Reflections on the life of Ranginui Walker

To anyone interested, Bryce Edwards has done a round up of coverage related to Ranginui Walker’s death.

Ranginui Walker was farewelled last week by thousands of mourners at Auckland’s Orakei Marae. He occupied many roles during his celebrated life, including academic, writer, educator and activist. Bryce Edwards rounds up some of the best reflections on the life of a remarkable man.

Political roundup: Death of a radical intellectual

 

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63 Comments

  1. kiwi guy

     /  8th March 2016

    From the linked article:

    – You can read his Listener column at the time, which opens “I have been here a thousand years. You arrived only yesterday” –

    Really? After a 1000 years Maoris still hadn’t even got around to inventing the wheel, let alone concepts like one man one vote.

    Then evil whitey came along and in no time at all we had a thriving Capitalist democracy.

    – Spoonley says Walker was influenced “by radical authors such as Freire, Illich and Gramsci.” Certainly Gramsci’s notion of the “organic intellectual”… –

    Yep, the usual goto Cultural Marxist propagandists for Leftists.

    Reply
  2. Timoti

     /  8th March 2016

    Paulo Reglus Neves Freire. The man who cost a generation of New Zealanders a decent education.

    Reply
  3. Pickled Possum

     /  8th March 2016

    New Zealand Maori Council co-chairperson Maanu Paul said Walker’s “ability to interpret the Maori and non-Maori worlds was his great skill” describing him as “the first race relations conciliator for New Zealand without having occupied the official title”

    Yes a most important skill to have … to be able to cut through all the BS and get to the heart of the matter. If you had a matter to get to …that is.

    “The National govt @Johnkeypm and @chrisfinlayson snub Dr Ranginui Walkers’ tangi no one sent to honour the former Waitangi Tribunal member”.

    Ranginui did not exist to be held up on high by men of a different kaupapa.

    Anne Salmond writer of Hui; said

    “The job of a scholar, like that of a journalist, is to find their way to the heart of the matter – past self-serving interests and misleading ”

    tautoko that Anne.

    Reply
    • kiwi guy

       /  8th March 2016

      Walker bought into Marxist nonsense, nothing intellectually great or scholarly about that.

      Reply
      • Marxist nonsense like thesis, antithesis and synthesis KG? Critical thinking. Long, long may it run! May it run like the wind forever and ever. May it never surrender!

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_thinking

        Reply
        • kiwi guy

           /  8th March 2016

          Thesis – Antithesis – Synthesis : yes, Dialectical Materialism has been a spectacular failure as a predictive model of anything.

          The fact that Leftist like Walker and yourself are still devoted to a failed philosophical concept reveals how politicized the Humanities have become, no longer where critical thought takes place, just the Leftist indoctrination of young minds – all on the tax payer tab of course.

          You may be confused and actually thinking of Critical Theory which is just Leftist academic babble for an ideological attack on Western Civilisation – a long the lines of “white Capitalist Christian straight guys are the oppressor class and obese muslim black lesbians are the oppressed class that needs to be liberated in a Marxist revolution” type polemic.

          Reply
    • @ Possum – I wish I hadn’t commented facetiously above. Probly start a sh%tstorm about nothing. Kia ora toku hoa. E pehea ana koe? 🙂 e kore e nga kupu tika enei : these are not the correct words. And they are not directed at you. They just leapt to mind so I’ll share them … (others are sharing virtual irrelevancies so why not me, eh?) … I thought of Ani Mika, “Giving up such control requires a leap of faith on the part of Päkehä.”

      “I been trying to get down
      To the Heart of the Matter
      But my will gets weak
      And my thoughts seem to scatter …
      But I think its about …
      Forgiveness … Forgiveness ….
      Even if, even if … you don’t love me anymore.”

      – Don Henley ‘Heart of the Matter’

      I abhor the “Stone Age Culture” position KG employs. How useful is this? (Perhaps we would all be better off without the wheel?)

      Any English person who has lived in Tyne-on-Tumbridge (or wherever, Lee-on-Solent) for 1000 years and been properly schooled in their families’ and the area’s his/herstory will know something about the place with every step they take, literally with every breath. Each metre of the land, each hillock, meadow or ancient tree will have a story and perhaps a song? Hence (it seems to me), after 40,000 years (or more) you might follow the Song Lines as much as the contours of the land itself? This English person, presented with a new immigrant, might say, “You do not know this place like I do”. This, it seems to me, would be a self-evident truth.

      “there is nowhere else in the world that one can be Päkehä. Whether the term remains forever linked to the shameful role of oppressor or whether it can become a positive source of identity and pride is up to Päkehä themselves. All that is required from them is a leap of faith” Ani Mikaere, ‘Pakeha Indigeneity’

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  8th March 2016

        Oh, what claptrap, PZ. The arrogance of others speaking for me is beyond contempt and worthy only of ridicule.

        I salute all my marvellous inheritance, genetic, familial, cultural and intellectual from whatever sources they come. I pity those who feel the need to elevate some above others and by doing so deprive themselves of great riches.

        I even more deeply pity those who create for themselves a divide between races and cultures and by so doing impoverish themselves in many ways. That includes those who regard immigrants to their place as something less than themselves as well as those who regard the locals in the same way.

        To smear pakeha with “the shameful role of the oppressor” is simply despicable. Apologise.

        Reply
        • GFY Alan, for what shall I apologise? Yours is a triumph of Transumption. An absolute pinnacle of the form to be admired by your brethren from all their entrenched positions. I’ll need a reference to “others speaking for me”, sorry, where have I done this? To some extent this is what this sharing of ideas is about, surely? One can’t qualify every sentence or word with IMHO. And for Heaven’s sake, don’t talk to me about arrogance.

          I quoted a Maori commentator, Law lecturer Ani Mikaere. I do not say immigrants are “less than” locals. I say they are different perhaps, by implication? What I actually say is a local can rightly claim to know the place more deeply. I absolutely will not apologise for putting that idea “out there”. Feel free to disagree …

          I have a marvellous heritage too Alan, in all the same areas as you, and I too am proud of mine. I happen to think we are in the divisive position right now regards race relations, but on the cusp of new processes of understanding and reconciliation.

          There is great resistance to this, IMHO. A tendency in our society to gloss over it and think all is well. This tendency is a Pakeha tendency IMHO. I am prepared, (in my superior critical thinking capacity 🙂 ) to consider a viewpoint like Ani Mikaere’s, “This [‘going forward’] will involve sorting out a process of negotiation which is driven by the principles underpinning tikanga, a process which Päkehä do not control.”

          Personal opinions, thoughts, references to others opinions ….

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  8th March 2016

            Apologise for that last paragraph, PZ.

            Reply
            • WHAT!? Have you lost the plot Alan? I can’t apologize for words written by Ani Mikaere, even if I wanted to? You want me to apologize for posting her words? Don’t answer that because I’m not going to.

              “Dude, talk to the Kiwi Guy” !!!

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  8th March 2016

              You cited them approvingly. Now disown them. Don’t prevaricate.

            • WTF Alan!? Cuppa tea time? Blood sugar low?

              Now let me see, is her quote accompanied by any words of approval? No, not in that paragraph, therefore NOT!!! Maybe you should apologize for telling me what my intentions are? How dare you?

              Hmmmm … “Now disown them” … Let me see …. Ummmmmmm …. NOPE!!!

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  8th March 2016

              So you don’t approve it but you don’t disown it. Pathetic grovelling, PZ. Well, I reject and condemn it and its fellow travelers.

            • Alan, its some leavening in the multigrain loaf. Think you’re going to somehow force me into relinquishing my own open-mindedness? Into taking an either/or position? A Maori OR Pakeha stance? BRRRR! Wrong!!!

              I want both!? I want both for me and the nation.

              Your outright rejection of another highly intelligent person’s opinion, I suspect without even properly considering it, reflects upon you IMHO and does nothing for me whatsoever, sorry …. Each to their own ….

        • Pickled Possum

           /  8th March 2016

          @ Alan

          Ani was not smearing any body she was saying …

          “there is nowhere else in the world that one can be Päkehä. Whether the term remains forever linked to the shameful role of oppressor or whether it can become a positive source of identity and pride is up to Päkehä themselves.”

          She doesn’t say Far Cough and Dye Pakeha she is saying imho redefine the word that brings so much negativity to the original meaning that word was given. 🙂

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  8th March 2016

            I don’t believe you, Possum. Her words speak for themselves and they do not say what you claim.

            Reply
            • Pickled Possum

               /  8th March 2016

              @ Alan
              Another statement as to why Ani kaupapa will take a long to time. Don’t you want to forge forward and put all the negativity behind you?
              To really understand what Ani is saying you would have to read her whole paper , but would you value that as a *waste of time*?
              imho you undervalue your own mind when you disregard the context as well as the meaning and just go for the ‘provocative’ word or words.
              But an apology is not in order for any thing that is Ani written.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  8th March 2016

              PZ is responsible for the context or lack of it. Or irresponsible.

            • The context being, “Reflections on the life of Ranganui Walker” … This, “if you’re not with us your against us” is the irresponsible thing IMHO.

            • Edit, “If you’re not with us you’re against us” …

            • Pickled Possum

               /  8th March 2016

              @ Alan
              it was a quote taken out of her paper where she quoted *Mike Grimshaw ..

              Click to access iwi-am04.pdf


              read it in context if you have time on this hot day
              and I would appreciate your thoughts.
              Grimshaw, M “What Lies Beneath”, Listener 4 September 2004, 40, at 41

            • Please don’t play “Perfect Referencer” Alan? Not worth it. You don’t have a good record to stand on. Thanks Possum. I have also now referenced the site where I found the article below … Can I be forgiven my initial oversight?

            • Pickled Possum

               /  8th March 2016

              @Parti
              of course … oversight foresight nearsight greatsight 🙂
              I think this site only has a 2 link max till you are sent to spam?? so linking every word quote is not gonna get
              some far.
              When I disagree/agree factuality on a particular comment with quote I look it up to make my own mind up. Quotes
              have to be expanded for full meaning imho.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  8th March 2016

              I’m travelling, Possum. Will look later.

      • Zedd

         /  8th March 2016

        A lot to take in PZ.. but “Ka Pai e Hoa”

        I was surprised to read your knowledge of the ‘Song-lines’.. (40,000 yrs on their minds) 🙂

        Reply
        • Sideline: There is a range of opinion as to how long Aboriginal people have actually occupied Australia Zedd. One ‘school’ considers their timeline runs “at least 60,000 years” – http://austhrutime.com/aboriginal_australia.htm – and they are responsible for transforming the ecology of the entire continent! Pretty amazing achievement?

          Reply
          • Zedd

             /  8th March 2016

            @PZ

            I worked in Redfern for a while.. there is a painting on the wall near the Railway Stn.
            “40,000 years is a long time.. BUT 40,000 years are still on my mind” (or something like that) :/
            I think its generally agreed that at least that long. “Knowledge IS power” 🙂

            Reply
      • Pickled Possum

         /  8th March 2016

        @Parti
        tautoko your korero toku hoa
        facetious defined as amusing … as it was. 🙂
        sh%tstorm ah 🙂 just put up your umbrella of truth and understanding of things Maori.

        Ani speaks the truth in all ways she gives the power to English settlers mokopuna the right to go back to the original meaning of the word pakeha=foreigner, stranger and that wasn’t including the …. ‘stranger danger’ jingle.
        To use the word Pakeha as a Good word and the spirit it was given.
        The Leap of faith she talks of is slow to come but it will. I have faith.

        I am me, still enjoying the music and life, enjoying reading the many words of great understanding written in this site. DON’T laff hehe
        Learning to answer to the take instead of the man/woman … learning.
        Ranganui passing has left his words, which more young and old people will read and will have more meaning to their own kaupapa.
        Hahahah Stone age culture … yea didn’t they invent the wheel, Yep.

        Reply
        • The Ani Mikaere article can be found amongst the ‘Resources: Aotearoa’ on Matike Mai Aotearoa website here – http://www.converge.org.nz/pma/iwi.htm – scroll down to –

          ‘Are we all New Zealanders now? A Maori response to the Pakeha quest for indigeneity’, Ani Mikaere, Bruce Jesson Memorial Lecture 2004

          The site is the Iwi Constitution Consideration Group website and contains their report document plus a whole bunch of stories and background resources. I found it very useful and interesting because, “I’ve been trying to get down, to the heart of the matter” to find out where I stand : te wahi e tu ahau

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  8th March 2016

            Ok, I’ve read as much as I want to and enough to see that PZ is wrong to say Mikaere was quoting Grimshaw. The words complained of were hers, not his which were entirely sensible.

            The article is a tedious polemic unworthy of Jesson who was actually a school contemporary of mine and a clear thinker. I would not dream of generalising about Maori feelings and beliefs and regard with contempt Mikaere’s claim to do the same about mine. I call b.s. to almost all of it.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  8th March 2016

              Sorry, it was Possum who said it was Grimshaw, not PZ.

            • @ Alan – Under the circumstances outlined by you above, I am wondering how you possibly got past the Bruce Jesson quote which begins the whole document? Directly under the heading, vis –

              “Racial conflict was one of the formative experiences of New Zealand society. Pakeha New Zealanders are the products of an invading culture. As individuals we can be magnanimous or guilt-stricken, according to our inclination. But as a society we have this amazing capacity for self-deception. For more than a century we smugly believed that this country was a model of racial harmony, that we were one people. Maori radicalism has put an end to that particular delusion, and we are now in the process of putting down new layers of hypocrisy.”

              Anyway, I’m happy to talk about it without you …

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  8th March 2016

              But of course you can’t, as I do call b.s. when I see it.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  8th March 2016

              As for Mikaere, she found a knob Jesson wrote and hung her baggage on it.

            • Pickled Possum

               /  8th March 2016

              @Alan Yes The first part of the quote was Mike Grimshaw

              “I am a Pakeha because I live in a Maori country.”

              I have spoken to both Ani and Mike some years back and I came away with the perception of what I first said.
              That Pakeha have the power now to change that word Pakeha into the true meaning foreigner – stranger. The true meaning of the word when Maori first set eyes on the English sailors “Pakeha Pakeha” then swan out to greet them feed them and everything them.
              How could that word, which is what I original was commenting on cause so much grief. Any way we have different opinions and values and I agree with you on more things often than not…
              so have a great rest of the hottest day … since yesterday. 🙂

            • Robby

               /  8th March 2016

              Let us examine the word ‘Pakeha’, just for fun
              In Maori, Pa means village, and Keha means flea. So a literal translation would be ‘Village Flea’, to someone who doesn’t understand the many ‘nuances’ of Te Reo.
              Another ‘urban myth’, is that Maori heard British whalers (speaking as sailors do), regularly saying “Pharkeya” to each other, and adopted this as a name for them.
              A third option (which IMHO is the most likely), is that it is a shortened version of Pakepakeha, which means ‘imaginary beings resembling men’.
              http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/1966/maori-pakeha-pakeha-maori/page-2

            • I’ve written about

              I’ve posted about The soft and loud of “Pākehā”

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  8th March 2016

              Yes, Possum, the first sentence in PZ’s quote marks was Grimshaw, but the sentence I take exception to was entirely Mikaere’s.

              I have no issue with Grimshaw’s sentence she quoted (which is not the one you quote) and from vague recollections of reading his original Listener article I believe I thought that a good contribution at the time.

              Pakeha is a perfectly neutral and objective word until individuals like Mikaere misuse it and abuse it. I will not allow that.

              I respect other cultures but in doing so I do not disrespect my own.

      • Conspiratoor

         /  8th March 2016

        @parti boy. I’ve just spent the day toiling in the mine so that my hard earned dollar might be distributed amongst the less fortunate idle who have no choice than sit around bashing their keyboards and being offended by excited electrons. If that’s oppressive I’m a liberal. I still love you though

        Reply
  4. Timoti

     /  8th March 2016

    I see the Ghetto Whites are out in force today.

    Reply
    • Zedd

       /  8th March 2016

      ‘Ghetto Whites’
      Well ‘Gidday’ to U2 😀

      Reply
    • No Timoti, there’s a bunch of people commenting here … and you dumping on us.
      Stand tall bro. Be proud.

      Reply
    • Pickled Possum

       /  8th March 2016

      @ Timoti
      Yours words are one of reasons this kaupapa that Ani speaks of will take a lot longer than needed.
      Seemingly little pithy lines are no match for truth understanding and knowledge.
      Or commonly known as Facts and Logic.

      Reply
    • Timoti

       /  8th March 2016

      Yep, One nerve hit….one truth revealed…….Ghetto White.

      Ka Pai e Hoa” LoL.
      tautoko that Anne. LoL.
      E pehea ana koe LoL.

      Here’s one…don’t bring your raru raru to Petes whare. That’s not what the Kawa of this blog or Pete’s personal kaupapa is about… HAAAAAAA HOHOHO…and one snigger.

      Reply
      • @ Timoti – Okay, it must be Astrological? It’s a bad day for Rightie brain function generally across the board. I can’t wait to hear Pete’s comment on your post Timoti –

        “don’t bring your raru raru to Petes whare. That’s not what the Kawa of this blog or Pete’s personal kaupapa is about …HAAAAAAA HOHOHO…and one snigger.”

        Ummm, Timoti … Pete posted the b%@**y TOPIC!

        Reply
        • Pickled Possum

           /  8th March 2016

          Do not enter into dialogue with this person Parti he will just try to take you down to the deep dark pits of hate that he displays here. I must not interact with the sorry one again.
          Here Parti some up lifting and encouragement for you to go on as you are.

          Reply
          • Ae and Aye Possum. Ae. Mohio. Tena koe toku hoa. Atu, hoa manaakitia.

            The Hollies are playing on the radio,
            “And the load, doesn’t weigh me down, at all”
            How I wish that was true …

            Reply
          • kiwi guy

             /  8th March 2016

            ” deep dark pits of hate”

            Yeah you Leftist are showing plenty of that what with assaults on politcians and arson attacks against their offices.

            And we know where your Left Marxist ideology with its hatred of whites/men/Capitalism ends up:

            Meanwhile look at those evil Capitalist pigs with their racism and sexism and fat shaming culture!:

            Reply
            • Pickled Possum

               /  8th March 2016

              I don’t know if I’m a lefty … KG how can you tell?

              But I have never done “assaults on politcians and arson attacks against their offices.” .. or even had an inkling to even think about it.
              And I love rich white men KG with a passion. So I don’t fit in to your ideal of a Left Marxist ideology because I don’t always favour the ‘underdog’

              The pictures you post of the humiliated the ridiculed tortured mutilated smashed up humans to make your point even more obscure are hurtful.

              Turning a picture of youthful surfers enjoying the privilege they inherited into something so far from the reality of it, is just not right.
              I was replying to your friend but if you want some of the pits then help yourself.

      • Timoti

         /  8th March 2016

        Damn..I should have given the patients Novocaine, they are dribbling.

        Reply
        • Timoti

           /  8th March 2016

          Bad news, Timoti, old hoa. The hapu have brownlisted you. You are a Toa without a cause. Your crime is being a kupapa. Even menial mahi is denied you. Damn the colonisers. They have brought evil. Give me a song, Tane, so I may lament my troubles away.

          Tino pai, John Kay and da boys.

          Reply
          • Robby

             /  8th March 2016

            “Ghetto whites”??? That’s not very nice Timmy….
            I knew the song above sounded familiar, and have finally figured out why, skip to 4:44 below….
            We are all just ‘Riders on the storm’ Timmy, and your divisive language is not helpful to any of us.

            Reply
            • Robby

               /  8th March 2016

            • Pickled Possum

               /  8th March 2016

              Yaaa Robby the sound of reason ..and Great Music.
              Some Sly and the family Stone … Dance to the music

            • Robby

               /  8th March 2016

              Nice PP, I prefer this one tho’…..

              Better take our bad taste in music over to open forum, before someone has a moan about it 😉

            • Timoti

               /  8th March 2016

              Dear me, Robby. I was just calling out patronising smary Ghetto whites( or one ).

              Ka Pai e hoa. I have no raru raru with you unless you want me to. I will give you credit though for not writing Pigeon Hori.

            • Robby

               /  8th March 2016

              Pigeon Hori? You mean like “Ka mate koe i te kai hikareti”, which was the standard MOH warning on cigarette packets, up until pretty recently? “If you eat cigarettes, you will die” LOL

            • Timoti

               /  8th March 2016

              Context, Rob.

              “Ka mate koe i te kai hikareti”

              If you eat cigarettes, you will die” LOL???

              Don’t skewer the meaning, Rob.

            • Robby

               /  8th March 2016

              Please tell me what is incorrect about that translation. A friend who is a fluent speaker related that translation to me, and thought it was quite funny.
              Speaking of accurate translations, shouldn’t it be “Te Reo Kereru”???

            • Timoti

               /  8th March 2016

              Depends on the tribal dialect in some circumstances.

              Your friend is right. That could be a literal translation.

              However, it revolves around the word consume. You could consume( ingest) cigarettes. You could also consume the smoke( via inhaling). Whether that is the nearest or best translation I do not know. I am not a fluent Maori speaker.

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