Sad sign

I saw this sign in an Op Shop window in Dunedin:

SadSign

It’s hard to understand why people would shop lift at a charity run opshop where prices are very low.

If those who shoplift asked for help from the charity they woukld probably be given it.

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36 Comments

  1. jaspa

     /  13th December 2015

    I work at an SPCA shelter and you would be very surprised to know about how many people steal from there.

    Reply
    • Mike C

       /  13th December 2015

      @Jaspa

      What sort of stuff do people steal from the SPCA … are we talking about equipment or animals ???

      Reply
      • jaspa

         /  13th December 2015

        Not animals (touching wood). Money out of people’s handbags or from the office, dog food, cat food, vehicles, trailers, you name it. They bring bolt cutters with them at night. It’s pretty heartbreaking, when so many of us give our time for free, and people donate so much.

        If anyone comes to us and tells us they are unable to feed their animal for whatever reason, we give them food. So there is no need to steal.

        Reply
  2. Timoti

     /  13th December 2015

    The sign is sad. Especially being an op-shop. But it doesn’t have to be that way.
    With political will New Zealand could be the safest place on earth within months.
    The problem is too many believe to solve crime you must first understand its
    root causes. That is second on the list.

    Reply
  3. Brown

     /  13th December 2015

    I heard a Christmas mission charity saying that they now have to check all donated presents because of the nasty stuff that was being included. This shows that people are inherently good just as the atheists claim.

    Reply
    • @ Brown – Well, yes, and it might equally show that as atheism grows in society people become extrinsically or acquire more bad?

      Reply
    • Rob

       /  13th December 2015

      Are you saying it must have been an atheist?

      Reply
      • Brown

         /  13th December 2015

        Nope, just people pretending they are helping by dumping their crap for free. My retired minister friend says it was a problem in his parish back in the 1970’s so its hardly a new thing. Christians were clearly not above acting like arseholes when it suited but other Christians will call them out when they find out.

        Reply
  4. Timoti said it – the sign is sad.

    Looking on the bright side though – the sign is still there – it has not been stolen!

    Reply
  5. I don’t know what we do right now. But something we could do in the future is teach ethics in school. I’m not talking “crime and punishment”, which any child gets plenty of small-time experience in – often unfortunately in the form of “mistakes are wrong” – I’m talking about the theory and practice of ethics. And I don’t mean Christian Church morality or anything, except insomuch that ethics often boils down to many of the same basic tenets, one very important one being, “treat others as you would yourself be treated by others”.

    Of course, abject poverty, a disconnection from ‘community’ with its attendant sense of social responsibility, glorification of “the bad guy” in the media, lack of the ability to distinguish actual exploitive agencies in society from ‘charities’ et al doesn’t help …

    Reply
    • jaspa

       /  13th December 2015

      I teach ethics in the home. It it not the responsibility of the govt or anyone else.

      Reply
      • jamie

         /  13th December 2015

        Following that logic, does the state have any responsibility to teach anything at all?

        Why is it the state’s responsibility to teach mathematics, for example? Maths can be taught in the home, just as ethics can.

        Why is it the responsibility of the state to ensure the population has a certain level of mathematical literacy but not a certain level of ethical literacy?

        Even if we view the state’s educational responsibility as nothing more than preparing children for work, what good is an ethically illiterate workforce?

        Reply
  6. Kevin

     /  13th December 2015

    It’s because people who shoplift do it not because they are poor but because they are greedy.

    Reply
    • Mike C

       /  13th December 2015

      @Kevin

      FINALLY !!! 🙂

      I’m delighted to report that this is the first comment you have written with which I wholeheartedly agree with you. LOL.

      Reply
      • In 2010 benefit fraud cost the nation $67million, white collar crime $800million

        and we call the shoplifters “greedy”.

        Reply
        • jaspa

           /  13th December 2015

          So what would you call people who steal from hungry cats & dogs? I call them something that starts with a and ends with hole but each to their own.

          Reply
          • I’d call them “disturbed” and possibly “desperate”.
            I said I don’t know what to do about them.
            The positive remedy is usually cited as being education, I offered some thoughts on that.
            I imagine improving their incomes and living conditions could help?
            I guess your spca branch might apply for some funding to install extra security, surveillance cameras & alarm system or employ a security company or such like?

            I don’t know if people realise; we are now approaching a comparative situation to the “poverty crime” in England which resulted in transportation of large numbers of poor from the squalid slums to Sydney Cove and Tasmania.

            Sure, the squalid slums have satellite dishes. Yes, it is comparative.
            It’s ‘tertiary’ poverty in a world where we refuse to acknowledge tertiary human rights.

            Short of the Moon or Mars becoming the next Sydney Cove –
            “there is no more new frontier, we have got to make it here;
            We satisfy our endless needs, and justify our bloody deeds;
            In the name of yesterday; and in the name of God”
            – The Eagles

            Reply
            • jaspa

               /  13th December 2015

              You think that giving them more money will help them?

            • This entirely depends on who they are jaspa? Do you know who they are?

            • jaspa

               /  13th December 2015

              I do know one of the prime suspects – in this case a person who was ordered to work there by the court. He has shown up at my residence recently offering to sell me stolen building materials, I wouldn’t call him “disturbed” and certainly not “desperate”. I would probably use the word “chancer”.

            • jaspa

               /  13th December 2015

              And I should add that, as per his sentence, he has openly admitted going onto farms in the daytime, under another ruse, and then returning at night to steal equipment. I am pretty sure that giving him more money will not help matters.

            • Agreed. He needs imprisonment if he is genuinely dangerous, monitoring if not and/or rehab.

            • kittycatkin

               /  13th December 2015

              There’s a family in my home town…when I was thinking of living there again, I saw a house that I liked at a reasonable price and asked my friend (who has always lived there) what that street was like. Her reply was that the S———s lived in the next one. I decided not to bother going to look at the house.

  7. I observe that something about this sign just ain’t right. But I’m willing to reserve judgement.

    Reply
    • Mike C

       /  13th December 2015

      @Artie

      I’m safe … because I’m a girl. LOL 🙂

      Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  13th December 2015

      Is it that the grammar is very shaky and it should be ‘reserve’ not ‘observe’ ?

      Reply
      • Mike C

         /  13th December 2015

        @Kitty

        How is everything going with you since the loss of your hubby?

        Are you doing okay?

        Reply
    • Timoti

       /  13th December 2015

      Cowpoke, I think that Pete sucked me in.
      In my defence my gwamma is bad.

      Reply
  8. From a State House kid in the Far North married to a beautiful daughter in a family of 17 in Taneatua. We never were cold or hungry. before our marriage. Our parents weren’t church-goers but all of us kids were exposed to Church and Bible Class and enjoyed camps with our peer group during our formative years. We went to School in rural areas wearing hand-me downs from older siblings, but we we were in clean, pressed and washed clothes and were encouraged to nugget our shoes and keep them in a polished state. Both I and my wife were taught by our mothers how to cook, clean, wash and iron and much more. I learned about managing money by having to ask for “tick” from the butcher, the grocer and the milk and bread men who delivered their products to our homes ,and talking through budgeting with her. My wife and I both had really strong ties with our siblings which have lasted into their 80s and 70’s. I suppose our families were regarded as being poor. But we paid our way. No-one was arrested. let alone convicted for a criminal offence. Many of our children have really achieved much academically and in their contributions to society.
    But I am not here to boast about their achievements or the fact my wife and I started with nothing, worked within the rules, paid for everything, including our wedding, are in an enviable retirement situation to most, are both together in a real loving marriage and have wonderful grand-children to connect with and enjoy their success in life. Our abiding principle has always been to know what is important to have to grow in a happy and healthy environment and not to be bothered about acquiring status oriented things. People need to recognise what the important things are in life, maintain communication with each other, and realise that our limited lives are meant to be happy and healthy.

    Reply
  9. bjmarsh1 – the great thing about a personal story, so seldom seen on here, is that it can’t be challenged. It is sacrosanct in my opinion (and I happen to know a lot about personal stories). This is your truth and I thank you most sincerely and humbly for sharing it.
    My warmest regards to you this fine Sunday.

    Reply
    • Mike C

       /  13th December 2015

      @partisan

      Keep talking Reverend 🙂

      Reply
      • @ Mike C – the word “snide” comes to mind. It could be a superficial assessment on my part.

        Possibly you don’t recognise genuine heartfelt communication when you see it?

        That’s kinda sad. To paraphrase Shakespeare –

        “Tis better to have sided and lost than never to have sided at all”

        Bless You 🙂

        Reply
        • kittycatkin

           /  13th December 2015

          Tennyson, not Shakespeare. . ‘Tis better to have loved and lost/Than never to have loved at all. I think it’s from his ‘In Memoriam’ but can’t be bothered to read through it again to see as it’s very long..

          Reply
          • 🙂 KCK, this is meant very, very lightly, I hope it amuses you too – KCK, you sure know how to take the wind out of a gal’s sails!

            Having said that, you have every right to say what you want, and I don’t understand the thumbs down everyone is getting for their honesty?
            Obviously not my decision what other people do with their ratings.
            Just registering my general incomprehension is all.

            Reply
  10. Thank all of you. REally!

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  13th December 2015

      A friend sent me what were supposedly a wise woman’s words of wisdom-that it was better to marry a rich man whom you don’t love than a poor man whom you do-and it’s better to cry in a Porsche than in a bus wearing Salvation Army (clothes)

      I can’t agree. My response was that I’d rather wear the clothes the opshop had put aside for garage rags and live in a toolshed than be married to Donald Trump or someone like him !

      Reply

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