Homs in ruin

Drone footage of the devastation of Homs as a result of the Syrian civil war has been getting some attention.

Homs was the third largest city in Syria with a population of about 700,000.

Before:

homs_collage

During:

onotkil

After:

Man wreaking terrible destruction on man, women and child.

This is far from the first time this sort of ruin has been self inflicted.

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15 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  5th February 2016

    dark humour at its worst!..’This is far from the first time this sort of ruin has been self inflicted.’

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  5th February 2016

      I didn’t see it as humour, dark or light, but as irony and a sad commentary on human nature.

      Reply
  2. Oliver

     /  5th February 2016

    You can blame neolibirlism and corporatist for this.

    Reply
  3. Brown

     /  5th February 2016

    Muslims wreaking terrible destruction on man, women and child.

    The original Corban of wine fame left Lebanon for NZ in the 1860’s to escape persecution. He was a Marionite Christian. This annoying tendency of one politicized religion to blow up stuff is hardly a modern problem but does have an identifiable start date and perpetrator. Mustn’t mention the name or talk about it though.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  5th February 2016

      Guy Fawkes (/ˈɡaɪ ˈfɔːks/; 13 April 1570 – 31 January 1606),[a] also known as Guido Fawkes, the name he adopted while fighting for the Spanish, was a member of a group of provincial English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

      Reply
      • kittycatkin

         /  5th February 2016

        Some English Suffragettes were foiled in an attempt to blow up a full theatre because the then PM was known to be going to attend the performance. They left a canister of gunpowder near the stage and threw lit matches and petrol into the projection booth, which contained highly flammable film reels. Had this succeeded, it would have been the biggest mass murder in English history. Photos of the many buildings that were bombed by militant suffragettes look like the aftermath of the blitz.

        Reply
        • kittycatkin

           /  5th February 2016

          Brown seems not to have heard of the Troubles in Northern Ireland. My aunt automatically checked the car for wires before she got in. My grandmother saw pieces of bodies being raked out of trees after one bombing, I forget which one. It wasn’t rare to see the pavement being washed down with waterblasters to remove the blood and bits of bodies that were too small to be recovered. The blast that killed Mountbatten blew the back door of the holiday house off its hinges when my mother and aunt were sitting in the kitchen. My mother and stepfather were sitting in the country somewhere when bullets started flying all round them (nothing personal, they were just unlucky enough to be in the wrong place-and lucky enough not to be hit)

          My aunt and grandmother came to stay with us in the 70s. One morning, there was a noise in the street and my mother looked out. Her sister’s instinctive reaction was to sit up in bed and shout ‘Get away from that bloody window, you stupid bitch !!!’ (my aunt didn’t swear as a rule, I must say) before she remembered that she wasn’t in Ulster. She laughed at herself, but it was shaky laughter. In Ulster, if you were seen looking, there was a good chance that you’d cop a bullet then or a Molotov cocktail through your window one night,and no matter what was going on outside, you kept your head down and heard and saw nothing.

          Reply
          • kittycatkin

             /  5th February 2016

            . I wonder who Brown is thinking of. There are so many whom that description would fit in many countries and centuries.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  5th February 2016

              Brown views the world through a narrow portal.He seeks affirmation of his bias.Unfortunately for him ,history and reality present a formidable counter to his prejudices

            • Brown

               /  5th February 2016

              Whatever you say Blazer and Kittycatkin. The other religious stuff is small fry, tiny, whitebait. I was living in England while the IRA were doing stupid stuff but never felt that it was personal. They wanted to sort out Ireland, not conquer Western Europe. Even the worst parts of Norther Ireland wouldn’t ever be confused with much of the shambles that is the Middle East (unless you are Blazer or Kittycatkin).

              There is one religion that seeks total political control, just one. Mustn’t mention the name or seek to explain its shortcomings.

            • Blazer

               /  5th February 2016

              “The crusade, first and foremost, was a war against Muslims for the defense of the Christian faith …. They began as a result of a Muslim conquest of Christian territories.” Madden wrote that the goal of Pope Urban was that “[t]he Christians of the East must be free from the brutal and humiliating conditions of Muslim rule.”[14]

              After the 1291 fall of Acre, European support for the Crusades continued despite criticism by contemporaries (such as Roger Bacon, who believed them ineffective: “Those who survive, together with their children, are more and more embittered against the Christian faith”).[31] According to historian Norman Davies, the Crusades contradicted the Peace and Truce of God supported by Urban and reinforced the connection between Western Christendom, feudalism, and militarism. The formation of military religious orders scandalised the Orthodox Byzantines, and crusaders pillaged countries they crossed on their journey east. Violating their oath to restore land to the Byzantines, they often kept the land for themselves.[3][32][33] The early People’s Crusade instigated a pogrom in the Rhineland and the massacre of thousands of Jews in Central Europe; during the late 19th century, this crusade was used by Jewish historians to support Zionism.[34] The Fourth Crusade resulted in the sacking of Constantinople, effectively ending any chance of reconciling the East–West Schism and leading to the fall of the Byzantine Empire to the Ottomans. Enlightenment historians criticized the Crusades’ misdirection—that of the Fourth in particular, which attacked a Christian power (the Byzantine Empire) instead of Islam. David Nicolle called the Fourth Crusade controversial in its “betrayal” of Byzantium,[35] and in The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Edward Gibbon wrote that the crusaders’ efforts would have been more effective improving their own countries.[3]

            • kittycatkin

               /  6th February 2016

              I wouldn’t call what the IRA did ‘stupid things’. Bombings and mass murder are a bit more than that, I think. Deadly would be a better word. They’d have no mercy on you if you’d happened to get in their way. If you’d been in Ulster and gone out with a Catholic girl, you would have been lucky if all that happened to you was ‘knee-capping.’

              If you mean Islam, say it. We all know that you mean it.

  4. The middle picture is of Kiev’s Independence Square in the Ukraine, I think.

    Reply

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