3D on Malcolm Rewa

3 News is promising revealtions on Malcolm Rewa tonight on 3D (6.30pm). They are promoting the news in advance:

Malcolm Rewa family member: ‘We know what went down

A member of Malcolm Rewa’s family has come forward with new evidence against him in the unsolved Susan Burdett murder case.

He has told 3D Investigates he is prepared to testify against Rewa in any fresh prosecution.

“I would give evidence,” the man told the programme. “We know what went down and how it happened.”

3D Investigates will tonight reveal fresh information about Rewa’s involvement in the 1992 rape and murder of Burdett in her Papatoetoe home.

The family member, one of two witnesses with new details, says he wants to apologise to the Burdett family.

“I apologise for what has happened. They lost a loved one and I wouldn’t like it to happen to my family. And I don’t mind helping the family.

“I should’ve been a man enough way back and come forward.”

Yes, he should have been man enough way back. But better very late than never.

Rewa, jailed in 1998 for attacks against 25 women, faced two trials for murdering Burdett. He was convicted of raping her, but neither jury could agree on whether he was guilty of murder.
The complicating factor in the Rewa case was that another man, Teina Pora, had previously been found guilty of killing her.

Pora spent twenty years in Paremoremo prison. Possibly because one or more people remained silent. Until now perhaps.

UPDATE after 3D screened – two pieces of information.

Susan Burdett murder: Witness saw Malcolm Rewa on the night

A witness who lived in a house just down the road from Ms Burdett at the time of the murder saw Rewa parked in his truck in her driveway on his own on that night, and that evidence has never been heard.

She says she opened the curtain on the night of the murder and saw Rewa parked in his truck in her driveway, on his own, with nobody else around.

Up till now, there has only been physical evidence – DNA of semen – connecting Rewa with Ms Burdett. There were no fingerprints, no eyewitnesses, and Rewa claimed in his defence that he was at home on the night.

So to now have an eyewitness who saw him in Ms Burdett’s street, on his own, without Mr Pora, is a breakthrough.

And:

In video the police took in 1992 at the scene of the crime, a bat can be seen on Ms Burdett’s bed. The prosecution has previously said the bat belonged to her.

“Yeah the old baseball bat,” says Mr Manapiri, “I first saw that when I come back from Australia.”

“[Rewa] had a Holden, and he took me up to Ruakaka on it – him and his daughter – and I seen that baseball bat quite often … it’s the old colour of the old baseball bat what he used to carry.

“That’s the one. And I seen it quite often. He used to carry it in his van and stuff like that too.

“He used to beat his dogs and he was in the gang, and I suppose that was his weapon.

“I’m telling you that’s his bat left at the scene and, you know, that shows that he did it.”

Mr Manapiri says he told the police at the time. He can even describe the policeman he spoke to, but it never appears in any of the police records

This looks like significant new evidence that may justify re-opening the case.

It also raises concernes that the Police may not have recorded important information given to them during the investigation.

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22 Comments

  1. jaspa

     /  23rd August 2015

    Pathetic cowards. We know it but we still allow it to happen.

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  24th August 2015

      I didn’t feel that there was any real evidence when we saw the story on the news. How could anyone identify aanyone’s baseball bat unless there was something very distinctive about it ? Where’s the proof of these stories ? Why would the police not bother to investigate the supposed story at the time ? Nobody would not want Rewa to be imprisoned for a crime that there was evidence of his doing. Sending Porou to prison for it would be pointless & would give Rewa a good laugh.

      I read that some woman-a well-educated, professional woman-married him in prison. How could she do such a thing, knowing what he’d done ?

      Reply
  2. BUCK WIT

     /  23rd August 2015

    one of the stranger cases of wrongful imprisonment. a young man admits the crime thinking the reward goes to his family, the cops are clearly sloppy in their work, and the consequence is 20 years of lost life. does not say much for the quality of the cops or the justice system

    Reply
  3. kittycatkin

     /  23rd August 2015

    He surely wasn’t dim enough to think that the reward would go to the killer or their family.The terms of rewards are that it doesn’t. The reward is for information leading to the criminal being caught; if it went to the criminal (or even someone claiming to be) there wouldn’t be much point. If the family thought that they’d have it, they must be incredibly stupid and greedy.

    The cops aren’t to blame if someone says they did it, tells when, where and how and keeps on saying it. He put his hand up-he was believed. There must have been enough evidence, even if it was circumstantial, to gain a conviction, especially if he was in the dock saying that he’d done it.

    Reply
  4. kittycatkin

     /  23rd August 2015

    I think that it must be remembered that he did approach the police and claim to be the killer. Did he think that they’d just hand over the reward, thank him for solving the case and send him on his way ?

    Reply
    • Mike C

       /  24th August 2015

      @Kitty

      Pora was a Mongrel Mob prospect who was arrested for doing something else, and he then told the Police that he was there when Susan Burdett was killed.

      I have mixed feelings about Teina Pora’s imprisonment, because being in jail saved him from a lifetime of gang involvement in crime, and he might well have gone on to eventually murder someone if he hadn’t been locked up.

      And before anyone else says it or gives me a downvote … I am well aware that what I just said in the paragraph above is pretty weird logic on my part. LOL.

      Reply
      • BUCK WIT

         /  24th August 2015

        @Mike C – i think you are about right on what and where Pora was headed. It certainly was a place of doing no good.

        Reply
        • kittycatkin

           /  24th August 2015

          I had always thought that, Mike, but it was reported that he had voluntarily said he’d done it.

          Reply
  5. Brown

     /  23rd August 2015

    Give the cops a break. They did 12,746 traffic stops to check stuff as contracted without useful results so are flat out not making a difference.

    Reply
    • Mike C

       /  24th August 2015

      @Brown

      There were 30 criminals arrested in that blitz on the weekend … so I would clasify that as being a success 🙂

      Reply
    • Stopping traffic can’t be part of a contract because it is unlawful – i.e. it injured the natural right of liberty of the public.

      Reply
      • DaveG

         /  24th August 2015

        UT I am happy to get pulled up and breath tested etc every few days, or weekly. This will help ensure, those on illegal substances, drunk, or driving defective vehicles are dealt with, making NZ roads far safer. A minor inconveniance.

        Reply
        • If you’re happy about being pulled up then the fact that it happens to you won’t make the roads any safer. The Crown’s “road safety” protection racket is based on fraud – the Crown lies about it’s authority to make law and it lies about what law actually is.

          Reply
          • kittycatkin

             /  24th August 2015

            I can’t make any sense of that. It most certainly isn’t a civil right to drive drunk, stoned or dangerously, have children with no proper restraints, have an unwarranted, dangerous vehicle and generally be a danger to yourself and other people.

            Nor is it a civil right to be a burglar or other criminal such as the police found and arrested. 30 criminals arrested and kept from pursuing their lives of crime for a while, at least. If you were a victim of crime, wouldn’t you have been pleased that the criminal had been caught ? Or would you have protested that this was unlawful ?

            It mosr certalnly is lawful to stop people who are doing all these things. Drunk and dangerous drivers do enough harm as it is, and if the police manage to stop some of them, then I’m all for it. I don’t mind being delayed for a few seconds.

            Reply
  6. Maureen W

     /  23rd August 2015

    I don’t feel any sympathy for Teina Pora – he got what he asked for and if one admits to crimes they didn’t commit, perhaps he was safer in jail than outside. I do have sympathy for Susan Burdett’s family though, they would have had more comfort in knowing that the right man went down for the crime committed against they family member.

    Reply
  7. Brown

     /  24th August 2015

    I wouldn’t go as far as Maureen although I have no doubt that Pora was just a developing thug in waiting. I remain uncomfortable with him doing so much time for what he didn’t do because the police are useless at real investigation. Fitting a case to a suspect has become common enough now to be a concern.

    @ Mike. I don’t care how many crims they arrest while tramping on the right of the innocent to go about their lawful business without harassment. In my younger days they needed cause to even stop you and I remain of a view that was as it should be – freedom has its price. The fact of so many crims being out and about points to problems with the penal service and those should be dealt with.

    Reply
    • Mike C

       /  24th August 2015

      @Brown

      If I had been pulled over on the weekend and had my car searched, I wouldn’t have had a problem with it because I don’t have any stolen property or illegal drugs inside my car 🙂

      I bet that the number of people arrested over the weekend would have been much higher, if the Police hadn’t advertised the blitz in the days leading up to it. LOL.

      Reply
      • kittycatkin

         /  24th August 2015

        Where were the drugs and stolen property,then, Mike ? (runs away very fast indeed)

        Reply
  8. Brown

     /  24th August 2015

    Well Mike, you have learned nothing from history and are part of the problem. In the US the cops will now stop you, take your money because they suspect you must be dodgy by having some money, keep it and wish you a good day. Getting it back is difficult and there’s no need to have drugs or allegedly stolen property.

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  24th August 2015

      It’s quite true; I was appalled. It’s not worth most peoples’ while to spend more than what was taken to try to get it back. The police and authorities are doing nicely out of this and it’s scandalising Americans. It doesn’t seem to be in all states, though. There seems to be little, if any, need to prove that the money is crime-related, and the cop is given a percent as a bonus.

      Thank God I don’t live in the Land of the Free where it’s in the constitution that all people are created equal and free in law.

      Reply

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