Supermarket conditions – parking on streets ban

Countdown has been battling business limiting Dunedin City for some time, but were yesterday consent to build a new supermarket in Mosgiel – with a number of restrictive conditions attached.

Otago Daily Times reports Mosgiel supermarket approved.

  • The new store, which will be more than 50% larger than the present Mosgiel Countdown
  • Two protected yew trees on the site will be retained
  • No retail tenancies, other than a ”coffee dispensary”, will be permitted on the site
  • The customer car park will be locked during non-trading hours
  • Pylon signage is no larger than 6m high and 2.2m wide
  • Heavy vehicle usage limited to Gordon Rd
  • Low-tone beeping technology will be fitted to forklifts, all of which will be electric-powered quieter models.
  • Install noise-reducing glazing to nearby residential properties

Despite the noise reduction measures neighbouring houses have to be double glazed.

On top of all of that is one of the silliest conditions I’ve seen.

  • Supermarket staff will not be allowed to park their cars on surrounding streets.

How can they police that? More importantly, how can they prohibit private citizens from parking on public streets? Are they only banned from parking on streets during their shift hours or at any time?

The Mosgiel Countdown has had a major battle – they won some, as the DCC had recommended limiting opening hours to 9 am – 6 pm, which would have been an anti-competitive limitation as the New World open s 8 am – 9 pm.

Some of the conditions are still quite restrictive. Will heavy vehicles be banned entirely from other adjoining streets or just while delivering to Countdown?

But the ban on staff parking on streets is surely contrary to basic citizens’ rights.

Leave a comment

21 Comments

  1. Mike C

     /  2nd October 2015

    Quite a number of those conditions above sound pretty wack 😦

    Makes you wonder if the Council members have got shares in New World, or have been promised free groceries for the next year by New World. LOL.

    Reply
  2. Supermarket staff will not be allowed to park their cars on surrounding streets.

    I would assume the point is that Countdown will have to reserve a certain amount of the car parks for staff parking.

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  2nd October 2015

      That sounds fair enough, I must say. If it’s a narrow street, this could be not only annoying but hazardous, It is maddening to be ‘parked in’ as sometimes happens. This has happened in our narrow old street when there’s a really big funeral in the church in the next street and they run out of parking spaces. It becomes a one way street for several hours and more than once residents have been unable to drive in-or out ! It can also be really annoying when every available parking space near shops is used by shop staff all day !

      Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  2nd October 2015

      It is surely the right of the citizens who live there not to have their streets used as thoroughfares, For some unknown reason, our former street was once designated a bypass for heavy vehicles (it was parallel to the main road) and, until the drivers became sick of this pointless, time-wasting detour and went back to going straight along the main road the residential street was awful to live in with the extra noise and the congestion from these large vans and such things.

      Reply
  3. rayinnz

     /  2nd October 2015

    You really have to wonder about the DCC, various scandals involving eye watering amounts of money disappearing, with only one man to blame and no chance getting it back
    Then there is this resistance to any new business without a major battle and no guarantee of getting over their line without impossible restrictions

    Reply
  4. Ummm… so how will the council identify staff cars? Sounds just a tad totalitarian. Will DCC Parking enforcement be in attendance all day on all the surrounding streets ticket dispensing devices at the ready? Or will tickets be issued on the say so of some stasi like local resident dobbing people in? Will drivers arriving and parking in street clothes need to card a “I’m not employed by Countdown” card???

    Shit that’s a good deal for the locals – insulating double glazing for free!

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  2nd October 2015

      Not really 🙂 I’d rather not have the double glazing and not have the noise.

      It would be annoying if there were cars parked all day, every day, during the shop’s opening hours outside one’s house. Not to mention the extra noise from all these drivers-especially if, as so many people do, they have loud car stereos. And with supermarkets being open (almost) all hours, the unlucky residents would have these cars coming and going all the time.

      Reply
      • Yip well if the land was zone as residential/retail then its just tough really…. the amount of noise at supermarkets is pretty minimal – I live near one a couple of times… and the advantages are you can walk to the supermarket, or pop over for a forgotten item easily, plus if you have teenagers you can see to getting them a part time job….. its a public road Kitty – so anyone can park….

        Reply
        • kittycatkin

           /  2nd October 2015

          The cumulative car noise from a site as large as this one seems to be could be quite bad-especially with car stereos. It really spoils the feeling of a residential street when it’s used as a thoroughfare for all sorts of vehicles, the constant noise is awful. And the nuisance of having a street lined with cars all the time would be awful-I’m glad that the people won’t have that, at least.

          It must be expected to be noisy or the double-glazing wouldn’t be an issue.

          Reply
          • Again Kitty if its residential/retail zone then it should just be expected. That why its zoned that way. The restrictions seem ott in my view…

            Reply
  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  2nd October 2015

    How close are the residents? Usually a supermarket occupies most of a block so there are not many close neighbours. Especially if it is in a commercial zone.

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  2nd October 2015

      Our nearest Countdown is now in a mixed street,houses and businesses, but before it moved it was in a mainly residential one;

      Reply
  6. It’s not about citizen’s rights, it’s about persons having no rights, only privileges granted by the state. The Crown is fundamentally a criminal organization which has no mandate to make law – the District Councils are only emulating its behaviour.

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  2nd October 2015

      ?

      Reply
      • When the Crown treats people as persons it fails to recognize their natural rights. The crime of fraud committed by the Crown is based on the it’s misrepresentation of the nature of sovereignty (sovereignty is essential for real legislation). The Crown insinuates that sovereignty is a function of accountability, but in English law (which was inherited by NZ) sovereignty is about wisdom, goodness, and power, and not accountability.

        Essentially the lies of the Crowns concern the role of deity in law. As well as misrepresenting sovereignty as accountability, the Crown misrepresents common law as case law, when in fact the origins of common law as theistic, with the dooms (judgments) of King Alfred the Great beginning with a Saxon version of the ten commandments.

        Reply
  7. kittycatkin

     /  3rd October 2015

    Another seripusly annoying thing about heavy vehicles using a formerly suburban street is that it means that the road surface is damaged and there are endless roadworks when it’s repaired.

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  3rd October 2015

      The repairs are, of course, paid for by the ratepayers whose street is being dug up all the time as potholes appear and the surface is worn off.

      Reply

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