NZ’s ‘women of achievement’

The Herald reports on NZ’s 50 ‘women of achievement’.

Fifty Kiwi women have been recognised for their accomplishments in time for International Women’s Day today.

Zonta’s New Zealand chapter has chosen 50 “women of achievement” for their work in fields which deal with some of the most serious issues facing women today.

I’ll find the list of 50 when i get a chance. The Herald details the top ten:

Helen Clark, New York: The former Prime Minister is being honoured for her ongoing work promoting gender equality and women’s political, economic and social participation.

Louise Nicholas, Rotorua: Louise Nicholas has taken a lead in the change of attitudes towards victims of sexual abuse, working with the New Zealand Police on how to deal with victims of rape. She is also a leading advocate in raising the awareness of sexual abuse and the need for education and empowerment of women and young girls.

Lesley Elliott, Dunedin: Lesley Elliott is the founder and current chair of the Sophie Elliott Foundation, the mission of which is to cause a profound shift in New Zealanders’ attitudes towards relationship violence. The foundation’s Loves-Me-Not programme, aimed at Year 12 students, is a valuable resource in teaching young people how to recognise abusive behaviour.

Deborah Bush, Christchurch: Deborah Bush is the co-founder of Endometriosis New Zealand. ENZ has initiated specialised programmes, fostered research, and lobbied for better outcomes for girls and women with endometriosis in New Zealand.

Dame Silvia Cartwright, Auckland: Former Governor General Dame Silvia has served on the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women and played a major role in drafting protocol about how to reduce instances of gender discrimination.

Steve Chadwick, Rotorua: Rotorua Mayor Steve Chadwick established the first Family Planning Clinic in Rotorua and helped establish the city’s first Women’s Refuge and Teen Parent School. She had also been an advocate for sexual and maternal health.

Vi Cottrell, Kaiapoi: The co-founder of Trade Aid, Vi Cottrell has been committed to the social enterprise for over 40 years. Most craft producers are women and Fair Trade makes a huge impact on their and their families’ lives.

Dame Miriam Dell, South Wairapapa: Dame Miriam has been and continues to be at the forefront of women’s issues in New Zealand and internationally for over 30 years, promoting women’s advancement and equal rights in society.

Vanisa Dhiru, Wellington: Serving a number of not-for-profit boards since university, Vanisa Dhiru is involved with organisations in the women’s, ethnic and youth sectors. She is currently the vice-president of the National Council of Women of New Zealand.

Dame Margaret Sparrow, Wellington: Dame Margaret is a sexual health pioneer and a long-term advocate for women’s rights to abortion and contraception.

NOTE: This post is for recognising the achievements of new Zealand women.

Attacks on individual women or women in general will not be tolerated here.

Leave a comment

37 Comments

  1. Oliver

     /  8th March 2016

    So nothing really note worthy. Woman need to contribute more.

    Reply
  2. Brown

     /  8th March 2016

    Although one must give these credit for doing well what they do it looks like a smattering of troughers, do gooders, activists and pro abortionists working in their chosen pet projects. It reminds me of that old Steely Dan line, “The things you think are precious I don’t understand”. If you don’t like that quote I have others. I look forward to the next list.

    Reply
    • Oliver

       /  8th March 2016

      I think woman would achieve more at home looking after children and taking are of the household. When I look at the list above I see bunch of woman neglecting to do the womanly duties. It’s sad really, kids are neglected and society pays the price.

      Reply
      • the sarcasm is strong with this one…

        Reply
      • Oliver

         /  8th March 2016

        No I’m serious I read a report saying that woman who neglect thier role of mother to pursue a career have children that grow up with psychological problems due to neglect. This has a huge impact on society.

        Reply
        • Oliver

           /  8th March 2016

          I can understand why woman work. It’s because many families can’t survive on a single income. So maybe it’s the government’s faultn

          Reply
      • Dougal

         /  8th March 2016

        “Womany Duties” Like laundry, dishes, dusting type of duties? Good god man did you really say that out loud?

        Reply
        • Oliver

           /  8th March 2016

          I’m mean nurture and care for their families. The way nature intended it. I’m on their side, it’s not their fault they have to work.

          Reply
        • Pickled Possum

           /  8th March 2016

          @ Dougal .. yes he says thing aloud alot. but on the other hand we have
          Mainly manly duties … the wild thing on demand yes I say on demand!
          taking out the rubbish on the first ask
          Getting the highest paid job to
          provide for the life which all woman should be accustomed to
          safety and faithfulness galore.
          Opps I can hear the Tui calling.

          Reply
    • Bangle Boy

       /  8th March 2016

      @Oliver, men seem to be unable to earn an adiquite wage to provide for their family any more, therefore women are having to take up the slack and go out to work as well

      Reply
      • Oliver

         /  8th March 2016

        I understand that. It’s because our country Has been poorly run over the last few years. But can you appreciate the impact this has on the children, and in turn the community.

        Reply
        • Bangle Boy

           /  8th March 2016

          it would seem that you are blaming children’s psychological problems due to neglect on working women because the menfolk cannot provide for the family, interesting

          Reply
        • Oliver

           /  8th March 2016

          No I blaming it on the government. Men don’t get to decide how much money they make. Or how much the government takes away from them.

          Reply
    • @ Bangle Boy – While I think Oliver is mainly just trying to ‘engage an opponent’, the central issue you both raise is significant IMHO. We, the nebulous, collective “we”, have created a “market society” (as opposed to a market economy) whereby women (and perhaps men too?) do not have sufficient choices about whether to be full-time child rearers, or let’s just call them “parents”?

      We previously did have this choice ‘financially’ except the assignment of ‘roles’ was largely dictated by pre-feminist gender stereotypes and social mores [Happy to be corrected on this?] which women found restrictive, if not oppressive.

      Morgan/Guthrie again, “The economy comprises a raft of unpaid occupations – parenting, care of the elderly, volunteer organisations … and so on. The amount of time that anyone can spend on these is largely limited by their access to independent means – their own income or wealth or that of an earning spouse. For a society that produces far more than is required to meet basic needs such a restriction on choice seems backward.” – ‘The Big Kahuna’ pgs 11-12.

      It’s almost like, if it isn’t “productive”, if it isn’t producing money, we just don’t count it nowadays. As Dennis Potter said, “People have just become ‘units of production and consumption'”. Peerhaps economics should somehow recognise “contribution in kind” like an application for Community Board funding does?

      Reply
  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  8th March 2016

    Ignore Oliver. Dr Margaret Sparrow has been a steady, unselfish and sensible force for good over many years.

    Reply
    • Oliver

       /  8th March 2016

      Wilky you’re like a bad itch that won’t go away. When will you ever learn.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  8th March 2016

        I think you should present a daily apology for being Oliver, Oliver. Just post it in the Open Forum every morning.

        Reply
        • Oliver

           /  8th March 2016

          Why because I exercise my freedom of speech. I raise valid arguments backed by scientific research. If you disagree with it, then that’s fine, you have my permission to disagree. But stop it with the childish slander.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  8th March 2016

            Because you approach each issue with an impartially open mouth disconnected from reality issuing random offence. You may as well apologise in advance as I suggest.

            Reply
          • I agree Alan, also Oliver can be guaranteed to blame te Government for all things that do not meet his wishes. I ignore his comments because the majority of New Zealanders elected the Government to lead our governance because they exercised their majority choice. People who blame the Government are whistling in the wind, because the money is not the Government’s, the people pay the taxes, and hire or fire the managers. Its called democracy!

            Reply
            • Oliver

               /  8th March 2016

              You’re right I should be blamming the idiots that voted for National.

    • Pete Kane

       /  8th March 2016

      Alan, re Dr Sparrow, I’m guessing that must have been a very heated discussion at meetings during your candidate days. As I recall. often vicious – from all sides.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  8th March 2016

        Not really, Pete. There were strong emotions sometimes but we generally managed to keep political discussions on a rational level. Behind the scenes was where the venting happened.

        Reply
  4. Pickled Possum

     /  8th March 2016

    “Are you reelin’ in the years
    Stowin’ away the time
    Are you gatherin’ up the tears
    Have you had enough of mine ”

    “Zonta International has a long and well-respected history of partnership in programmes with United Nations Agencies and maintains consultative status on women’s issues with the UN and Council of Europe.” 😦

    Some Great people in NZ people who stand by the underdog disabled sick.
    People who work day half the night for the abused scared grieving and the
    mentallyhomeless.
    A large percentage of the people who help with empathy and sympathy
    will be Woman.
    Grandmothers aunties sisters nieces grand daughters and daughters who have educated their family into this dog eat dog to have skills to dodge the many temptations and pitfalls. We celebrate their achievements.

    Reply
  5. Toby

     /  8th March 2016

    “NOTE: This post is for recognising the achievements of new Zealand women.

    Attacks on individual women or women in general will not be tolerated here.”

    Thanks Pete. Good to know you’re here to protect us all. Not sure how you balance that with your aim towards free speech, but you’ve just put criticism of women in general (or specific) on the taboo list.

    Reply
    • @ Toby … [self-edit comment re possible identity, agenda] … yeah, like child-hating m%f#@kers ain’t welcome at my daughter’s birthday party … you know …? It’s just one day? Just one topic thread where you might attempt to contain yourself?

      Talk about your Mum? Good woman? Mine was amazing.

      Reply
      • Toby

         /  8th March 2016

        You need to relax.

        So we can’t talk about Clare Curran then? Because, you know, woman.

        Pete says he’s got free speech here. But then says we can’t attack women. Why not? I can name a few that slept their way to the top for example. Or rode in on their husband’s coat tails. Genuine achievement? Is getting there the only criteria? Mona Dotcom anyone?

        As for identity and agenda, I’m not a man, so you can’t criticise me, specifically or generally. Pete says so. Well, not today then, anyway….

        Reply
        • Pantsdownbrown

           /  8th March 2016

          Toby: “Genuine achievement? Is getting there the only criteria? Mona Dotcom anyone?”

          Mona Dotcom deserves our respect & has earned every dollar that has come her way. She was very brave and saw things that no woman should ever see and may never fully recover from – Kim Dotcom nude.

          Reply
          • Okay, I’m through being nice – this is my daughter’s birthday party! … :-/
            Apologies to everyone in advance …. 😦 Big genuine SORRY
            Edit me PG …. I can’t do it myself …

            [Deleted. If you know it’s a problem why did you do it? It is clearly a problem. Even if the two of you might be able to handle it this would send a single to others that this sort of thing is acceptable herer. It isn’t. PG]

            Reply
          • That’s quite a “backhand” you’ve got there Pantsdown! 😦
            Well, I’ve achieved being edited. I suppose that’s something?
            It was a good song too, I reckon. :-/
            And, by the way, an excellent “Touche” reply! 😀

            Reply
            • Pantsdownbrown

               /  8th March 2016

              I saw your song before it was deleted – last time I defend Mona Dotcom! :;

            • PDB – My song wasn’t all that bad was it? Maybe you could ask PG to reinstate it? Nelly would love it I reckon? 🙂

              “Last time I defend Mona Dotcom!” is the reply I say a genuine and respectful “Touche!” to PDB. Notwithstanding it is like a second backhander. You’re quick on the draw though …

              If I was ‘O’ I’d be dead! But I am the ‘Gunslinger’ … 😀 Anyhow, look, back on topic.I wanted to look at the long list of 50 ‘Women of Achievement’ at the Herald but darned if I can find how to access it. Call me computer illiterate!

              I have met Steve Chadwick when she was Minister of Conservation, Women’s Affairs and Assoc Minister of Health in Helen Clarke’s Labour govt. Very nice lady and I’m rather pleased to say she owns a piece of my artwork. She tried to change shop trading hours (Easter trading) way back in 2006! Narrowly defeated by 64 – 57.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Chadwick

  6. Revel

     /  9th March 2016

    This really is a bunch of nonsense. It reeks of another cash for comment and column inches by the business end of the Herald pumping certain women of influence who influence there way into the paper with cash for puff pieces. Mai Chen anyone?

    Reply

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