Dog Poll

This is a good example of how online polls can be meaningless:

DogPoll

48 respondents in a self selecting poll where have the respondents seem to be taking the piss is not very useful.

But it is about an issue that has become topical for some reason – probably because the media have decided it’s a bit of a thing at the moment.

Apparently dog attacks are quite common, but deaths from dog attacks are quite uncommon. There’s many bigger dangers, like roads, swimming, boating and fishing, and suicide death rates are alarmingly high.

And of course general and domestic violence are still huge societal problems.

But that doesn’t mean we should ignore the dog problems.

Despite what the poll says it’s not very practical to ban people, and it’s difficult banning dog owners in advance of problems.

But we should think more about dog breeds. Some breeds are clearly a far greater risk than others. There are some breeds I would not want to have anything to do with, it seems odd that anyone would want a potentially vicious breed of dog unless they wanted to cause harm or didn’t care about causing harm.

But banning specific breeds has it’s problems too.

It would be nice to eliminate bad people and bad dogs but like many problems it’s far from simple.

Leave a comment

49 Comments

  1. Clemgeopin

     /  14th April 2016

    I am no expert in this, but I think a few measures may help (or not…)

    (1) Double the licence fees on ALL dogs, including puppies. (exception : Trained guide dogs for the blind)

    http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/licencesregulations/dogsandanimals/registration/Pages/DogFeeCalculator.aspx

    (2) Either ban the dangerous breeds or increase the licence fees on those about three fold to start with to discourage their breeding.

    (3) If any non guide dog in any public place anywhere is non muzzled and/or non chained, the dog should be confiscated or owner fined or loses the rights on that dog after one warning/fine.

    (4) Dog training classes and certificate should be mandatory for every dog and its owner.

    (4) If and when a dog attacks humans, not only the dog is taken and put out, the owner should incur very stiff fines.

    Just my thoughts….no idea if they are good ideas or too harsh.

    Reply
    • @ Clem – Basically I agree with you with bells on. Perhaps the muzzling provision might possibly be applied selectively by breed?

      If dog fees generally increased, perhaps quite dramatically, and were ‘staggered’ per breed or tagged to breed based on statistical danger, perhaps as a sort of ACC Levy – like all car owners shoulder the risk for those who have MVA injuries – this might

      a) reduce irresponsible dog ownership and encourage more forethought about it
      b) allow room for a carrot-type incentive of reduced fees for proof of spey-&-neuter?
      Personally I’d make spey-&-neuter mandatory for certain breeds and cross-breeds regardless, other than registered breeders.

      Pit Bulls, Staffordshire Terriers and Dobermans, a few other breeds and their crosses are apparently responsible for far-and-away the majority of attacks. Phase them out medium term with a non-replacement policy. Your dog, if safe, can live out its life but you can’t own another one like it if its a dangerous breed.

      Yep, one strike and you’re out, with a very low threshold on what constitutes a ‘strike’.

      Reply
      • Pantsdownbrown

         /  14th April 2016

        PZ: “Pit Bulls, Staffordshire Terriers and Dobermans, a few other breeds and their crosses are apparently responsible for far-and-away the majority of attacks. Phase them out medium term with a non-replacement policy. Your dog, if safe, can live out its life but you can’t own another one like it if its a dangerous breed”

        Has been tried elsewhere and all that happens is other dog breeds are then trained to be aggressive by their owners.

        ANY dog can be turned into an aggressive weapon.

        Reply
        • Nelly Smickers

           /  14th April 2016

          Not sure why everyone is so ‘anti’ Pitt Bulls ?

          Wayne’s brother has one, and it gets on real well with all the other dogs in the street 👿

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  14th April 2016

            With pit bulls it’s not so much the getting on that’s the problem as getting them off.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  15th April 2016

              I have said before that the few pitbulls I have met have been very polite and refined, but I’m not stupid enough to think that this means they’re all like that.

              The ideas put forward would probably be unworkable-muzzling and chaining a Sydney Silkie or Miniature Schnauzer is going overboard and if all dogs had to be, they would. The severe proposed laws would be expensive to implement as well.

              It might work if all dogs were licensed, but they are not as we all know.Doubling the fees would punish everyone and discourage people from registering dogs.

              Why only guide dogs ? There are many types of dogs who help disabled people.

    • Missy

       /  14th April 2016

      ” Double the licence fees on ALL dogs, including puppies. (exception : Trained guide dogs for the blind)”

      This sounds good in principle, but there is already an issue with people in some areas not paying dog licence fees as it is, this will exacerbate that problem and do nothing about good ownership. All raising fees does is increase non-compliance.

      “Either ban the dangerous breeds or increase the licence fees on those about three fold to start with to discourage their breeding.”

      See above about the second part of this. I am against banning breeds – where do you start? where do you stop? I was attacked by a Terrier, and owned a German Shepherd (supposedly a dangerous breed) who was the sweetest dog out, but as she came from the SPCA and had been abused she still had a tendency to unexpectedly snap if someone got too close to her rear end (we believe she had been repeatedly hit or swung by her tail).

      “If any non guide dog in any public place anywhere is non muzzled and/or non chained, the dog should be confiscated or owner fined or loses the rights on that dog after one warning/fine.” Some areas already have by laws around muzzling dogs, and having them on a leash (I prefer that term to chained – chains can be used to abuse animals). Also note that there needs to be open areas for dogs to get exercise.

      “Dog training classes and certificate should be mandatory for every dog and its owner.” I agree with this, however, there can be an issue with this as some dog schools in the past have taught some quite suspect techniques which would only increase the aggression in some breeds, (It has been a while since I had my dog so this may have changed). If this is brought in there would need to be some very strict policing of the obedience classes and teachers. An example is, as my dog was still a puppy when I got her from the SPCA she was still a little bit nippy, and would also ‘mouth’ as her teeth were coming through, the teacher at the dog class told me to bite her ear when she did that – when I told my vet he was horrified, he said a firm ‘no’ would be all that was required and she would soon break the habit – sure enough the vet was correct.

      “If and when a dog attacks humans, not only the dog is taken and put out, the owner should incur very stiff fines. ”

      Now, this is something I have some very big problems with. There are any number of reasons that dogs attack, and it is not always as a result of it being a dangerous dog or the owner being irresponsible. Dogs will often attacked when provoked, I know of a case about 10 years ago, a dog that was well fenced in and the property met all of the requirements, attacked a kid because the kid got a ladder, climbed to the top of the fence and started throwing stones at the dog, when the dog moved out of range the kid then jumped into the backyard chased the dog continually throwing stones, and the picked up a stick and started hitting and stabbing at the dog with the stick. The dog was (in my opinion) unfairly destroyed – the child should have been the one put down, he trespassed and abused the dog – the dog was only defending itself, but people who think that a dog attack is automatically the dogs fault screamed for blood and demanded the dog be put down. Disgraceful.

      Perhaps when kids are taught about safety in school they are also taught about approaching unknown (or even known) animals, how to do it correctly, and how to treat the animal – and taught NOT to throw things or hit the animal.

      Reply
      • Robby

         /  15th April 2016

        Can’t argue with any of that Missy. There is a parallel that can be drawn between training dogs and children. If both are trained well in how to relate to others, both will become friendly and loyal adults. If you abandoned a child for 8+ hours every weekday in your backyard, with just enough food and water to survive, you would most likely be convicted of neglect. Yet this is the same sad meathook reality, that faces countless numbers of “man’s best friend”, every day on the south side of the so called “City of Sails”.
        With burglary resolution rates as low as they are, is it really surprising that people have come to the realisation that ‘prevention is better than a cure’? But at what cost??? Having a frustrated angry animal around that you feed twice a day???
        This isn’t a ‘Dog Problem’, its a societal one.

        Reply
        • Missy

           /  15th April 2016

          Agree Robby. When I had my dog I was at University and still at my parents home, so she was rarely left alone for more than an hour or two – and that is after I had had her for about 3 months or more so she was fully comfortable with her surroundings, but now I am not in that position and am away from home for well over 8 hours a day, so I would never contemplate having a dog now, no matter how much I would want one.

          And you bring up a good point about frustrated animals, there is no doubt a lot of frustration in the dogs when they are left alone and that no doubt leads to them lashing out. I think there a lot of people who forget Dogs are pack animals, they need to have company and to be around people / dogs, but also they need to be made aware they are not the owner’s equal or superior, but rather inferior, in fact dogs have to be shown that they are the bottom of the pecking order in the house!

          There are definitely a lot of societal issues around dog ownership, from bad owners, badly trained dogs, a lack of knowledge on how to behave around dogs, people who think dogs are just like humans (clue: they aren’t!), those who have little respect for the animal and treats them badly, and then the potentially good owners who don’t mistreat their animals but smother them with love and treat them like their children – which is just as bad when dealing with dogs.

          Rant over! 🙂

          Though in all of this, it is the dogs I feel sorry for most, all are demonised when things like this happen, and many are not vicious animals, and of the one’s that are there is usually an underlying cause.

          Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  15th April 2016

        The child who grabbed and pulled the dog’s balls deserved all he got-the dog had growled warnings at it, and it was a well-behaved dog.

        I was bitten in the street by a fairly small dog-it and another dog were fighting and it suddenly ran over and bit me, although I wasn’t very near and was doing nothing to attract their attention to me. When I was a Census collector, I called at a house where the owner had a number of tiny dogs, and they were vicious little sods, They may have got away with it because who’d want to make a complaint about being bitten by those tiny things-I was and it was really painful. their teeth were like needles, but I’d have felt a real fool going to Dog Control.

        Missy, I know someone who had an Alsatian, and when the house was burgled, Alsatian took a fancy to the burglar, followed him around and was sorry when he went. (He was caught and told the Police about this as he thought it so funny, and the Police told the people-who also had to laugh)

        Of course my dog knows who’s at the bottom of the pecking order-and when a friend’s dog was staying, I was the lowest of the three of us 😀

        Reply
        • Missy

           /  16th April 2016

          Kitty, I tell you, those German Shepherd’s are the biggest softies out I am sure of it, I can quite believe it befriended a burglar! The electricity company had a note that there was a dog at our house and the first time a new meter reader came (an ex dog control officer coincidentally) he laughed when he saw me holding her collar, I explained it was because she would want to play and probably would lick him to death – he laughed again and said the dog note had said ‘beware – very very friendly dog!’. 🙂

          Tiny dogs are terrible, they are incredibly vicious, mine was a bit of a sook, and she hated tiny dogs, used to hide behind me, I think it was because they could only reach her tail and would nip at it. :/

          Both me and my dog knew who ruled our house – it was the cat!

          Reply
  2. 48 respondents in a self selecting poll where have the respondents seem to be taking the piss is not very useful.

    I dunno, there’s the subtle point that any survey that frames all the possible solutions to a problem in terms of banning things deserves to be mocked.

    Reply
  3. Pete, the poll isn’t meaningless at all. It speaks volumes about how unfeeling our society has become; and some of your comments speak volumes about how selectively comparative our unfeeling society has become as well. We could NOT deal with a whole raft of problems simply because worse ones exist. Why deal with domestic violence when there’s murder?

    It seems we are not prepared to address the hard choice between children having their faces chewed off and irresponsible people owning dangerous dog breeds? We should tackle owner and breed; regulatory environment; licensing, breeding and enforcement; root, branch and stem; chapter and verse. Full f*%king stop!

    Meantime, in the few days since the attack that prompted the latest wave of outrage, there have been at least 3 more serious attacks, including –

    “On Tuesday night, a heavily pregnant woman was attacked by a dog in Christchurch.”

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11622604

    Reply
  4. Pantsdownbrown

     /  14th April 2016

    48 respondents is a meaningless poll…….

    Reply
    • @ PDB – Oh yeah, I agree, and the questions were real funny!

      Analogy. When a person stands on a stage facing a live audience and does absolutely nothing (other than breath) they are saying nothing, right? It has no meaning?

      Wrong! They are saying “I’m courageous enough to stand here facing you my audience. See?” They are demonstrating it. It is packed with meaning …

      There is always a message in the medium; a meaning. The meaning in Lachlan C%#tsyth’s poll is evident for all to see. Bit of a laugh, eh? Take the heat of the dog breeds?

      Reply
  5. Jeez…ban dogs, muzzle them yada yada yada.

    When I was a kid we were told: don’t approach a strange dog they can bite if afraid or scared or you go on their territory

    we were told don’t stick your face in a dogs face – you will get bitten

    we were told ask the owner before approaching their dog – they can control the dog and may say no. Some dogs are just nervous around strangers and growl and bark to make you stay away – and will bite if you don’t back off. Its how dogs communicate

    And many other little nuggets.

    Any dog is capable of biting. any dog…

    Maybe the application of some common sense and parental responsibility may help the problem.

    Having said that I don’t trust pitties, Alsatians and foxies are pain with their ankle nipping but have never had problems with other breeds because I don’t bail them up and I don’t make them feel scared…

    Reply
    • Robby

       /  14th April 2016

      Maybe the application of some common sense and parental responsibility may help the problem.

      Yes Dave, that is all well and good, until you get confronted on your own property by some mongrel whose owner didn’t secure it properly.

      Reply
      • Yeah well Robbie I have been and haven’t been bitten..

        Most wandering dogs know they are in the wrong being off they own home patch and, if not cornered, will run like hell.

        My comment is a response to the ott knee jerk legislate and ban and muzzle comments in the thread above. Its a pity that is some peoples first reaction to a problem – reach for the big control stick…

        Typical the Gubbermint must do something stuff.

        No denying there are some nasty dogs out there – made that way by nasty and uncaring people.

        Very few dogs that are socialised properly are a problem Robby. Pity we can’t socialise the feral people who cause the feral dog problem ah…but we can’t call ferals feral now can we….

        Reply
        • Robby

           /  14th April 2016

          I would agree that people are the problem Dave. People like the owner of the dog that ran off it’s unfenced property and bit me on the leg. People like the owners of the dog that challenged me in my backyard (when by some happy coincidence I was turning over my vege garden. Stupid dog… 😉 ).
          It seems a tad strange to me that people need a licence to own firearms, yet any old idiot can just buy a dog off trademe. Both are deadly weapons in the wrong hands….

          Reply
        • @ dave1924 – Let’s call a feral a feral AS WELL!? Also. In addition to.

          What level do the statistics have to reach before we take some action? Before the Gubbermint (as you so despisingly put it) does something on our behest and behalf, they being … wait for it … elected by us to do things on our behalf!

          Dog attacks are already 27 ED presentations a day, 2 hospital admissions, 99,000 reported in 10 years. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11490920

          Muzzle and ban particular breeds, charge their owners more to license them. You own brand XYZ of motor car, which is statistically a very dangerous car, you pay more rego, the police take note of you, etc etc. You individually may be the safest driver in the world. Tough.

          We, collectively, through our Gubbermints – our voter selves – have brought this situation upon ourselves. Yes, we should all suffer a little bit, certain breeds and owners of these breeds should suffer more and the ferals and feral dogs suffer most.

          Reply
          • Missy

             /  15th April 2016

            It is all fair enough calling for action against dogs and dog owners, but what about those that provoke dogs through aggression, abuse and other forms of violence, surely if someone is involved in hurting a dog through their own actions then they should be the one’s dealt with, not the dog or the dog owner – or are you okay with someone going onto private property, provoking a dog and then having the dog and owner punished when the dog attacks?

            It is more complicated than you, and others, are making it.

            Reply
        • Gezza

           /  14th April 2016

          “There are two elements that determine a dogs final character….genetics and its enviroment.
          Some dogs like pitbulls are bred to kill, some to retrieve (labradors), others to work sheep.
          The enviroment modifies these characters but when the chips are down, when instinct takes over the dog reverts to type….what it is bred for genetically.
          That is why it is unwise to let your guard down around a pitbull or any other dog for that matter with a genetic predisposition that has been selected to fight, maim and kill.

          Alistar M McKellow BVSC BA Dip Acupuncture
          Veterinarian
          RNZSPCA Mobile Clinic”

          Reply
          • @ Gezza – “unwise to let your guard down around a pitbull or any other dog for that matter with a genetic predisposition that has been selected to fight, maim and kill.”

            No, it’s genuinely unwise to create an environment where you have to have your f%#ken guard up all the time or around or because of these dogs! Especially given that some of the childer people in this environment we’ve created for them don’t even have ‘guards’ yet to f#cken well put up!

            (Please excuse my language. The subject brings out the best in me)

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  14th April 2016

              I am excusing your language I know you feel strongly about this and I understand why. Mongrels are a problem, you get an unpredictable temperament and how you regulate there I haven’t figured out. As I’ve said it’s dog city where I live but they’re mostly purebreeds or recognised hybrids like labradoodles with good owners who control them well and walk them daily. Very common to see some of these wearing muzzles though, my pick is the owner has decided to do it for safety. I’m for compulsory training + licencing.

              Sorry coming in here with just that, going back up to read the whole thread to see if I have anything of use to say.

            • Gezza

               /  14th April 2016

              @ PZ PS there’s nothing wrong with your language you won’t even say fucking. No muzzle required for you my boy.

          • Corky

             /  14th April 2016

            Here’s an irony for you Gezza. Genuine old school dog breeders in the States who bred Pitbulls for fighting put a bullet in the head of any young pup who by nature shows aggression to humans. That stops a genetic potential from being on-bred. Conversely, fakkwits around the world who breed Pitbulls believe an animal who shows aggression to all creatures, including humans, is a dog showing the genuine Pitbull temperament. Not so.

            It also need to be remembered other fighting breeds can inflict much more damage in the dog ring and against humans. The Neapolitan Mastiff is capable of tearing a Pitbull in half (literally) That’s within the first 10 minutes of a pit fight .After that the Pitbull usually gains ascendency and wins. Hence, why dog men don’t breed other fighting breeds for the pit. That means other fighting breeds have their genetic potential controlled because they aren’t being continually breed to enhance their natural fighting potential.

            That said, no genuine fighting dog breeder would ever say you can treat a Pitbull like other dogs. They need hard exercise every day, otherwise their energy pents up. Pitbulls love sledge pulling and weightlifting. They will do these until they drop.

            The urban environment, is not in my opinion suitable for most breeds of fighting dog.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  14th April 2016

              What earthly purpose do you need a fighting dog for Corky? In what useful way is it a cool idea to breed a dog for the express purpose of fighting and killing other dogs?

            • Corky

               /  14th April 2016

              Don’t know, never done it.

            • Gezza

               /  14th April 2016

              In the dog attack that’s kicked this latest round of hand-wringing off I gather all the child did was get up suddenly off the couch and the pit bull reacted instantaneously and instinctively to attack. Get rid of the bloody things.

            • Corky

               /  14th April 2016

              Correction- but I have owned a fighting dog.

            • Gezza

               /  14th April 2016

              Well it sounds like you might have been lucky it never attacked anyone Corky. Probably most people’s fighting dogs have never attacked anyone, but from what that vet says above, if one does it’s just one flash of instinct trumping all the control and love the owner’s put into it.

            • Robby

               /  14th April 2016

              @Corky
              What breed? How would you rate its temperament?

            • Corky

               /  14th April 2016

              It was a Neo-Mastiff. They have a temperament similar to pitbulls- but, they can be socialised, although they’re always suspicious of strangers.
              And they will kill you outright should you hurt their family. Check a photo out. Thing is you don’t hear of them attacking people. And the reason is they are not continually being bred to fight. I wonder what the pitbull bred would be like if that was also the case? But its too late now.
              Too many back yard breeders have created monsters.

              My Neo patrolled 5 acres and was a great dog. And a large area is what you need for such dogs.

              There are no guarantees with any animal, and as I have said above, these breeds need special care. I dont have dogs now so I’m lucky I don’t have the burden of a possible dog attack on my mind. . All I need to worry about now is a homo sapien attacker.

            • Robby

               /  15th April 2016

              My Neo patrolled 5 acres and was a great dog. And a large area is what you need for such dogs

              These words alone prove you are not the sort of owner society needs to be concerned about Corky. Intruders maybe tho’… 😉

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  15th April 2016

            What meaning can there be in taking people’s money and just standing there breathing, except that anyone doing it would be taking money under false pretences ?

            PZ, a poll with so few is meaningless. and the number who said ‘ban people’ aren’t uncaring, they’re people who couldn’t resist it.It can’t have been serious with that in it.

            Reply
        • Gezza

           /  14th April 2016

          (I did want to push that bloke off the stage though cos I couldn’t really figure out what the hell he was doing about all this.)

          Reply
    • @ dave1924 – I’d hazard a guess when you were a kid these dangerous breeds didn’t exist in NZ? They didn’t in my childhood. A 6 or 10 year old child simply may not have the resources yet to a) practice what’s been preached them or b) deal with being confronted by one of these monsters?

      The measures to deal with this pressing issue do not exclude ongoing common sense anyhow. “Ban Dogs”, like “Ban People” in the poll was a sick joke. Asking the owner is a good idea, if the owner is there. What if the dog is tied to a post while the owner orders their coffee? Parental responsibility yes absolutely, like dog owner responsibility.

      “Any dog is capable of biting. any dog…” Sure, we all acknowledge this. It’s just a fact that relatively few breeds do the vast majority of damage, and I’ve seen/treated the damage, close-up, in the flesh.

      If the LTSA computer can work out the risk factor of every make and model of motor vehicle sure as hell a dog control database can work it our for dog breeds and apply selective pricing and rules. Let’s get on with it. I don’t care how many people protest the natural tendencies or innocence of their dogs: people come first, especially children.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  15th April 2016

        I can’t remember if those breeds were around or not, but I remember my little brother being bitten by an Alsatian.

        Reply
    • Missy

       /  15th April 2016

      Dave, on the whole I agree with you, but the kids AND PARENTS should also treat the dog as the owner instructs.

      I had a situation with my dog when some kid wanted to pat her, the mother asked, I said yes, made my dog lie down and explained to the child where to pat her, I also was explicit to both the child and mother NOT to touch her hindquarters or tail as she had been abused by a previous owner and was very sensitive around that area and would snap, so what did the stupid kid do? run around behind me and pull my dog’s tail, and the mother had the nerve to blame me when the dog growled and snapped at her kid – I told her she was lucky the kid didn’t get bitten and it served the kid right as I had warned them both not to do that, and that the mother should perhaps have better control of her kid – I also pointed out as my dog hadn’t bitten the kid she was obviously better behaved than her kid. (rant over!).

      I haven’t had a lot to do with Pitbulls so can’t comment on them, I hate small yappy dogs, but I love German Shepherds (aka Alsations), they are beautiful dogs and incredibly intelligent as well. And most are very well trained.

      Reply
  6. Pantsdownbrown

     /  14th April 2016

    Some people may find this an interesting read on the subject. Includes the history of dog control in this country.

    http://www.otago.ac.nz/law/research/journals/otago065275.pdf

    Reply
    • Robby

       /  14th April 2016

      A good read alright PDB, very interesting how stock appear to be better protected than people under the law.

      Reply
  7. Gezza

     /  15th April 2016

    I’ve been bitten 3 times, but all before I knew anything about dogs. This is a very good resource. If reflects what I’ve learnt about them.
    http://www.dogsafety.govt.nz/

    Reply
    • Robby

       /  15th April 2016

      That is a REALLY good resource Gezza. That is the first time I have seen it, which concerns me as a parent.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  15th April 2016

        Yes it’s good isn’t it. If you grew without knowing or interacting with a variety of dogs like I did you have absolutely no idea how to behave around them, and that = a lot of children and adults still. The times I was bitten I had done nothing to provoke the attack: 2 were where I encountered a large dog loose in the street.

        One was a stunningly beautiful collie that just decided to stroll alongside me as I walked to work. I chatted to it as it walked along, didn’t try to pat it. All of a sudden it just snarled and bit me on the hip, then ran off to about 6 feet away, growling and baring it’s teeth. I picked up some stones and made motions as if to throw them and it went away. Had to go to the doc and get checked, just some bruising and abraded skin luckily.

        The first was when I went to pat a dog as a youngster, with the owner’s ok, and as we had a cat I naturally went to pat it on the head without letting it sniff my hand first. It saw it as an attack and bit me. Just a nip, no harm done, but it put me off going anywhere near dogs for years as I didn’t understand or trust them. Still don’t, I approach them all carefully and I’ve had a foxy.

        Dog education for kids is probably a good idea as long as we are going to have dogs around, and we are, they’re wonderful pets. That resource tells you a lot of very important stuff about dogs in a very short, simple and clear format.

        Reply
  8. Zedd

     /  15th April 2016

    I used to know a guy who trained Police dogs.. he told me ‘There are no bad dogs.. only bad owners’ I tend to agree. Often people get these agro looking dogs as an extension of their own bad attitudes.
    Maybe councils should have a ‘warrant of fitness’ for dog owners ? :/

    Reply
    • Missy

       /  15th April 2016

      Zedd, there is a ‘warrant of fitness’ of sorts for owners, it is the licence. Dog owners have their licence fee determined by what kind of owner they are, the problem is not all people with a dog will register it with the council. Just look at that story earlier this year of the dog that was microchipped, but it was stolen and sold to some family who could not afford the licence fee, or vet bills, so didn’t register the dog – if they had they may have found out it was stolen a lot earlier. There are a lot of people like this, and when people sell puppies on the internet because they don’t desex their pets and they get pregnant then it becomes a nightmare for councils to control and monitor.

      Reply
  9. Missy

     /  15th April 2016

    An interesting point on this, the worst animal attack I ever suffered was from a cat – and as a result I contracted Toxoplasmosis, which made me quite sick for a long time. Maybe we should also be looking at owners of dangerous cats too?

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  15th April 2016

      When I was a child, a neighbour had a terrifying experience when a cat came into their section as she was hanging the washing out…and attacked her. It was unprovoked-she hadn’t even shooed it away. My mother said that the neighbour was a real mess, physically and mentally and I don’t wonder. I don’t think that she had a disease afterwards, but she had some really bad wounds and, of course, the terror of being so surprising;attacked by an animal that one would never expect it from !

      My late husband ended up in hospital when he was bitten by a pet rat. Needless to say that we kept quiet about the reason for this, it was so embarrassing and totally untypical.

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  16th April 2016

        Essentially all animals are liable to attack, as a kid I was bitten by a friends rabbit!

        Cats are pretty bad though because there usually isn’t warning that they will attack, they just do, and then you get the one’s that are wild, they are really vicious.

        A pet rat, nice, I wanted one of those, but my dad hates rodents – I wasn’t even allowed a guinea pig, we were only allowed a dog, cat and budgie! Now I really am not in a suitable lifestyle for a pet – and rats are too much hard work, with needing to clean the cages regularly.

        Reply

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