Warm weather continues

Following record high overall temperatures for the first months of this year May has begun with unusually high temperatures for this time of year.

And according to the Metservice this looks likely to continue, with highs of 19, 22, 17, 17 forecast in Dunedin over the next four days, dropping t 13-15 over the next week, still not particularly cool for May. The average high in May for Dunedin is 12.7 degrees.

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The lows forecast over the next ten days range from 8-11 degrees.

The lowest low over the past month has been 6, which isn’t bad for an overnight temperature.

No sign of any pre-wintry blasts from the Antarctic.

This isn’t a complaint about a continuation of a very good run of weather this year, it’s been great and we’ve had the best growing conditions I can remember here, even though rainfall has been relatively low and infrequent.

Long may the balmy weather continue – as long as it doesn’t creep south and melt an ice shelf or two.

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28 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  3rd May 2016

    I was down in Taupo last week and commented on how short the grass is compared with our lush pastures and was told how little rain they have had. We have had so much warm wet weather everything has grown rampantly. The downside is the rain is starting to ruin my driveway on the steep bits and I’m going to need repairs to the gravel.

    Reply
    • Eliza M

       /  3rd May 2016

      Gravel driveways are for the Serfs, Alan. It should be laid in ersatz cobblestones to act as a signifier of your elevated position in society.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  3rd May 2016

        It’s seven hundred metres long and cost $30K as it is, Eliza. I don’t think the kikuyu would respect cobblestones any more than it does brown rock and shingle. My position, elevated or otherwise doesn’t require any status symbols – just things that work and people and animals enjoy.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  3rd May 2016

          We had kikuyu take over the 1/4 acre lawn. Mower just bounced around on the bloody stuff. At least when we got in an irish brotherly punch up over a difference of opinion about the beatles and the stones it didn’t hurt when you hit the ground.l

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  3rd May 2016

            Yes, it’s up to our waist in places now. Tough as wire to cut but frost and glyphosate knock it back until it comes again. I have to use a pick axe to clear spots for plantings.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  3rd May 2016

              It must be great for making rope. You get frost up there? How far inland are you? One the things that tells me the climate’s warming (whatever the cause) is that down here in Welly we’ve fewer and fewer frosts each Winter. Maybe 10 light frosts last Winter where I am in Northern suburbs.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  3rd May 2016

              Last winter we had a couple of frosts that really knocked the kikuyu. First I’ve noticed since living here since 2000. Must be global warming.

            • Gezza

               /  3rd May 2016

              Not down here. Can’t be global. Probably regional warming.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  3rd May 2016

              I’ll blame PZ then. Too much b.s. emissions and hot rock causing our frosts.

            • Gezza

               /  3rd May 2016

              Won’t bother PZ. He can take it. He’s incredibly resilient.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  3rd May 2016

              Bloody stuff. I knew the daughter of the man who introduced it to this area-I bet that a few people would gladly dance on his grave if they knew who it was. The only thing that takes care of it is a weedeeater. It grows over my path, so I have been making a point of pulling some up every time I walk up it. It makes the place look so unkempt.

              Gravel is hardly for serfs, unless they were laying it, I have never seen a ‘stately home’ that didn’t have it. Fake cobbles would look dreadful-why not have real pavers ? Calling things ersatz or faux won’t make them any less fake.

              Prepare for a good laugh-google kikuyu/couch and be told that it’s one of the most popular grasses. Not round here, it’s not.

              It’s been in the mid-20s where I am; I put a thermometer outside so that I can faint when I look at it on sweltering Waikato days-why I need to know that it’s in the mid-30s except to make myself feel even hotter, I don’t know. It’s so warm today that everyone’s in t-shirts and I have doors and windows open.

            • Eliza M

               /  3rd May 2016

              “Calling things ersatz or faux won’t make them any less fake. ”

              And in an another effort to show she knows what a word means she let’s the meaning of what is being said whizz right over her head. Bravo kitty with a small k.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  3rd May 2016

              ‘let’s’ ?

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  3rd May 2016

        Dear eliza/lizzie, get over yourself.

        It was obvious that you were trying to sound clever-but didn’t really know what serfs were or you wouldn’t have had them in upper case. Stop trying to sabotage discussions, you’re beginning to sound like mrMan and other trolls who have infiltrated Your NZ at various times with your gratuitous nastiness.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  3rd May 2016

          Eliza makes me laugh, Kitty. I bet she’s a heap more snobby than me and does far less crap work, like helping friends with plumbing and doing my own, humping a backpack around paddocks, hills and bush tracks spraying gorse, building sheds, a loo, making beds and doing laundry for our holiday house, fixing friends watches and computers, sorting and trucking rubbish and recycling to our tip and recycle centre, turning over compost bins, walking our dogs and doing most of our cooking.

          So while she sneers from her Lefty high horse I’m shovelling up real horse poo for another friend’s garden and chuckling at her ignorance.

          Reply
          • Eliza M

             /  3rd May 2016

            Did you find some mushrooms up on the hills today Alan? Blueish ones?

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  3rd May 2016

              No. Plenty of other coloured fungi though. Don’t think I’d eat them but you are welcome to.

        • Eliza M

           /  3rd May 2016

          Cleverer than you. Small k.
          An auto-corrected capital and apostrophe are not the crimes against intellegence you think they are – being a spelling-nazi though, that is.

          Reply
  2. Zedd

     /  3rd May 2016

    Still ‘no evidence’ of climate change folks ? :/

    ….believe it OR not….. 😦

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  3rd May 2016

      As I’ve noted before Zedd, the increase in temperature this year since the last El Nino in 1998 represents a rate of increase of global temperature of about 0.6 deg C per century, or somewhat less than the slow 1 deg C per century averaged over the past hundred years.

      Climate change, yes. Escalating panic, no. Evidence of greenhouse gas impact, not much if any.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  3rd May 2016

        A friend who knows thinks that it’s both-cyclical with some help from gg. But when one hears the actual figures….how do the panickers explain the changes to and fro in the past ?

        It’s totally irresponsible when people claim that the glaciers are melting etc etc to ‘prove’ their claims.

        Reply
      • Zedd

         /  3rd May 2016

        @AW

        “Don’t panic Mr. Mainwaring… Don’t Panic.. DON’T PANIC !!!” sez Corp. Jones 😀

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  3rd May 2016

          Two people must think that there have never been fluctuations in temperatures before, despite various ice ages being well documented and that it’s acceptable to make false claims to ‘prove’ a point-how very odd.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  3rd May 2016

            Zedd-can you believe that people still cry ‘Don’t tell him. Pike !’ when they see Ian Lavender in the street ?

            Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  3rd May 2016

          Take his advice, Zedd.

          Reply
  3. Blazer

     /  3rd May 2016

    I remember going to school in winter in Auckland,gloves because your hands were so cold,the frost in the morning,you could crunch’ the grass and puddles iced over.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  3rd May 2016

      Same in Taranaki where I grew up, and here when I moved to Wellers in 1974. Haven’t seen a frozen puddle anywhere around my area in Winter in Northern Welly for well over a decade.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  3rd May 2016

        We occasionally have them, but many years there aren’t any now. Some years ago we had a little fluster of snow-it looked like a sunshower, all sparkly-but it didn’t settle or show up in a photograph. I took some against the dark fence, but they looked like photographs of a fence. We were told that it wasn’t snow, but we all kept calling it that so the weather people gave up, I think. It was the first within living memory. We all wanted it to be snow, so as far as everyone here was concerned, it was.

        Funny memory-we had a few frosts a winter or two ago, and the surface of the birds’ drinking bowl froze over. It’s a shallow oval dish about the size of a notebook keyboard, and I saw a waxeye skating on it. He was having a beautiful tlme, whizzing to and fro with outspread wings. He was probably crying “WHEEEEEEE !’ Talk about Torville and Dean, the waxeye left them nowhere 😀

        Remember ‘smoking’ on the way to school in winter ? Putting two fingers to your mouth and then blowing out ‘smoke’.

        Reply

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