Suffocating mainstream media

Newspaper circulations continue to slide around New Zealand, which won’t surprise anyone.

The latest Press Audit results are here.

Twelve month movements:

  • Dominion Post -13.70%
  • The Press -8.32%
  • NZ Herald -5.69%
  • Otago Daily Times -3.51%

I’m part of the ODT decline, I dropped my long time subscription last year.

All but one provincial newspaper are down, the exception being the Northern Advocate which rose 1.59%.

But this is just circulation (and large reductions in print advertising revenue). All the large newspapers also have online sites.

It may seem obvious why print news is in decline, but one person claims to be suffocating mainstream media.

One thing is for sure, no one wants yesterday’s papers.

My audience is growing. I guess you have to be relevant and reflect society. The mainstream media have not done that and their sales are sliding to oblivion.

I hope to be able to help suffocate them further.

The Dominion Post is dead on its feet. They have less circulation daily than I have readers on Whaleoil.

http://www.whaleoil.co.nz/2016/03/the-future-of-newspapers

Except that comparing print circulation with online readership is a bit silly – the Dominion Post has a substantial online readership via Stuff.

Alexa New Zealand rankings:

  • Stuff: 6
  • NZ Herald: 10
  • Otago Daily Times: 123
  • Whale Oil: 170

Even a tumbleweed provincial ODiTy outranks the niche blog.

(Alexa is only a rough indicator but that surprised me).

Leave a comment

23 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  2nd March 2016

    I’m surprised Stuff rates above the Herald. Fluff rating above journalism obviously and maybe bureaucrats have more internet time than businesses.

    Reply
    • Iceberg

       /  2nd March 2016

      Maybe lots of people have Stuff as their browser homepage. Everytime they visit the Web, Stuff scores a hit.

      Reply
      • kiwi dave

         /  2nd March 2016

        Maybe it’s because Stuff is one of the many online sites (mostly overseas) that I look at. NZH is not one – it’s got too much crap, trivia and irrelevant gossip.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  2nd March 2016

          You think? I would have said the other way around.

          Reply
          • kiwi dave

             /  2nd March 2016

            NZH doesn’t have much, if anything, on anything S of jafaland

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  2nd March 2016

              I go to Stuff first, read any high interest main news items, quick scan of the National and World pages then do the quiz.

              After that I might go the Herald for a quick sqiz at anything else of interest or I might wait and go there later in the day. They both have their virtues and their deficiencies. Stuff’s often light on details. The Herald’s a bit busy.

            • kittycatkin

               /  2nd March 2016

              After my husband died, I cancelled the papers-too expensive, too much paper to haul out every week in the green bin. I sort of miss them, but the so-called Waikato edition of the Herald wasn’t really one. I don’t know why it was called that. I miss the fashion mags on Wednesday :-/

        • Oliver

           /  2nd March 2016

          NZH has move fluff by far, but then it has more opinion pieces. What puts me off is their over use of sensational headlines, and then have fluff and trivia as their lead stories. I feel like I have to wade through the crap to get to anything worth reading. Stuff’s website has less fluff and it seems easier to find articles worth reading.

          Reply
  2. Brown

     /  2nd March 2016

    People look at stuff like Stuff because its free and the adds are not intrusive (yet). If the print media part goes tits up that won’t last and then people won’t look. The best bit is that not looking at Stuff won’t suddenly make you ignorant.

    Reply
  3. kiwi guy

     /  2nd March 2016

    NZ Herald has been bragging about its massive rise in readership:

    “Herald readership, digital audiences soar

    The Herald on Sunday is now New Zealand’s best-read, number one Sunday newspaper, as it and the daily New Zealand Herald buck global trends in recording newspaper readership growth.

    The NZ Herald, under editor Murray Kirkness, has grown 1.5% on the previous quarter, to 404,000 readers and the Herald on Sunday, under editor Miriyana Alexander, by 1.3% to 303,000 readers, according to new Nielsen results released today.”

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11595365

    Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  2nd March 2016

    Gotta love Cameron taking credit for the decline of newspaper readership though. The Donkeyman of the Newspaper Apocalypse.

    Reply
  5. Granny Knows best

     /  2nd March 2016

    I read about the international news on the BBC website and then hear and see it in New Zealand media the next day. The local news rarely has in depth coverage and seems to be designed not discuss important issues in depth. I have yet to read a decent report on the TPP.

    Reply
  6. Pythagoras

     /  2nd March 2016

    Good to see that Stuff is taking journalism and original NZ content seriously.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/77374359/fairfax-media-hires-paula-penfold-eugene-bingham-toby-longbottom

    Reply
    • Pythagoras

       /  2nd March 2016

      I meant Fairfax, which includes Stuff.

      Reply
    • Oliver

       /  2nd March 2016

      I thought the 3D show was crap, just a bunch of sensationalism. I actually meet Paula and Eugene, my first impressions were that they didn’t care about the details they just want to put the story out there. There claim to “fame” was the Pora case. How ever years earlier Brian Bruce produced an investigative documentary proofing that Pora was wrongfully convicted, so I can’t see why 3D take credit for that.

      Reply
      • Iceberg

         /  2nd March 2016

        Let’s add irrelevant name dropping to your list eh Pinocchio?

        Reply
  7. Ergo Robertina

     /  2nd March 2016

    ”I’m part of the ODT decline, I dropped my long time subscription last year.”

    And yet you link to free content on the ‘tumbleweed’ ODT all the same.
    Seems rather hypocritical of bloggers to use free content from newspapers in order to build an audience, and then be super sanguine about contributing to their decline.
    Not your problem that there’s no functioning business model, I know, but it sure does make you seem like a hypocrite.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  2nd March 2016

      Both the Herald and Stuff shoot themselves in the foot with their horse-and-cart era comment and moderation systems. When they strangle debate they can’t complain if the debate goes elsewhere.

      Reply
      • Ergo Robertina

         /  2nd March 2016

        Yes, I enjoy the free-flowing debate on blogs too.
        I was just pointing out that bragging about dropping one lousy subscription while using the free content (not just from the Oddity but other sources of course) to help stimulate that debate seems a bit mean.
        As an aside, apart from on their Facebook pages, news organisations pre-moderate (and I read recently a couple of big overseas news sites have dropped comments altogether because of trolling) partly because it’s not like a blog where the community builds up a certain culture that helps to moderate the comments (and even then there are plenty of problems).

        Reply
        • I wasn’t bragging, you’ve got that wrong.

          If I have a choice I use the ODT as a source – and always only part quote and link – to give them more coverage in return for picking up some of their content. In a small way I help increase their audience so they get at least as much back.

          Reply
          • Ergo Robertina

             /  2nd March 2016

            Bragging wasn’t a good word to use.

            Re linking the source, the industry problem is not in finding an audience. The decline is in revenue not readers. Just look at the Guardian for one of the most stark examples at present.

            I’m surprised by the Alexa figures. I would have thought the likes of WO and the Standard would rank much higher.

            Reply
            • WO and The Standard are really small niche media that most people have never heard of. That’s still a reality. Most discussion is done in Facebook.

    • “And yet you link to free content on the ‘tumbleweed’ ODT all the same.”

      It may have sounded unfair referring to the ODT as “tumbleweed” but that was a dig at the Whale Oil team who keep saying media from Dunedin is tumbleweed.

      “be super sanguine about contributing to their decline”

      Not at all. It was quite a thing for me to drop my subscription, I’ve been reading the ODT for around fifty tears and it was quite a weird feeling cutting that.

      I don’t get your ‘hypocrite’ point.

      Reply

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