Laziness a cereal killer?

When I grew up breakfast consisted of either  toast or cereal.

Cereals where Weetbix, Rice Bubbles, Corn Flakes, Puffed Wheat (not fussed) or oats cooked as porridge (yuk).

Times and diets are changing. All of the above (except I don’t recall seeing Puffed Wheat for yonks) are still available but breakfast cereals have diversified immensely, especially when you include various types of muesli.

But cereal consumption is reducing significantly, at least in the US. New York Times reports Cereal, a Taste of Nostalgia, Looks for Its Next Chapter

Since the late 1990s, its popularity has been slowly fading. Sales, which totalled $13.9 billion in 2000, dipped last year to about $10 billion.

Younger generations are less interested in eating cereal for breakfast – many because of the hassle cleaning up afterwards (a spoon and a plate), and many because they don’t eat breakfast or don’t have it at home.

Younger consumers are not as attached to cold cereal for breakfast as their forebears, analysts and cereal makers agree. They either don’t eat breakfast at all, or eat it somewhere other than home.

And for many cereal eating is too much work:

The dream of all these companies is to capture the all-powerful and elusive millennial eater, who just isn’t all that into cereal for breakfast. It’s just too much work, for one thing. Almost 40 percent of the millennials surveyed by Mintel for its 2015 report said cereal was an inconvenient breakfast choice because they had to clean up after eating it.

But…

And when they do eat breakfast, a bowl of cold cereal is often replaced by hot grains, smoothies, yogurt or breakfast sandwiches.

That’s contradictory. Sandwiches are as much effort as cold cereals, and hot cereals and smoothies are more work, especially cleaning up liquidisers.

Has anyone tried those new things where you have to buy three and get pots as well, and they turn fruit and vegies into liquid? I mostly prefer to eat fruit in it’s most natural form.

And then there’s the other end of the breakfast cuisine scale.

Cereal manufacturers are starting to catch on. Recently, Kellogg paid a young, culturally diverse group of chefs to create dishes using its cereals. Among them was Danny Bowien, the man behind Mission Chinese Food in New York and San Francisco, and a lifelong Corn Flakes fan. For a special breakfast menu he served in December, Mr. Bowien matched Frosted Flakes with matcha milk and green tea powder, and poured bacon-infused soy milk over Corn Pops, topping the dish with a fried egg.

Kyle Mendenhall, the executive chef of the Kitchen, a restaurant group in Boulder, Colo., likes to pour cream or whole milk over Honey Nut Cheerios, the nation’s top-selling brand.

So is the human race getting lazier and wanting others to do more work for them?

Time will tell whether the the home breakfast cereal market is killed off by laziness.

 

Leave a comment

64 Comments

  1. Oliver

     /  23rd February 2016

    It can’t possibly be due to laziness. I think every sane person here would agree that cereal is by far the easiest meal to make.

    One reason that cereal is unpopular because the media keeps spreading those stupid diet messages that carbs are bad for you, make you fat etc..

    The other reason is that there are more options out there for breakfast. Cereal isn’t that nutritious, it has good carb but lacks protein therefore it isn’t a complete meal.

    The kids now days are eating gluten free muesli with fat fee sugar from Greek yogurt and organic fruits. And fair trade coffee.

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  23rd February 2016

      I can’t see how sandwiches can be easier than tipping some breakfast cereal into a bowl and pouring milk over it.

      Pete-puffed wheat is still made ! I used to love puffed wheat !

      Reply
  2. Robby

     /  23rd February 2016

    Just speaking for myself, two pieces of toasted vogels & a coffee are far less messy than a bowl of cereal, when eaten in the car on the way to work 😉

    Reply
  3. Blazer

     /  23rd February 2016

    ‘When I grew up breakfast consisted of either toast or cereal.’…toast or cereal….we would have killed for toast or cereal where I grew up in Yorkshire,the paste off the peeling wallpaper was a …treat for us…!

    Reply
    • kittycatkin

       /  23rd February 2016

      Paste off peeling wallpaper ? Luxury ! We’d have killed for wallpaper paste. In our house we were lucky to have the loose gravel off the road for breakfast ! And a smell of the tar to give it a bit of flavour. We used to dream about old wallpaper paste.

      Tell that to the kids today, and they wouldn’t believe you.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  23rd February 2016

        loose gravel and tar….my god if only!….we never ever saw gravel…..mud,with a pat of horse dung for flavour was an absolute treat in my day!

        Reply
        • kittycatkin

           /  23rd February 2016

          Mud and horse dung ? You were millionaires compared with us ! We used to lie in bed and hope that tomorrow we’d have mud and horse dung for breakfast. We used to lick the bricks on the house down the road and finish off with one pine needle between the 97 of us-and that were on a good day, sitha.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  23rd February 2016

            ooooooh..kitty I surrender …!!thats unusual.

            Reply
            • kittycatkin

               /  23rd February 2016

              I’m laughing too much to continue 😀

            • kittycatkin

               /  25th February 2016

              On our birthdays, Dad used to tak us to t’drycleaners an’ let us sniff the steam from t’vents as a birthday treat.

  4. Oliver

     /  23rd February 2016

    When I was a kid we had these things called fruit trees. We would pick the fruit off and it it for breakfast on the way to school. Apple, Apricots, kiwi, bananas, mangos etc..

    Reply
  5. kittycatkin

     /  23rd February 2016

    We had porridge in winter, which I didn’t like much as it was Creamota. Now I do, because when I make it now, it’s rolled oats that have a nice texture.

    We also had things like bacon and eggs.

    The breakfast cereals that I remember were puffed wheat (please tell me that that hasn’t been discontinued), cornflakes, Weetbix, rice bubbles, Cocopops, Honey Puffs, muesli and that one that was like crushed Weetbix.

    Sergeant Dan the Creamota Man/Knocks up another century/Creamota gives him (lots of strength ?)/And extra energy.

    My mother found one of those plates in a curio shop some years ago, and gave it to me…but it met with an accident (snf)

    Reply
  6. Kevin

     /  23rd February 2016

    If you think porridge is yuk you must have not been cooking it right. Today you can get satchets that make making it a lot easier. Just empty the satchet in a bowel, cover with milk, and zap in the microwave for 45 seconds. Stir, and then repeat for another 45 seconds. If you want to stick with the old fashioned cook on the stove method a pinch of salt is essential as it keeps it from tasting bland. Also use milk not water, stir constantly to avoid lumps, and serve with brown sugar and honey.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  23rd February 2016

      wow,the winner of Master Chef makes an appearance…whats the encore…how to boil …an ,,egg?

      Reply
      • Kevin

         /  23rd February 2016

        When boiling an egg always start, as my grandmother taught me, with cold water, to avoid the egg cracking. Start the timer when the water has begun boiling. Personally I like the yolk cooked cooked but still a bit gooey in the middle. Serve sprinkled with salt and pepper and lightly browned toast.

        You’re welcome.

        Reply
        • mrMan

           /  23rd February 2016

          If you boil an egg with a cold start the yolk can settle on the bottom of the egg, so that when you peel it you can see the yolk through the white, and when you slice it the yolk is off-centre. But in boiling water the yolk is pushed to the centre before the white coagulates.
          To avoid the egg cracking make sure they are room temperature, and lower them carefully. Add vinegar to the water to set the white if it leaks.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  23rd February 2016

            how come sometimes a just boiled egg is easy to peel…and sometimes its not!!

            Reply
            • Mike C

               /  23rd February 2016

              After you have boiled them … [That’s getting ridiculous and totally unnecessary – PG]

            • Blazer

               /  23rd February 2016

              pee on them…I usually…sit on ..them!..waiting for them to ..hatch…must be doing something wrong.

            • Blazer

               /  23rd February 2016

              geezus Pete don’t take that more mod needed b/s seriously!

            • mrMan

               /  23rd February 2016

              Also, it you censor a post, don’t leave the post below that makes it obvious what was said.

            • kittycatkin

               /  23rd February 2016

              Perfect Boiled Eggs-Can’t Fail.

              Start them in cold water.

              Bring them to the boil.

              REMOVE them from rhe element and let them sit in the hot water for however many minutes you want them cooked .

              If you want them hard boiled, put them in cold when they come out of the hot water-this tends to make them easier to peel.

              If by chance one starts to leak, put a nice big nail into the water-it stops it.No, not a fingernail unless you’re Edward Scissorhands. 😀

            • mrMan

               /  23rd February 2016

              Does it have to be a copper nail?

            • kittycatkin

               /  25th February 2016

              No, I used to use an ordinary large nail-like a fence nail. Now that I do them the above way, it’s not a problem. Salt works if it’s not a major crack..

            • kittycatkin

               /  23rd February 2016

              Mike, I honestly thought that you meant that it was easier to peel the eggs when they’d been boiled (blows tea over keyboard)

              Two eggs were walking down Piccadilly during the Blitz.

              They were both shelled 😀 😀 😀

            • Mike C

               /  23rd February 2016

              😀 😀 😀

            • kittycatkin

               /  25th February 2016

              Still laughing at the image of someone trying to peel a raw egg…

            • mrMan

               /  23rd February 2016

              Because when an egg is fresh the white is firm and as they age the white breaks down and goes watery. When you boil an older egg the yolk falls apart, this is also why some eggs disintegrate when you poach them.

          • Kevin

             /  23rd February 2016

            Thumbs up.

            Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  23rd February 2016

          Nah, just prick the blunt end with a sharp knife and drop it in the electric kettle. Bring to boil and let it sit in the hot kettle for four minutes, fish it out ready to eat and reboil the kettle for your tea.

          Reply
          • kittycatkin

             /  23rd February 2016

            What if the shell cracks ?

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  24th February 2016

              It doesn’t if you prick the right end properly because the hole lets out the gas that would otherwise expand and break the shell when heated quickly.

          • mrMan

             /  23rd February 2016

            That just makes you sound like you live alone, for some reason. It’s kinda sad.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  23rd February 2016

              Nope, I just reduced it for you and simplicity. Normally I’m cooking 4 for 2.

            • mrMan

               /  23rd February 2016

              it wasn’t the number, it was the image of a man throwing an egg in the jug because it’s easier than putting a pot on to boil.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  24th February 2016

              Much easier and quicker. Also saves water and electricity.

          • jamie

             /  23rd February 2016

            While I admire your survival skills with the kettle, Alan, for the best cuppa one should never make tea with anything but the first boil.

            Reply
            • Robby

               /  23rd February 2016

              One should also keep their teabags in a sealed container, and in the fridge…

          • Rob

             /  23rd February 2016

            You do realize that eggs aren’t washed before you get them, they’re only polished. Hope you’re washing them before using the same water for tea.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  24th February 2016

              Boiling water will kill any bugs better than washing.

    • kittycatkin

       /  23rd February 2016

      I have made it in the microwave-oats and boiling water-nearly as easy as the sachets and much, much cheaper-and no horrible saucepan to wash.

      Creamota is too lacking in texture for me, I infinitely prefer rolled oats.

      Reply
      • mrMan

         /  23rd February 2016

        Fill the oat pan with COLD water, and in a wee while you can just pour it out into a sieve. Hot water sticks it to the pot, but cold releases it.

        Reply
        • kittycatkin

           /  23rd February 2016

          Why bother when you can microwave it ?

          Reply
          • For me it’s because stove top cooked porridge is very much better than any microwaved attempt. Maybe it’s my imagination but I can tell the difference; unlike rice which to me tastes the same however cooked.

            Eggs – boil = 4 minutes precisely, fried = over easy, poached = best with squeeze of lemon but any vinegar suffices, scrambled = barely touched, omelette = must be well whisked and done in olive oil and butter. ” When there’s an egg in the house, there’s a meal in the house!”

            Can’t be bothered with muesli – far too much munching too early in the day , but if forced to do cereal it’s porridge or weetbix only.

            Reply
            • mrMan

               /  24th February 2016

              Stovetop porridge made with whole rolled oats is, to me, like a risotto.
              The act of stirring it creates a creaminess that you can’t get from a microwave. It’s a texture thing.
              If you can be bothered, it is improved greatly by soaking the oats in water over night, so say’s a great chef I worked with, never tried it myself only because I’ve never gone to bed knowing I’d want porridge in the morning.

              (also I don’t have a microwave, not even when I was raising babies)

            • Oats soaking releases the milk and it is preferable, just not summit I can be bothered with

  7. rayinnz

     /  23rd February 2016

    Couple of chops (hockey sticks) and eggs when we were mustering, my old dad was a sausage man all his days except for the bacon and eggs during the war, lasted till he was 90
    Now it is toast in summer and porridge in winter for me, avoid muesli as it seems to be a dentists delight

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  23rd February 2016

      onya Ray..btw how many Barry Crump books have you read,I ‘m still looking for #27 edition of Footrot Flats,I bet you have the whole series.

      Reply
      • kittycatkin

         /  23rd February 2016

        My great-uncle who was running the farm when he was in his late 80s until the IRA broke in and held him all night with a knife to his throat used to eat a dozen eggs for breakfast After the IRA incident, the family made him leave the farm and let someone else run it.

        Reply
        • kittycatkin

           /  23rd February 2016

          Fried eggs. That whole family lived to advanced ages, too, all 11 of them.

          Reply
        • Blazer

           /  23rd February 2016

          why would they hold a knife to his throat ..all night?Why not just shoot him in the back of his legs?

          Reply
  8. Mike C

     /  23rd February 2016

    Bacon and Eggs

    Reply
  9. Mike C

     /  23rd February 2016

    I am just trying to stay awake until “Click Bait” gets in here.

    She seems to be a bit delayed as a result of putting the kids and husband to bed.

    It’s time for AlanW to know what she did several months ago.

    Reply
  10. kittycatkin

     /  23rd February 2016

    Four cracker biscuits with marge and Vegemite.

    Reply
  11. Chris Wagner

     /  24th February 2016

    My ex mother in law who is 92 has been in a study control group since age 80 to try to access the common denominator’s of longevity. All they came up with so far is that the healthy survivors all ate Weetbix or porridge every morning.

    Reply
  12. Laziness is a cereal killer all right. Leastwise it is where my muesli is concerned. Laziness on the part of manufacturers. I use the cheapest, Budget Tropical, which has a wider variety of cereals and more dried fruit than any other I can find for 1/2 – 2/3 of the cost.

    Bulked up with crushed Weetbix or some All Bran and extra dried fruit and, over a period of time – several purchases – I’ve paid about the same for 1.2kgs of muesli as I would for 650grms of that thief Hubbard’s various concoctions.

    I’ve analysed his ‘Berry Berry Nice’ quite carefully, although not scientifically only anecdotally. I find a combination of 2 cheap cereals, corn flakes and rice bubbles I think they are, dusted in a fake tasting Berry flavoured talc of some sort. Not an actual dried berry anywhere to be found.

    But WTF, he’s a business leader, who am I to complain?

    One good thing, ‘cereal is a laziness killer’ insomuch as I put some more effort into creating my own …

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  24th February 2016

      ‘ that thief Hubbard’s various concoctions.’….can’t condone this nonsense,your choice ,to buy or not to buy.Business’ exist to make profits ,so you can accuse them all of ‘theft’.

      Reply
      • @ Blazer – Agreed; an extreme statement by orthodox capitalist standards. My apologies to Dick and Diana Hubbard.

        “Comparatively poor value IMHO” is more accurate. Thanks for not dobbing me in.

        People say “the market will correct” and such like, but back in the 19th century it didn’t stop bread manufacturers bulking up their loaves with chalk and crap. All the cheap bakeries did it and the poor couldn’t afford anything better …

        There are many examples of this sort of thing – the early 20th century “Muckrakers” campaigns about meat processing in the USA comes to mind – where the only way to “correct” it seems to be government inspection and regulation?

        I heard the other day on the radio and item about bringing “industry regulation” back into the plumbing trade, due to the inferior quality and sometimes unsafe condition of cheap imported products.

        Myself, I think profit and its association with greed and cost cutting – nowadays so often labour cost – is the Achilles Heel of strictly capitalist theology.

        Reply
        • mrMan

           /  24th February 2016

          I wouldn’t say that Upton Sinclair was a muckraker, his agenda was working conditions, his discoveries were sanitary.

          Reply
          • Hence the quotation marks mrMan, which I suppose should be inverted commas? ‘Muckrakers’, the generic name for newspaper and magazine social issue campaigns of the era, perhaps rather like “blogging” today?

            Actually, I wonder if there is a public forum affecting government policy like ‘The Muckrakers’ apparently did? In the absence of MSM current affairs have we left it to Roy Morgan and Colmar Blunton?

            “In 1906, Sinclair acquired particular fame for his classic muckraking novel, The Jungle, which exposed conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry, causing a public uproar that contributed in part to the passage a few months later of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act”

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upton_Sinclair

            Reply

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