Cosgrove to stand down

Remember Clayton Cosgrove? He used to be MP for Waimakariri, first winning the seat in 1999, and became a Labour minister in the Clark government.

Cosgrove is only 46 but seems to be past his best by date as an MP.

This is what he looked like whenever this party website photo was taken:

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This was him giving his latest speech in Parliament on 4 April 2016:

Cosgrove20160405

He lost Waimakariri in 2011 and stood again in 2014, virtually hiding the fact that he was standing as a Labour candidate and implying he was still MP for the electorate, but failed again.

But he is still an MP thanks to his high enough ranking on the Labour list. But he has hardly been seen or heard of for the last few years, since the 2014 election in particular.

He has seemed like the MP when you don’t want to be an MP.

And he has just announced that he doesn’t want to continue to be an MP and will stand down before or by next year’s election.

Stuff: Labour MP Clayton Cosgrove will not seek re-election in 2017

Labour MP Clayton Cosgrove is to stand down at – or before – the next election.

The list MP – who had held the Waimakariri seat for four terms – said it was not a decision he made lightly. He had discussed it with his leader Andrew Little,”who understands this is about new challenges and opportunities for me”.

Cosgrove, 46, said he was elected when he was 30 and now was the right time to take the next step in his career.

“Before entering politics I held senior executive positions in business both in New Zealand and Australia, and so I feel extremely fortunate to have gained so much experience in both the private and public sector,” he said.

This is good news of sorts for Labour, who badly need dead wood out and replaced by dynamic new MPs.

Cosgrove is going voluntarily. It’s now up to Labour to come up with a suitable replacement.

Cosgrove is currently ranked 18 in Labour’s lineup.

On the Labour website: Latest from Clayton Cosgrove

That’s not very prolific.

 

Leave a comment

34 Comments

  1. kiwi dave

     /  10th April 2016

    Clayton – the MP you have when you’re not having an MP

    Reply
  2. Strong For Life

     /  10th April 2016

    This piece of deadwood should have been pruned years ago. Good riddance!

    Reply
  3. Strong For Life

     /  10th April 2016

    Cosgrove – this piece of deadwood should have been pruned years ago. Good riddance!

    Reply
  4. Nelly Smickers

     /  10th April 2016

    I seem to remember reading in that leaked email thingy from WO a couple of years ago, Judith Collins referred to Clayton Cosgrove as ‘Pluggie” – where on earth does that come from?

    Reply
    • Joe Bloggs

       /  10th April 2016

      Pluggie… Punch n Grow…

      References to Cogrove’s hair transplantation surgery years ago… a surgical technique that moves individual hair follicles from a hairy part of the body to a bald or balding part of the body … used to treat male pattern baldness.

      Reply
  5. artcroft

     /  10th April 2016

    To be replaced by Maryan Street who first entered parliament in 2005, so dead wood replaced with more dead wood. Oh and I don’t think the leader she helped roll (D Shearer) will be pleased to see her back. Happy days.

    Reply
    • I see that Labour is once again racing backwards to oblivion if Ms Street is back. At least it may get her off the street demonstrations but I am not planning on that. A clear indication of how far left Little is taking a once impressive party. Compare the UK experience?

      Reply
    • spanish_tudor

       /  10th April 2016

      Dead end Street

      Reply
  6. David

     /  10th April 2016

    replaced by someone dynamic, very funny, when was the last dynamic labour candidate selected ?

    Reply
  7. Corky

     /  10th April 2016

    I guess Clayton Cosgrove smelt the political wind, not that he’d need that keen a sense to realise no matter which way the next election goes there’s only pain waiting for him. Its either stand behind Andy as he tells the Nation Labour may have lost a fourth time to National, but as a party they are getting stronger and it will be fifth time lucky. Or its being called into Andies office and told he should “sling his hook.” Maybe he has already been told that? Best to go while he still has a modicum of dignity.

    Reply
    • Sorry Corky, my mind is boggling with what he smelt on the political wind, especially with Brownlie in the House!!

      Reply
      • Corky.

         /  10th April 2016

        Boggle no more, BJM. Your post may fall short of describing what Cosgrove was smelling in the House, but your sentiments are of the odious type voters detest. Just ask Hager.

        Reply
  8. John Schmidt

     /  10th April 2016

    All he could speak was vitriol. He had nothing positive to say ever. He is making a good choice to step down as I am sick of seeing him speak with such a forked tongue on TV. If he could convince material girl to do the same his time as MP would become a success.

    Reply
  9. Kitty Catkin

     /  10th April 2016

    Be fair, he’s spent almost half his life as an MP. If people thought that he was useless, he wouldn’t have been voted in, or wouldn’t have been the candidate. He may just be burned out.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  10th April 2016

      Which box should we tick?:

      1- Humour
      2- Sarcasm
      3- Undying loyalty
      4- Ignorance
      5- I’m testing your IQ
      6- All of the above

      Reply
      • Iceberg

         /  10th April 2016

        7. Glass is half full

        Reply
        • Iceberg

           /  10th April 2016

          Of sherry

          Reply
          • Corky.

             /  10th April 2016

            Lol, and a a quick quaff.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  11th April 2016

              I am no fan of Labour, but I don’t like to see someone being sneered at-being an MP is no sinecure.

              Being bald is something that many men are sensitive about; mocking someone’s personal appearance is very bad form.

              I don’t drink alcohol at all 🙂

  10. Pickled Possum

     /  10th April 2016

    So; the pluggie thing didn’t work for ever then?

    Reply
  11. spanish_tudor

     /  10th April 2016

    Cosgrove has always had a reputation as a nasty piece of work, right up there with Mallard in dishing out homophobic and sexist insults across the chamber (often not picked up, or more likely ignored, by the useless Margaret Wilson when she was Speaker).

    Reply
  12. Conspiratoor

     /  10th April 2016

    I wonder what georgey beyer is doing now? Last I heard she was on Paula’s payroll but is very keen to get back in the trough

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  11th April 2016

      The conception that being an MP is an easy ride is a wrong one, as anyone who has known any will be aware. Only people who have never known any would regard it as a trough. The hours are very long-they aren’t just working when the House is on.

      Reply
  13. Pete Kane

     /  11th April 2016

    I don’t think street coming back is not going to do much for Labour. Lets at least hope that the ‘assisted dying’ debate can progress a little more.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  11th April 2016

      Roger that. What do you reckon the chances are though? Her bill got dropped didn’t it?

      Reply
  14. Zedd

     /  11th April 2016

    methinks 2017 could see quite a bit of ‘deadwood’ being replaced.. hopefully the whole front bench of ‘Team Key’ 🙂 😀

    Reply
  15. Kitty Catkin

     /  11th April 2016

    I’d like to know how many people here would be willing to stand and put their money where their mouths are-see for themselves what the life of a politician is really like.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  11th April 2016

      Not me. It would be appallingly difficult. You are open to attack from everyone, especially Ministers. You’re away from home a lot. If you’re an electorate MP you’re probably always working. If you go into it you’ve got to take the rough with the salary and perks. But I don’t think it qualifies you for attacks on your personal appearance.

      Reply
      • Gezza, this subject I believe is a fundamental problem which needs to be addressed by Greater New Zealand. That is the status and stature of our MPs, Judiciary, Kaumatua, Religious leaders, teachers and local government representatives. We have all read the polls that rate the status of these people in the eyes of the greater community. Look at the results. You may have noticed I have omitted Journalists fom the list. The reason is they ae the lowest of the low. I really do believe we in New Zealand need to have a big think about what is happening in our society and why so many have such levels of contempt for our leaders? If we can’t sort this out then we have a huge problem. Look back on “Old Papers” and read the respect that even common criminals were reported. They retained their humanity in the eyes of the reporters. Now, we see Journalists imbued with the “tall poppy”syndrome attacking the reputation of senior leaders in the commu ity without restrain. Watch the next Press meeting between the media and any of our politicians, and ask yourself what was the motive behind the comment and question from the media representative? They are usually feeding their own egos and their promotion prospects by scoring cheap points. What they do not realise is that they are attacking the pillars of a decent and ethical community. Their duty is to report and investigate, not create the news!!

        Reply
        • kiwi dave

           /  11th April 2016

          Totally agree with your final comment. So-called “journalists” have turned into rude arrogant nobodies who think their only purpose is to be as rude and crude to whomever they are interviewing. I can’t name any that I have much respect for, let alone have any regard for their minimal intelligence as demonstrated by their inane questions.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  11th April 2016

          To be honest BJ I think everybody’s suffered a loss of respect for everyone’s dignity over time. I think you’re right that the media feed it.

          Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  11th April 2016

          Journalists are politicians without an electorate. They see their mission to convert the public to the real truth which is usually their own ideology. Reporters whose duty is “merely” to report the facts are the lowest caste in the media world. Worse, TV “journalists” are in show business. Their mission is to attract and keep bums on couches for the advertisers. That requires a story with goodies and baddies and scandal and scaremongering – the more emotive the better. The print tabloids are the same.

          None of which is compatible with respect for truth or person. As we see.

          Reply
          • jamie

             /  12th April 2016

            I agree about the show business aspect. That’s been the most damaging development in our media in recent decades IMO.

            I also think on close scrutiny a lot of the supposed political ideology that people complain of in the media is little more than market participants competing for eyeballs.

            It’s business. If they thought they’d get more eyeballs expressing a different bias, they’d do it in a heartbeat.

            Reply

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