Vendettas and death notices

Cameron Slater has claimed he has had death threats as a result of the news onslaught yesterday.

I hope Judge McIlraith is watching the comments, the death threats have started. He didn’t think this was such a problem.

 

original

While it could be perceived as a threat of violence it doesn’t go as far as being a death threat, but is nasty it is unfortunately not uncommon talk online.

Something that was apparent yesterday was Slater’s continued association with Lauda Finem.

Two days ago LF posted an attack on  Ben Rachinger and others, and blatantly included information subject to court ordered suppression, and some of that suppression is still in force. There are not many possible sources for the judgment they published in full (actually it was a first version of the judgment that was corrected).

Then remarkably early yesterday LF published a media statement from Slater that also breached suppression. That seems certain to have been sourced from Slater.

After several hours it was taken down, in itself remarkable as the previous day LF refused to amend a false claim they made about Bradley Ambrose. This suggests preferential treatment for Slater at LF.

Then this exchange appeared on Twitter:

LFSpringTwitter

Spring coughing over vendettas alongside tweets involving Slater and LF is more than a little ironic.

Talking of vendettas this comment appeared on LF about the same time as the Slater statement appeared (overnight Monday):

DeathNoticeRedacted

Redacted comments breach the law and make false claims.

I don’t think that was Slater, but that’s the sort of people and website he associates and utilises. And that’s a more serious implication of a death threat than what he complained about.

I condemn any threats, implied or otherwise, of violence or death, including against Slater.

I wonder if Slater would likewise openly condemn the threat aimed at me, and ask his friends to take down this threat like his statement was taken down.

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21 Comments

  1. No would be the answer there Pete. You need to remember you are one of the few adults in the cr#p infested sandpit that is political blogging and commentary these days. Thank God the moderate and sane voice has YourNZ.

    Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  11th May 2016

    Law 2, Cockroaches 0

    Reply
  3. duperez

     /  11th May 2016

    I read the Famous Five when I was a kid. Sometimes now when I read “overseas” sites with all sorts of intrigues I’m reminded of that series of books. From memory Enid Blyton did not have spelling mistakes though and was not amateur like one of those places I stumble into.

    Enid might be jealous though that she had to make the fiction plausible while no such restriction seems to be necessary now.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  11th May 2016

      I only discovered these wonderful books a few years ago, and am now an addict ! The adventures are real and the threats in them are-well, we know that none of them WILL be shot (and they are reasonably often threatened with this) or whatever the villains menace them with, but they are serious ! EB rocks ! If two Indian PhD students (one at NYC) can love them still as comfort reading (?) , I can. The old copies are the best.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  11th May 2016

        How on earth did you miss them as a kid, Kitty? I read all of them and then graduated to all the Arthur Ransom books. `

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  11th May 2016

          I was brought up to despise them.My mother must be spinning in her grave. I remember reading all the Ransomes when I was very young. Now I have a bookcase with nothing but EB in it (one of those four tier ones) and find them marvellous for comfort reading. I am not as fond of her fairy tales, but the others are really well written. One literary critic sneered at the ordinariness of many of the characters-but to me that’s much of the point. It makes it seem as if these things could happen to oneself. I love the Barney ones, and the Find-Outers. It’s funny to think that the name Mr Plod has become a generic name for a policeman.

          I discovered the Biggles books a few years ago. It’s a pity that these are relegated to the children’s section-they’re damned good yarns and Biggles and co are not young lads, they’re adults.

          The William books were never intended to be for children, either, one appreciates them much more as an adult. I remember sitting on a bench in the main street of Hamilton a few years ago reading one that I’d just bought and crying with laughter. An Indian friend did this on a train in Bombay and, like me, made a complete public spectacle of himself.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  11th May 2016

            Oh yes, I read all those too. Loved the Biggles ones when I was a bit older.

            Reply
  4. Joe Bloggs

     /  11th May 2016

    Really PeteG I don’t know why you continue to give that odious L* website airspace. They’re a foul stain on the blogosphere and need to be starved of oxygen.

    As for Slater’s so-called death threats? Meh…when it comes to sucking it up and accepting the consequences, it’s too hot in the kitchen for the likes of the wood-louse…

    These twunts remind me of an ex-friend and long-time alcoholic. They’re pathologically unable to accept responsibility for their lives so make misery out of other lives.

    Reply
    • well Slater emerges from this as still a liar, a and a hypocrite, but I guess we knew that.
      The funniest part for me was reading the screenshots of the chats, the guy is thick! and I mean, really thick. Comedy gold. 🙂

      Reply
  5. MaureenW

     /  11th May 2016

    It astounds me that Slater & Co don’t just shut up. He’s behaving just as those he’s vilified and criticized in the past. Hypocrite, blabber-mouth, victim, gullible fool and still trying to cast blame on others even though he’s accepted diversion for his failed attempt at utu.
    IMO, he should gracefully “take it on the chin” and find another story that doesn’t highlight how he was baited, reeled in, gutted and fried.

    Reply
  6. Gezza

     /  11th May 2016

    I expect he’d classify “drop dead, loser” as a death threat.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  11th May 2016

      (laughs loudly at this witticism)

      Probably ! Try it and see.

      Reply
  7. I don’t believe that there are many people who are beyond redemption, but there are those who have yet to learn what their tragic personality flaw is. We all read about the repeat offenders who maim and kill other people in prisons, spend half their lives in prison and then get out on parole and repeat the offence. I reckon Cam Slater has not yet come to his catharsis of faith but he will. He thankfully is a family man with a supportive wife so he must have something going for him. Real men understand that there is no need to be physically assertive and those who are well mannered and considerate of others always will have far happier lives, and that is what really matters in life. As I recall, jealousy of others success turns one Green with envy. Think about it in relation to the campaign against Overseas Trusts, and those who are slinging the brown stuff around, and then ask why, what is their motive? I know what I think is their motive, and it is entirely negative, and there is no happiness there.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  11th May 2016

      Nice comment, BJ. Wrt Cameron, until he gets disillusioned with the company he keeps I don’t think he can change. Kindness is everything and you can’t keep it locked in a box labelled “Home”.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  11th May 2016

        I would NOT regard the sledgehammer remark as a death threat. It’s probable that many of us have made such a remark and never thought of it as a ‘death threat’. Had the person said that they were going to lie in wait for him and kill him by bashing him to death with a sledgehammer, that would be a very different matter. The use of sledgehammer shows that it’s a bit of hyperbole, surely. It’s like saying that you’ll offer someone a cyanide cocktail.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  11th May 2016

          I turned down a sayonara cocktail once when my ears were blocked due to a cold – just in case the offerer wanted me dead for some reason I couldn’t immediately fathom. 😎

          I was away busy for a few hours last night Kitty, Do you still want to know how to do the heart emoticon?

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  11th May 2016

            I saw it, thank you ❤

            If someone said that they'd like to brain him with a brick,or told him to take a long walk off a short pier or said 'There's a bus leaving in a few minutes-be under it.' he'd probably see those old chestnuts as death threats too. No wonder the judge isn't taking the 'death threats' seriously. CS is making himself look ridiculous by claiming that the tagging with a sledgehammer was one when it's 99.99999999999999999% likely to have been a throwaway remark.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  11th May 2016

              If someone meant to do it, they’d surely not announce it on Facebook.

      • Pete Kane

         /  11th May 2016

        Second Alan’s comment re BJ’s very wise and thoughtful observation.

        Reply
  8. duperez

     /  11th May 2016

    The judge not taking the “death threats” seriously surely can’t be the same judge who took Slater’s remorse seriously.

    Reply

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