Ten big ideas

Labour’s Future of Work – Ten Big Ideas:

  1. Digital equality so access to technology is assured.
    Building digital equality – through ensuring Kiwis can access technology regardless of where they live or how wealthy they are.
  2. Tech in business to accelerate technology use in the economy.
    Accelerating technology in business – through developing new models of capital raising and investing in research and development.
  3. Business clusters to maximise competitive advantages.
    Developing Business Clusters – by creating regional partnerships of business, councils, research organisations and iwi to get the best out of local and emerging industries.
  4. Building wealth by supporting new business models.
    Building wealth from the ground up – by encouraging new models of business, including entrepreneurship and cooperatives to create a more sustainable economy.
  5. A just transition to support workers in a shifting job market.
    Building wealth from the ground up – by encouraging new models of business, including entrepreneurship and cooperatives to create a more sustainable economy.
  6. Income security so our tax and welfare systems deliver.
    Ensuring greater income security – through investigation of new models of income security for New Zealand, including considering a limited trial of a universal basic income-type system in a town or region.
  7. Reform the transition between education, training and work.
    Ensuring greater income security – through investigation of new models of income security for New Zealand, including considering a limited trial of a universal basic income-type system in a town or region.
  8. Working futures: 3 years free post-secondary education.
    Labour’s Working Futures Plan – in which all New Zealanders receive three free years of post-school education, phased in from 2019.
  9. Maori partnerships to help develop the Maori economy.
    Partnering with Maori in a post-Treaty settlement era – through the Government facilitating strategic partnerships between iwi, business, and third parties to develop the Maori economy.
  10. Pasifika partnerships to support Pasifika in entrepreneurship, work and training.
    Establishing a Pasifika working futures plan – by working with the community to focus on the transition between education and work and identifying and eliminating the barriers to entrepreneurship.

Read the full Ten Big Ideas discussion document here.

Leave a comment

28 Comments

  1. I’m just posting these ideas for discussion. They seem quite wordy but vague.

    Reply
    • Mefrostate

       /  23rd March 2016

      Yeah, lots of impressive-sounding words, but very little substance. Some are so vague that it would be easy to argue that National have already made significant progress on them. For example for number 1, the investment in UFB and RBI, with a focus on schools, has surely remarkably improved “digital equality”.

      Is this the end or the start of the ‘Future of Work’ commission? Because it would be good to hear some more concrete policies.

      Reply
      • the Ten Big Ideas have a link to a discussion document so like UBI it sounds like it has a long way to go.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  23rd March 2016

          What original ideas, I bet that they’ve never been thought of before.

          Reply
    • I think this is the beginning of ‘Future of Work’ commission, or at least the beginning of it ‘going public’? Please avoid setting a trap for Labour whatever they do. So like with UBI the discussion became too ‘concrete’ too soon and now this is not concrete enough to begin with. IMHO this speaks of your own biases more than anything else.

      I have been involved in any number of visioning, mission setting, policy formation and brainstorming exercises which almost inevitably start out using vague and often positive or even ‘utopian’ language. Nothing new, nothing wrong. It’s a way of trying to draw out truly original, new and unique ideas, amongst other things. Set the parameters very wide.

      If we engage with it “as it is” the ideas might come out. If we criticize it for “being what it is” there’s no chance …

      I think 5. Work Transition & 6. Income Security will become increasingly important in the future, especially for the Precariat, which, having read Guy Standing today, I agree is the new “mass movement”, dead-set on abolishing itself. What was so terrible about “job security”?

      I believe both “flow” in and out of paid work and the positive reframing of “work” inherent in “income security”, whatever form it takes, will be very good for society.

      “The progressives of the era have always reinvented the future. They are doing it now.”

      http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/apr/21/cheer-up-left-social-democracy-progressive-precariat

      P.G. The description under the heading 5. “Transition” is the same as that under 4. above and I think may be incorrect? Don’t have time to look it up right now.

      Reply
  2. Kitty Catkin

     /  23rd March 2016

    😀 😀 😀

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  23rd March 2016

      Sorry, that was for my comment, not yours 😦

      Reply
      • Aha!!! Busted! Emoting-up your own comments! 😉 Next you’ll be upticking yourself! 😀

        P.S. I’m heartbroken your emo’s are not for my carefully considered comment about Guy Standing, who I prophesy you will never even read about much less actually read his own writings. 🙂

        Reply
        • Pantsdownbrown

           /  23rd March 2016

          I thought 3 emoticons laughing at the absurdity of PZ’s post was quite appropriate! Worth an uptick I reckon…….

          Reply
  3. Kitty Catkin

     /  23rd March 2016

    I wouldn’t mind betting that a few people in Labour are cursing the UBI, as Labour can’t easily back down from what is fairly obviously a non-starter without looking silly and vacillating-unless they said simply that when they went into it, it seemed as if it was, in fact, unfeasible, and didn’t try to woffle their way out of it.

    Reply
    • @ KCK – 😀 Speaks volumes about the ability of our (herd instinct) Party Political polarised society to have a simple, open-ended, open-minded, growth oriented discussion about any-f%#king-thing. :-/ I rack up another huge bunch of points in my argument for fundamental reform of democracy. It will probably take one, two or three generations but god I’d love to leave the future a world in which such discussions could simply “take place”! 🙂

      The sad truth of the matter, it seems to me, is that in the present f*&ked-up circumstances Labour should do this all “in house”?

      So despite the implication of “fail” I give them enormous respect for trying it out in public, I really do, and, I might add, I AM NOT A LABOUR SUPPORTER. 😎

      Reply
      • The word “ability” above is transposable with “inability”. Regardless of which is used the meaning is, “this is something we are evidently not capable of doing” …

        Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  23rd March 2016

      These things are just people-pleasers. It’s hard to disagree with them, and hard to find anything definite in most of them.

      Reply
      • They are inviting the people to contribute ideas about substance within the headings , or create the “anything definite” in them.

        Reply
  4. David

     /  23rd March 2016

    I listened to Katheryn Ryan interview that Guy Standing fella from England who is advising them, complete tosser was my reaction after getting up off the floor from laughing so hard. Thought using Jane Kelsey to advise on trade policy was bonkers..she has nothing on this closeted academic loon.

    Reply
    • @ David – Depends what kind of society you want to live in I guess?

      So there’s no ‘gross’ inequality? No ‘real’ poverty? No problems with housing, education, health, labour markets and all the rest? No ‘actual’ welfare issues? (I wonder why we’re discussing UBI at all?) :-/

      Nothing the free market won’t fix eh?

      Reply
      • David

         /  23rd March 2016

        We don’t have a free market, there is no gross inequality and it appears there are some huge wins being made in welfare which we have one of the most generous on earth…I have never seen a malnourished NZer.
        All the problems you list have minor issues and always have been and always will. I was in San Fran for the America,s Cup tripping over homeless veterans begging next to 100 million dollar yachts so I think it’s utter bollocks that we compare ourselves to other countries.
        NZ is a fantastic society, the best on earth and I have been poor and rich here.

        Reply
  5. Pantsdownbrown

     /  23rd March 2016

    Labour should have named it;

    TEN BIG GENERALISATIONS

    Reply
    • Over and over and over again you prove me right PDB! 🙂 I love it! Thank you. 😀

      How, I wonder, do you think the general ever becomes the particular? Do you think discussion might ever play a role in that? 😉

      Things must be all right just the way they are?
      If not, the free market will fix everything, eh? :-/

      Reply
      • Pantsdownbrown

         /  23rd March 2016

        Nothings ever perfect PartisanZ, especially within an economy that is changing on a daily basis – but best Labour keep their thoughts to themselves until they have something with some meat on it for us to chew on don’t you think?

        The devil is always in the detail.

        Reply
        • David

           /  23rd March 2016

          Exactly. They have had 7 years and all they have is 10 half baked ideas stolen from any university economics course anywhere, hell I remember a few of these from a Massey paper 20 years ago.

          Reply
  6. Zedd

     /  23rd March 2016

    Good to hear that Labour are debating some policy ideas.. rather than just ‘poll-watching’ (ho hum) as I hear ‘Team Key’ spend much of their hours ?? :/

    “GO.. you good things.” 😀

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  23rd March 2016

      I don’t believe that National have so little to do that they spend their time doing that-what would be the point ? Polls aren’t continuous like the stock exchange where things change all the time. An MP’s life is very hard work, and a Minister’s more so. A 17 hour day is not unheard of, a friend who was a Minister used to do those hours all the time. Another Minister friend said firmly that he wanted to be free after 4.30 on what was laughingly called his holidays, so did not want to have any engagements after then. He had to have a driver-he was on the phone almost non-stop. MPs don’t spend the day sitting around watching polls.

      Reply
      • jamie

         /  23rd March 2016

        Polls most certainly are continuous Kitty. Just not the ones we get to hear about.

        Reply
  7. Kevin

     /  23rd March 2016

    Ten big ways Labour will try and interfere with the economy and make thing worse.

    Reply
  8. Iceberg

     /  23rd March 2016

    Gawd what a great big fucking YAWN. That stuff is literally Management 101 from 1986. Serious businesses have been grappling successfully with this stuff for 100 years. It’s called planning for amd managing change. What are a couple of student councilors from the Labour Party going to add?

    Reply
    • Pantsdownbrown

       /  23rd March 2016

      On one of his secret missions Oliver got some behind-the-scenes covert footage of Labour working on their ‘future of work’ concept……..

      Reply

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