Some serious snow

The blizzard in the United States has seen some serious dumps of snow – this should be compulsory viewing for New Zealand journalists before heading up the Northern Motorway (Mt Cargill) or the Crown Range to find a few wee flurries and a smattering of white stuff to plaster over the news here.

Reports confirm that it could be close to record snow falls in some parts of the US.

Dave Engelkemeyer uses a snow blower in front of his home on Allerton Hill in Hull, Massachusetts

I’ve experienced snow like that in Manhattan and Long Island, in the December 2003 nor’easter.

A woman digs out her car after it was blocked in by drifting snow during a blizzard in Portland, Maine

And that, I had to walk several kilometers on conditions like that (at night).

Cars are buried in snow near Hamden, Connecticut

But I haven’t seen anything quite like that before. Especially not in Dunedin. This is more typical of a Dunedin snowfall:

Robertson family's walk to the Playhouse in Dunedin. Photo Bruce Robertson

The worst I have experienced here is about a foot (3o cm) of snow in Central Otago in 1995, when it didn’t melt away for up to two weeks. That was exceptional for here and nowhere near as bad as it gets in the US.

Snow can be a big nuisance, and it can also be a lot of fun as this clip of Tian Tian the panda from the Smithsonian Zoo shows:

That’s very cool in more ways than one.

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13 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  24th January 2016

    We used to drive up Vancouver Island and see the Stop signs of the side roads just poking out above the snow wall. But the prairies got serious snow. Car tyres got frozen flat sections and if you pinched someone’s garage car park and got towed out into the street your car was just a mound in the snow for the rest of the winter. The plus side was that unlike England there was plenty of sun and you could go for a walk on the river if you dressed for -20 degrees.

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  24th January 2016

      My great-aunt lived in Ontario, and -20 was nothing to what they had. I loved Ontario, but the idea of 6′ snow and -40 (or less) was a turnoff. I think it once went down to -60.When I was a child, I heard that cars with nylon tyres would freeze flat where they touched the ground and go bump-bump-bump down the road. I later heard that this was an urban myth-then that it wasn’t and they really did. I’d love to see it; it seemed the funniest thing imaginable to us as children.

      I thought that -11 in the UK was horrible-and it was, as was winter in Belgium and Holland when the canals froze-I’d heard of it, and can say that I’ve seen it.

      Friends in Vancouver said that their wiinters were mild. I suppose that it’s all relative ! I was there in summer and it was sweltering.

      Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  24th January 2016

      ON the river ????

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  24th January 2016

        Yep. Frozen solid and treated like a park – Calgary in February.

        Reply
  2. Blazer

     /  24th January 2016

    It seems to be quite common for ice cold conservatives to never ever …thaw out.They’re almost …frozen in time and blind to the real world around them.Oblivious to climate change,human empathy, or charity ,I guess Hell will be the only place to warm them up.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  24th January 2016

      Hmm, I can see why the people around you look at you coldly, Blazer. They are waiting for Hell to freeze over before they can get a friendly smile out of you.

      You, Rob and Oliver are a real barrel of fun, furiously tilting st windmills like Don Quixote and moaning about the rest of the world getting on with its life. Transference, I think it is called.

      Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  24th January 2016

      Will someone hand me a needle and thread ? Blazer’s wit has made me spilt my sides laughing.

      Reply
  3. Blazer

     /  24th January 2016

    meanwhile earlier today….’Wilkinson charges in with his plastic sword with more quixotic generalisations ‘…try and be original ..Al.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  24th January 2016

      For you, why bother? There are many more deserving objects for my charity.

      Reply
  4. Blazer

     /  24th January 2016

    ‘Charity begins at home’…apparantly.

    Reply

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