Bob Jones moans

Bob Jones has published his side of the story about getting taken off a flight in Sir Bob Jones – Putting the Record Straight.

Once again, I took my seat, donned my earphones and settled into my book, of which more shortly. There was a tap on my shoulder. I looked up to see a young hostess frowning at me and, assuming it was the usual seat forward silliness, pushed the side button and returned to reading. She tapped again.  I took off the headphones.

“You’re in the emergency seat.”

“Yes.”

“Do you know you’re in the emergency seat?”

“Yes.”

“Do you want to change seats?”

“Not particularly.”

She then disappeared and I resumed reading.  Then came another tap. This time a grim-faced woman of about 60 was glaring at me.  We went through the same rigmarole only she then commanded me, the first such occasion in countless times in that seat, and I’ll wager, the first such time ever, to turn to the wall and read the instructions.  I did so, and turned back and, with another glare, she started to walk away. “Childish,” I remarked to the chap beside me.  She heard me, spun around and snapped, “I’ll get the captain.” “OK,” I said and resumed reading. Twenty minutes later a couple of security guards appeared so I left with them.

No moaning so far but he went on the complain about people who didn’t think he should be granted special privileges on public flights.

He wanted a privileged seat but didn’t think he should do what is expected of those who sit in them.

Flight rules seem a pain to many people but if following the rules on flights was optional then flying would be a  mess.

Just imagine what a media storm there would be if an MP decided to ignore the rules and the rule enforces.

That afternoon in the Wellington office the manager came in. He’d just had an email from our managing director, then in New York. “That puts paid to it,” he wrote. “We’ll definitely buy a private jet.” This something is we’ve been considering. And so we shall. I’ve had enough of Air New Zealand’s infantilism.

Good move. I wonder if he tells his private pilot to ignore the control tower when it’s not convenient.

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14 Comments

  1. kittycatkin

     /  29th May 2015

    Control tower ? That’s for cissies. No real man takes any notice of that.

    A grim-faced 60 year old ? Er…how old is Bob Jones ?

    Reply
    • Sponge

       /  29th May 2015

      “A grim-faced 60 year old ”

      I remember in one of his books (Letters I think) he referred to the “hideously gargoyled” ANZ hostesses of the 70’s so he appears to have held back here.

      Reply
  2. Sponge

     /  29th May 2015

    I am 100% on Bob’s side in this. I travel ANZ regularly and once you have endured the cringeworthy safety briefings a couple of times there is no need to mindlessly watch them again and again. The hostess should have used some common sense – he is a regular traveller on this route and they know damn well where a Koru member is sitting. Knowing that he has travelled the route countless times they should have bloody well left him alone.

    Reply
    • Pierre

       /  29th May 2015

      IT WAS NOT THE NORMAL SAFETY BRIEFING. Otherwise I’d agree with you. It was the special briefing given to those in the emergency exits. And I’m with the airlines actions.

      Reply
      • Sponge

         /  29th May 2015

        It was the normal safety briefing for the exit row – its not like it changes from day to day. I have sat through the same briefing many, many times and could probably recite it damn near word for word (as I am sure Jones could also do) for all of the ANZ fleet except the 787 which I would read/pay attention to as I have not yet flown it. All they had to do was make sure that he knew he was in an exit row and leave it at that. Being all prissy over shit like this is just mindless. Common sense should be used but sadly that is being bashed out of people.

        Reply
  3. Pierre

     /  29th May 2015

    Sorry, but he has to respond. They ask “are you capable and willing…”. That may change from flight to flight even if he knows the words. He was being deliberately stubborn and ignorant. First time flyers (or nervous ones) nearby would also not be overly comforted by his refusal to listen. If he wanted to be left alone he should have picked a different row. No sympathy at all for him.

    Reply
  4. robby

     /  30th May 2015

    Sorry Bob, but the pilot is in charge here. Piss him off, and you’re gone. Build a bridge, and get over it.

    Reply
  5. robby

     /  30th May 2015

    After Bob being kicked off his flight for being a dickhead, I actually feel a lot more comfortable with domestic air travel. It is very reassuring to know that the pilot has the final say, and it is great that he takes his responsibilities so seriously. The pilot obviously knows that he is responsible for several souls, and has no tolerance for some rich prick who thinks he is better than everyone else.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  30th May 2015

      Hell hath no fury like a socialist discovering we are not all equal.

      Reply
  6. Farmerpete

     /  30th May 2015

    If Air NZ want their safety briefings to be taken seriously then they could start by taking them seriously themselves. They trot out nauseating, and puerile videos ad nauseum. The Christie Brinkley bikinis by the pool ad was so offensive to me I literally couldn’t watch it. Staff who present the safety instructions are usually bored and more focussed on themselves than the passengers.
    This episode was handled poorly by everyone involved and it didn’t have much to do with safety.

    Reply
    • I get as bored with safety spiels as anyone, but accept them as a sort of necessary part of flying with an airline.

      It’s important that all passengers follow any instructions of flight attendants. It might be tedious, but it’s a necessary part of maintaining order on flights.

      I get bored with queuing to have my luggage and laptop scanned. I’m bemused when I’m scanned for explosive residue as I was, again, a couple of weeks ago. But if I want to fly somewhere I put up with it.

      Following the instructions of flight attendants can’t be optional. If Gerry Bronwlee had done anything like Jones there would be hell to pay. Why should Jones get specially privileges? If he doesn’t want to be annoyed with exit instructions he can choose to sit somewhere other than at an exit.

      Reply
      • FarmerPete

         /  30th May 2015

        I didn’t suggest that instructions should not be followed. Only that they would be followed better if Air NZ took them more seriously themselves.
        Nor did I defend Bob Jones, (having met him once I can confirm he is irascible). I said it was badly handled by all parties (that would include Jones). It was a bad look all round.

        Reply
  7. Alan Wilkinson

     /  30th May 2015

    Nothing worse than a fool with a rule and we have battalions of them. Good on Sir Bob for a lingering salute to common sense, now illegal. We have succumbed to fascism in the name of safety, most of us willingly. There is no way safety was compromised by letting someone who has heard the official spiel a zillion times read his book in peace.

    Reply

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