Speaking out on family violence

Continuing on their series today NZ Herald quotes a number of people including Police Commissioner Mike Bush, Police Minister Judith Collins, Andrew Little plus a few actors.

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Family violence: New Zealanders speak out

New Zealand has the worst rate of family and intimate-partner violence in the world. Eighty per cent of incidents go unreported — so what we know of family violence in our community is barely the tip of the iceberg.

Today is the final day of We’re Better Than This, a week-long series on family violence.

Our aim is to raise awareness, to educate, to give an insight into the victims and perpetrators. We want to encourage victims to have the strength to speak out, and abusers the courage to change their behaviour.

Take a stand – NZ is #BetterThanThis

So here’s a prompt for Your NZers to speak out.

Leave a comment

6 Comments

  1. Pickled Possum

     /  14th May 2016

    More Men and Women Anger management groups please … help Shine the way for many a lost young man, who maybe gets their buttons pushed by an even more lost young lady.
    2 Sides to every coin.

    Reply
  2. Hall

     /  14th May 2016

    I don’t think we have the worst rate in the world not even close it’s just we can be bothered spending money on statistics, policing domestic violence, help lines and halfway houses. There are many countries around the world who don’t have any of these social services so they don’t keep statistics on domestic violence. NZ having the highest domestic violence rate in the world is misleading to say the least.

    Reply
  3. patupaiarehe

     /  14th May 2016

    So the annual week of hand wringing, manipulated statistics, and talk of how all kiwi men should be ashamed of themselves is finally over. Thank Christ!
    There is no point in even having a discussion if the terms of it are dictated, and anyone who departs from those terms is shouted down, and accused of ‘victim blaming’.
    This is the most sensible piece on the subject I have seen all week:
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/family-violence/news/article.cfm?c_id=178&objectid=11638745

    Family violence is not just a male problem. If we as a nation are really serious about reducing family violence, we need to talk about family violence in all its forms and all its causes . The last time I spoke up about this issue was in 2011 and the political response and condemnation was swift.

    Reply
    • Hall

       /  14th May 2016

      So true… instead of calling it domestic violence week they should of called it feminist hating on men week, that would have been more accurate. These idiots saying that domestic violence is a mens issue so there for men should be the ones to sort it out is both sexist and factually wrong. You don’t have domestic violence without woman so it takes both to fix the problem. It all stems from Anger you need to look at what causes anger and teach woman and me how to deal with anger.

      Reply
    • patupaiarehe

       /  15th May 2016

      To be fair, they are half right. The physical violence is just the obvious symptom of a problem that runs a lot deeper. This song came on ‘autoplay’ earlier tonight, and I ‘heard’ it a bit better than I had before….
      http://www.metrolyrics.com/creep-lyrics-stone-temple-pilots.html

      Reply
  4. Kitty Catkin

     /  14th May 2016

    Other countries also claim the worst in the world stats. I am not belittling the issue, but this seems to be a lot of sloppy thinking. The 80% doesn’t add up, it would mean that almost every household in NZ was like it.

    It’s alarming that now one can literally get away with murder-claim that the partner was violent and kill them in their sleep. I would want some evidence that the partner had been, or it’s going to be open season. Look at the woman in the US who drove a car into her ex-husband’s house and later killed him and, I think, his new wife. There have been some very dodgy cases there as, by definition, the dead person can’t refute the claims.

    In NZ there are refuges, so that unless someone’s locked up they can seek help.

    Reply

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