t wonder, He could be liable financially, though that wasn’t the main issue; he could well not want to be the absentee father to end all absentee fathers; it could affect any future relationship that he had. He is suddenly a father without his consent or knowledge and denied any access to or relationship with his child. She wondered why he was so angry; I didn’t and nor did most people, judging by letters to the editor.

    Then there are women who pass off someone else’s child as their partner’s, and when the poor victim has put his name on the birth certificate, that means that he’s responsible for its keep for the next 18 years-even if it’s proved that he’s not the father.

    Yes, if the woman has sole rights, she should have sole responsibility also.

    People sneer at the idea of a male pill as if men can’t be trusted to be truthful about this-but men have to believe women who say that they’re protected. Why would most men want to be careless about such a potentially highly expensive issue ?

    In Hamilton a few years ago, when the idea of women having to work when the youngest child was ? age was being raised, a budget adviser (!!!) was telling women to have a child every 18 months so as to stay on the DPB indefinitely.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  27th April 2015

      Am I right in thinking if she had asked him for a sperm donation and impregnated herself he would not be recognised as the father nor liable for maintenance?

      Reply
      • kittycatkin

         /  27th April 2015

        My guess, from what I remember, is that he wasn’t the kind of person who would have agreed to that. He wanted a relationship and was fooled into thinking that he was in one, when all he was wanted for was a sperm donor. I would guess that if someone did agree to that, it would make no difference to their liablility and anyone who was asked to do such a thing would be a fool. A friend was, but decided against it, even though he knew the woman quite well. He didn’t want to either be a father with no access or to find himself in a potential legal mess. His father died when he was quite young, so he knew what it was like to have no father, and there was that aspect, too.

        The problem would be if the woman went back on her word and said that the baby had been made the usual way-how’s the manto prove it wasn’t ?

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  27th April 2015

          What then is the distinction with sperm donor clinics? They know who the donors and recipients are?

          Reply

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