Pride in the TPPA

John Key says that New Zealanders should feel proud of being a part of the TPPA we have been one of the primary forces behind the deal).

NZ Herald: TPP Signing: Historic signing gives Kiwis a chance to feel proud – Key

New Zealanders should feel immensely proud of being part of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, Prime Minister John Key said ahead of today’s historic signing in Auckland by 12 countries.

Mr Key said people had opposed the China free trade agreement in 2008 and the closer economic relations (CER) agreement with Australia in the 1980s and opponents of both had been proven totally wrong.

“In the end, for all the bluff and bluster and misinformation, TPP is no more than a free trade agreement with the first and third largest economies in the world,” he said, referring to the United States and Japan.

“I think people should feel immensely proud of TPP and actually excited by the opportunity it presents.”

Today’s programme

 9am Ministers welcomed to SkyCity with mihi whakatau (cut-down powhiri with no karanga)
 9.30am Ministers meet privately, chaired by NZ Trade Minister Todd McClay
 11.30am Signing of TPP documents 
• Noon Press conference.

The Herald editorial also promotes the pride angle: NZ can take pride in TPP deal on trade

Looking back, it is hard to recall a greater diplomatic achievement than the comprehensive trade and investment agreement that will be signed by representatives of 12 countries in Auckland today. The post-war creation of the United Nations in which New Zealand Prime Minister Peter Fraser played a role may be as proud for those who remember it. The Trans-Pacific Partnership is directly in that tradition.

It represents another advance on the principles of the World Trade Organisation, formerly the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (Gatt) that was one of the multi-lateral institutions formed by nations seeking world peace and prosperity after two devastating wars.

The TPP became hard work once the United States was in and, more recently Japan. New Zealand’s hopes that agricultural tariffs and subsidies might be swept away in a “gold standard” agreement were dashed in dealing between the big two, along with Canada’s protection of its farmers.

But the fears of many in New Zealand that pharmaceutical purchasing and ICT innovation would be sacrificed for a deal did not eventuate.

The protesters who will be out in force today ought to acknowledge this even if they really think the US will be able to impose unacceptable conditions before the deal is ratified.

The protesters are protesters, not balanced evaluators.

Their over-riding concern remains that the TPP gives investors the right to sue governments for damages before international tribunals. But this is not a one-way street. New Zealand companies would have the same rights against capricious government actions in countries whose politics are a lot less reliable for investment than New Zealand’s. The rights are designed to encourage the international investment that spreads wealth in the world

The deal being signed in Auckland today embraces 40 per cent of the global economy and covers much more than trade. It covers the range of business rules and governing principles that the WTO has been trying to establish.

It is an agreement of historic global significance and New Zealand is hosting the signing in recognition of the role it has played. It might also bid to host a permanent secretariat if one is established. The drive for global prosperity could not be in better care.

It is an agreement of historic global significance, with New Zealand the current focal point.

 

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16 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  4th February 2016

    ‘, TPP is no more than a free trade agreement with the first and third largest economies in the world,” he said, referring to the United States and Japan.’
    blatant lie…it is much more than that,and not a free trade agreement.Straight from the Crosby/Textor manual.
    So its not about emerging markets then.Japan and the U.S are technically insolvent.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  4th February 2016

      Blazer, instead of acting the ranting moron why don’t you detail for us why it is not a free trade agreement? We are all ears.

      Reply
      • Pantsdownbrown

         /  4th February 2016

        Blazer only has slogans…….never comes up with reasoned debate.

        Reply
      • Blazer

         /  4th February 2016

        this is tedious- it has 6 out of 30 chapters specific to trade,so…80% of the agreement is not about free trade.If as you and Key suggest it is in fact a free trade agreement,surely it would have been called the Trans Pacific Free Trade Agreememt…understand!

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  4th February 2016

          You are tedious. I expect explicit detail, not vague crap. Even one will do for a start.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  4th February 2016

            that is explicit…comprehension not your strong point I see.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  4th February 2016

              Pathetic little troll. Shouldn’t you be back at school?

            • Blazer

               /  4th February 2016

              usual response…from Angry Al…take your pick…stupid,moron,troll,idiot…always,always goes for the messenger not the message….not hard to guess …why!

            • Pantsdownbrown

               /  4th February 2016

              Um…….because you don’t have a message?

            • Rob

               /  4th February 2016

              There was a post in here the other day about it’s always the left that goes for name calling and abuse. I’ve been called a troll, idiot, stupid etc by those we’ll term as the right. Lot in here appear to think a difference of opinion to theirs is simply loony or trolling. Sometimes it appears to be all they have.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  4th February 2016

              Don’t be disingenuous, Rob. Blazer is a troll not because he has a different opinion but because he won’t and/or can’t engage in any meaningful discussion of its basis. He just keeps parroting his slogans and is a waste of space and time.

              Originally, but rather less now thankfully, you merely made rude comments and never engaged in anything constructively either. That accounts for at least some of the responses you got.

          • Goldie

             /  4th February 2016

            For God’s sake – don’t engage with Blazer. He is a troll.
            Ignore the trolls.

            Reply
      • Iceberg

         /  4th February 2016

        I fear it’s not an act.

        Reply
  2. kittycatkin

     /  4th February 2016

    I’d rather have Blazer than Timoti, given a choice. Timoti is a vicious bully who resorts to personal abuse and insults. I couldn’t believe the lengths he went to to try to make me prove the source of my income. Did he really think that I’d be so unnerved by the threat of a private detective that I’d tell him private things like that ? What good would it have done him, anyway ? He doesn’t know me.I’m surprised that he didn’t want me to send him my bank statements, copy of insurance policies and a valuation of the house :-/

    Reply

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