It didn’t just happen

A misleading Martyn Bradbury headline: That thing Key promised was unlikely to happen with the TPPA just happened

Beyond the spin that NZers would have a say about the TPPA, beyond the lies of how much money it will make us, beyond the fact it’s an American geopolitical strategy to counter China in the pacific – is the terrifying reality that the TPPA opens NZ up to foreign corporations suing us if domestic law costs them money.

Key say’s it’s unlikely to happen – it just did.

Except that it didn’t just happen under the TPPA.

The thing that is happening between Canada and the US is under the North American Free Trade Agreement and has nothing to do with the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement, which hasn’t yet been signed or ratified and hasn’t come into effect yet.

Bradbury goes on to sort of acknowledge this…

…by signing the TPPA and having it ratified by the necessary members John Key is signing away our ability to pass domestic law without costing us millions in legal fees and opening us up to potentially massive damage claims from unscrupulous corporates.

But as we know Bradbury’s frantic ranting is hard to take seriously. He is in the ‘trade deal bad’ and ‘corporation bad’ club.

I wonder how many members of the unions who support The Daily Blog (presumably financially) owe their employment to corporations?

And I wonder how many of them owe their employment to trade deals?

I suspect the jobs of some members of the Rail and Maritime Transport Union are at least partly reliant on imports and exports that happen because of trade deals.

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14 Comments

  1. Iceberg

     /  11th January 2016

    Don’t go there to critique Pete, just point and laugh like everybody else.

    Reply
  2. mrMan

     /  11th January 2016

    But it is happening under the ISDS clause of NAFTA, which is also in the TPPA, so it’s not really a stretch of logic. It’s also not the first action under an ISDS, or even under NAFTA. It is, I believe, the first time that it’s been the US getting sued and not vice versa.
    In a small nation that relies on international trade and investment it would be very naive to think that there will be no ISDS suits against the NZ government. I wouldn’t be surprised if there aren’t foreign Oil and Gas companies with writs prepared already.

    Reply
    • Iceberg

       /  11th January 2016

      If an investor in NZ has a legitimate claim against the NZ govt based on terms entered into by both parties, and they want the claim heard by a 3rd party, isn’t that better than withdrawing ambassadors, introducing sanctions, using a naval blockade or starting a trade or actual war?

      Reply
      • mrMan

         /  11th January 2016

        Because that’s what happens now right? There’s been plenty of restrictions on foreign investment in New Zealand and, as far as I can remember, there hasn’t been a naval blockade or a war.
        Without an ISDS the ‘real world’ response has been to suck it up and move on.

        Reply
        • Iceberg

           /  11th January 2016

          Of course there are restrictions, they’re known up front in NZ, but that’s not the point here is it? We’re talking about managing a breach of known and agreed terms.

          Reply
          • mrMan

             /  11th January 2016

            ISDN’s are for where legislation inhibits profit by an overseas corporation. Think of times in the past where the government has legislated against foreign investment in the face of public disapproval, then add a billion dollar lawsuit.
            Think plain packaging on cigarettes for example, at the moment that means a case to the WTO, post TPPA it’s a massive lawsuit that inhibits our right to make laws for ourselves.

            Reply
            • Iceberg

               /  11th January 2016

              There are thousands of trade agreements internationally, covering millions of transactions and investments every year. Investment protection has always been part of these and covered by international law. Living your life, or basing your arguments several standard deviations from the mean is extremist.

            • mrMan

               /  11th January 2016

              say’s mr ‘naval blockade’

  3. Iceberg

     /  11th January 2016

    So you’re left with…nonsense. I suspect where not having a debate about the TPP or ISDS, because there is no change in those that would suit you. It’s that you’re against anything your ridiculous icon Bradbury is against.

    Reply
    • mrMan

       /  11th January 2016

      I never read Bradbury, never watched him on the telly, or listened to him on the radio. Like all NZ political pundits (on both sides), he’s a twit.
      As for the TPP, it’s going to cost us more for Pharmac, our copyright laws will become America’s ( say goodbye to the huge amount of works that are public domain here and almost nowhere else, including Orwell and Flemming) and our government gets left open to corporate blackmail, and we get no trade concessions that we don’t have already. Yeah, whoo-hoo for the TPP.

      Reply
  4. Timoti

     /  11th January 2016

    “I wonder how many members of the unions who support The Daily Blog (presumably financially) owe their employment to corporations?”

    Yes, those nasty corporations are the devils spawn. A curse on mankind. I must thank one of them though, Aeomed intensive care equipment helped keep a desperately ill friend alive.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  11th January 2016

      what is your point re Aomed?The narrow portal you view the world through seems reliant on very selective ,personal anecdote.

      Reply
  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  11th January 2016

    Bradbury is an apoplectic goof ball who should look at how many cases NZ has initiated (and won) under WTO rules compared with how many have been lodged against NZ (none). But he won’t because he trades in abusive ignorance and that is what his followers want.

    Reply

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