Aided and abetted by a cabal of the usual National suspects

In Colin Craig’s political reputation may be in disarray, but he’s party’s best bet Vernon Small writes:

Bear in mind too the forces arrayed against him. It is not Labour or the Greens who are dismantling his party and his reputation, but an inside job aided and abetted by a cabal of the usual National suspects – whether sanctioned or not.

I doubt whether any official side of the party would be mad to go anywhere near sanctioning this but there are a number of indicators that ‘a cabal of the usual National suspects’ could be doing their best to do a dirty on Craig and the Conservatives.

It may be just one ambitious faction in the party but it tarnishes National as a whole if there’s a perception that it’s back to dirty politics as usual.

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6 Comments

  1. kittycatkin

     /  25th June 2015

    I am dubious, as I’d have thought that the Conservatives were no threat to anyone, given their failure to gain a single seat in Parliament and the remote chance that they ever would. They would probably have fizzed out as other new parties have before them. Remember Destiny, who were going to ‘rule and reign” over all aspects of NZ, starting with the ‘wealth and finance’ and ‘the social order’ by 2013 ? I think it was 2013, but it has long gone by. Who would risk so much to destroy a party that was such a failure that it would have done the job for them ?

    Reply
    • Pete Kane

       /  26th June 2015

      The “cabal of the usual National suspects” understand the “game” all too well.

      It’s about what happens to that 4% of the vote. It’s often described, mistakenly, as a wasted vote as if in effect it weren’t counted at all. In reality, it most certainly was counted, and distributed almost evenly between the current government and opposition. Andrew Little, for example, would not be there without that redistribution.

      I know what ifs can be a little tedious in politics. But, the fact was in 2014, a few more Mana (Internet/Mana) voters out of bed in TTT for their leader, then what makes up the current opposition would have grown by two. For Labour it would have been Maryan Street in and bye bye to Kelvin Davis. Parliament would also then graced by Hone Harawira, Laila Harre and Annette Sykes.

      NZ First, welcome to your world.

      Actually, the perceived fallout for Labour (by some of their leadership) of retaining someone like Street (and next Moana Mackey) at the expense of someone like Davis, was one of their drivers, amongst a few conflicting views, for Labour’s onslaught in TTT. And let’s not Labour’s tacit (and not so tacit) support from National and NZ First in that little adventure.

      Whoever the “usual National suspects” may be they understood then (TTT), and now, just how high the stakes are. All a little unfortunate for those of us who wouldn’t object to a change of government.

      Reply
      • Pete Kane

         /  26th June 2015

        To clarify the 4% means the 4% of the vote won by the Conservatives in 2014.

        Reply
        • Pete Kane

           /  26th June 2015

          Sorry again, correction this time, Maryan Street almost certainly not (on Labour’s vote) and Andrew Little a maybe depending on distribution cut off. Point remains things very tight and Davis for example was only going to make it through TTT. Too early in the morning.

          Reply
    • Depends what the motive was. Could be p[art political, part utu, with a dollop of sheer thrill of the hit job.

      Reply
      • Pete Kane

         /  26th June 2015

        That thrill sensation is definitely a factor (so dangerous to good judgement), but still there seem at least, aspects of strategy. Thing is, it’s easy to look for (or even expect) an overarching strategy from the ‘group’ when in fact it’s so often dispirit and competing strategies’ from different parts of the group.

        Reply

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