Story on the death of Moko

Story on Newshub devoted their whole programme last night to the death of Moko Rangitoheriri.

You may have heard the name Moko Rangitoheriri.

You may have heard about his brutal death.

Three-year-old Moko was so horrifically abused, tortured and beaten to death over days and weeks that his mother did not recognised him in the morgue when she had to identify him.

The coroner Wallace Bain says it’s likely to be worse than what happened to Nia Glassie who was murdered eight years ago.

This story is confronting and harrowing but one that must be told.

Young Moko was under the care of early childhood teacher Tania Shailer and David Haerewa who have pleaded guilty to his manslaughter after murder charges were dropped.

The couple was looking after Moko and his sister while their mother cared for her other son in Starship Hospital in Auckland.

Moko’s mother, Nicola Dally-Paki first heard of the harrowing details of Moko’s prolonged death from her daughter who was just seven years old at the time.

Ms Dally-Paki is speaking out publicly for the first time to get justice for Moko and because she wants her other children back from Child Youth and Family’s care.

She sat down with Story to talk about exactly what happened.

Video: Moko’s mum on her search for justice

Warning: This story contains graphic details which some may find distressing.

Also:

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50 Comments

  1. Brown

     /  17th May 2016

    One look mum’s face in the shorts was enough to answer all my queries. No need to watch after that.

    Reply
    • Nelly Smickers

       /  17th May 2016

      I watched the entire show last night while I was doing the dishes.

      When the mother came on with her story, for some strange reason, I found it very hard to be in any way moved by her plight. At the end of the program, the word ‘primitive’ came to mind.

      Even the water in the sink had gone cold :/

      Reply
      • “Primitive”? That sounds a bit racist.
        As for the tattoos, when she explained what they meant I could see many a grieving parent getting the same.

        What’s truly ‘primitive’ is your lack of empathy.

        Reply
    • Gezza

       /  17th May 2016

      So, Brown, you don’t therefore know when & why she got those tatoos on her face, or what they represent. You didn’t even give her any kind of hearing at all. Jesus will be having a word with you when your time comes. He won’t be congratulating you on your Christianity.

      Reply
      • MaureenW

         /  17th May 2016

        Have to say Gezza, I thought the same thing, then, “checked myself”, stupid tatts on the face are not sufficient evidence of a useless mother. Then, I checked again, the mother doesn’t live with her children, they’re farmed out somewhere else and I thought yes, she is one of those typical, stupid breeders, not fit to be a parent. I agree with Iceberg, she should be in the dock with the other two.
        I have quite a bit of experience with “these types” of people, who have babies to various fathers, can’t be bothered caring for the children then farm them out to “anyone” else, doesn’t matter whether they’re fit for child-caring or not. This is an inter-generational issue that is perpetuated within families, because “most” (not all) of the whanau do this. It really is bizarre, the maori race who claim their mokopuna are of paramount value, then they pass the kids around like a “joint at a party”.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  17th May 2016

          I’m not the one constantly professing to be a good Christian Maureen. If Brown can’t find the relevant verses he should know about, I’ll be happy to post them.

          Reply
        • Wow you’re one of those special type of fuckwits aren’t you? She was caring for another child in a different city who was in hospital. She entrusted Moko to her “friend” who by the way was also an early childhood caregiver. The mother obviously was oblivious to the true nature of this “friend” and is now baring the brunt of this heinous crime which is completely unfair. Your Eurocentric view of the Maori family structure also leaves something to be desired. Maori are far more inclusive of grandparents, aunties, uncles, cousins and other extended family than their Pakeha counterparts, which is why you can have huge extended Maori families that all know one another which is a rarity where Pakeha are concerned. This problem isn’t to do with Maoridom at its root it is a socioeconomic issue.

          Reply
          • I’m just reading ur comments and i did the march moko and all the hurt wee souls.im really stunned and a tiny angry that he.got left with a women who knew a violent man? Simple,really.she made a really really bad judgement call why? I just don’t get it.i got abused in my marriage and i watched over my kids like they were gold<3 no.one but me cared for them.im thinking their may have been money involved for tania not to get help she's scum of the earth.shes a disgrace to carers around the world.never ever let her Evan have kids.

            Reply
      • MaureenW

         /  17th May 2016

        I know of one family where Nana is looking after ten (10) grandchildren whose parents aren’t fit to do so. 6 children under the age of seven years, from her 40-something year old son and partner – both on P’ and another 4 children between 8 – 16 from her 30-something daughter and husband – both on P.

        The Nana had 3 children to 3 different fathers, and farmed their care out to her mother (no drugs involved fortunately), however those children (now adults) are all emotionally damaged i.e. they were feed and clothed but not provided essential life skills.

        The only upside to this story, is that Nana, is doing a great job with her grandchildren, pity she didn’t do the same with her own children and maybe she wouldn’t have the problem she has today.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  17th May 2016

          These families are by no means all Maori. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren was on television some years ago, and all were Pakeha.

          I couldn’t believe it that the advice is given to leave the parents one child to keep their income going.

          Reply
          • MaureenW

             /  17th May 2016

            I remember seeing the program you were referring to,.

            Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  17th May 2016

        I agree, Gezza. There are, alas, many ‘Christians’ who don’t feel the need to match their supposed beliefs with their actions, unlike someone I know who doesn’t make a great parade of her beliefs but who is so pro-life that there’s always room for one more baby in her house. I don’t think that I have ever seen her in town without at least one. Her faith shines from her in her lifestyle. . There are many like her, but also far too many whited sepulchres.

        Judgementalism isn’t a good look from anyone whose religion’s founder said ‘Judge not, that ye be not judged.’ among other such things. ‘He who is without sin among you, let him cast the first stone.’ ‘Why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye ?’

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  17th May 2016

          Well, as you know Kitty, I’m not normally one to criticise, but I have to agree with you there.

          Reply
  2. Iceberg

     /  17th May 2016

    “But Child, Youth and Family has their doubts.

    They sent Story a statement saying they “do not believe it is in the best interests of her other children to be living with Nicola at this time because we do not have the confidence she will keep them safe”.

    That’s a damning indictment of the mother. She should be in the dock with the other two. This story will be the same, and as predictable, as all the others. Kids born into welfare, different father’s, no one cares, beaten to death.

    Reply
  3. Corky

     /  17th May 2016

    Really nothing to report here. Usual suspects, usual environment, usual hand-wringing and usual death.

    I have a confession to make, I knew David Haerewa when he was younger. He came from a fractured family, with his siblings raised by various family members. Mongrel mob associations, plenty of violence and booze where the hallmark of many family members. To be fair some have now sorted their life out.

    David is a ” what could have been” case. Left to his own devices he became aimless and committed petty crime( nothing violent). When Winz put him on different courses he became a changed person- he connected and enjoyed the lifestyle.. However, once the course finished he became aimless when structure was removed from his life. I always knew David wouldn’t make it, although the last time I heard about him he was in the army. That made me happy, I thought I was wrong, and Dave had pulled through. Sadly, for Moko, that wasn’t the case. My guess is he became a P jockey. I have to believe that otherwise I will lose trust in humanity.

    Reply
    • Klik Bate

       /  17th May 2016

      Maybe this makes it all a little easier to understand….it’s obviously genetic 😎

      http://i.stuff.co.nz/national/faces-of-innocents/79697706/men-behind-child-killings-related

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  17th May 2016

        Wish I could believe that, Klik. But I don’t. Evil comes from the soul, not the body.

        Reply
    • Corky: Child abuse seems to be a problem in middle North Island, Rotorua, Palmerston North, Taupo, Hawkes Bay and Bay of Plenty. Probably everywhere else to be honest too.

      That is so sad:((( David was nearly on the right track. But he had already been in prison?? I think that the Corrections department or another department needs to be following up on ex-prisoners every 6 months to check they are busy with a job and not on P or other drugs. They need to get regular blood tests to prove this. Otherwise what is the point of letting them out of prison? Maybe they could live somewhere in between prison and the outside world and have a normal job but be taken back to the premises each night. But definitely not living anywhere near children!!!!

      Surely Tania and David’s neighbours heard something? I would like to hear from them.

      Reply
  4. It’s also in the Daily Mail. Not surprising that this story would spread worldwide. the depth of perversion in this story is horrifying – making Moko’s sibling complicit in his torture was an extra touch of depravity that defies universal concepts of duty of care.

    Let’s do something about this people. Let’s say it how it is for starters. We’re murdering our babies and there is an overreepresented demographic who perpetrate the abuse, torture and often murder. In nearly all cases the family background and structure are dysfunctional and fractured. The natural father isn’t a constant caregiver and often the child is in the care of extended family members or friends. The offenders are overwhelmingly Māori.

    There’s something very, very wrong with whanau dynamics in which a child’s wellbeing is not paramount. Had I been abusing my children, their father was there as a protector and vice versa. Were both of us seen to be struggling as parents, our siblings, parents and friends would have stepped in. In most families, if a situation got so out of control family management was impossible, Social Services would have been called — without a doubt.

    Getting specific. We need better targeted media. We need experts in schools. Even if the abused is pre-school, like Moko, they often have older siblings. We need a syllabus that addresses abuse across all curricula. Abuse in the home should be central to the bullying theme, let’s face it, it IS where it starts.

    Reply
    • Iceberg

       /  17th May 2016

      We’ve done all that, over and over and over. This time we’ll do it over again. We will have the same conversation in a month, a year.

      It will not change until kids aren’t born into welfare. Welfare is a safety net.

      Reply
      • We’re not cutting to the chase Ice. We are not running family violence awareness programs in schools, or giving kids safe path to report, We can tell them about sex and bullying at school, but they need awareness that family violnce is not normal and they need to feel safe they can tell. Would Moko’s big sister have told if the context to do so was there?

        But, saying that, you’re right on welfare. It horrifies me to hear ignorant people talking about poverty and violence correlations. I’ve seen people living on streets begging who treat their children with the utmost respct, love and dignity. Alcohol, drugs, illteracy, unemployment and welfare wastrels are in many, if not most of these dynamics.

        Reply
        • Iceberg

           /  17th May 2016

          “We are not running family violence awareness programs in schools, or giving kids safe path to report”

          Yes, we are. Teachers report evidence of abuse, CYF’s are all over the schools, Yr 8 girls learn self defence, it’s endless.

          Reply
          • I think Mindfulness programmes are needed quite urgently in schools for girls and boys. Some parents don’t know how to teach this. For boys its about acknowledging feelings and what to do with anger and who to talk to about feelings. They need positive male role models i.e more male teachers. If they learn thats its ok to have anger, sadness, etc and they learn to share these feelings and release these feelings at a young age then they can become responsible for themselves and aren’t blaming others. Then hopefully they will be strong and know their own mind and won’t join a gang, commit crimes, etc. The great thing is is that the stronger your mind the better you can cope with what life throws at you. They can pass it onto their family and friends and hopefully change a generation.

            Reply
  5. Brown

     /  17th May 2016

    My wife said the mum was pregnant again (I didn’t notice) but I hope not.

    Reply
  6. Alan Wilkinson

     /  17th May 2016

    See Alan Duff in the Herald. I have to say it is clearly not just a welfare problem. It is a Maori plus welfare problem.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  17th May 2016

      Alan Duff: Time to break silence on Maori violence
      http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11639811

      Reply
    • MaureenW

       /  17th May 2016

      Alan Duff is right, and we all know it. I do think that the concept of whangai probably worked out ok for some kids once upon a time, but the drugs and alcohol factor (which is now usually involved) has ruined that concept of providing temporary care for children while Mum / Dad improve their circumstances in readiness for their children’s return. Many use the idealism of Whangai as the excuse but it’s just a smoke-screen for the parents to take no responsibility for their children and do drugs.

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  17th May 2016

      Tell that to Liberal commmentators. Talking of them, where are they? They usually like climbing into Duff- calling him an Uncle Tom. Yeah, they haven’t got the guts to look him in the face and say: “you were right in many regards”

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  17th May 2016

        The people who use that expression have never read Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Uncle Tom didn’t hesitate to speak his mind when he felt that it was necessary. One of these was when he was told that he was going to be freed and was delighted-his master was a little taken aback at this and said that Tom had a good life with him so needn’t look so pleased at leaving it (words to that effect) Tom’s reply was that he’d rather have poor clothes, a poor house, poor everything and know that they were his than have the best of everything and know that it belonged to another man.

        Where the idea that Uncle Tom is servile comes from is a mystery-he most certainly isn’t.

        The whole book is an indictment of slavery, not a justification of it.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  17th May 2016

          Yes, you are right KC. I am speechless. I am schooled.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  17th May 2016

            It’s a great book. One young slave makes an invention-guess who gets the money for it ? When he escapes, he has some money on him which I hope was the ‘master’s’-he was owed it. Some women slaves were kept as breeding machines so that the children could be sold. She shows the decency and humanity of some slave owners-and many were decent and humane-but makes it clear that this doesn’t make it right.

            Reply
  7. Gezza

     /  17th May 2016

    Why they weren’t charged with murder – as they bloody well should have been …
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/80064776/final-charges-in-moko-rangitoheriris-death-should-have-been-murder-adern-says

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  17th May 2016

      Murder requires intent. Sufficiently advanced stupidity is indistinguishable from malevolence. I would hope they will be sentenced under the guidelines for murder anyway.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  17th May 2016

        That’s my hope as well Alan. It’s a shame the law doesn’t provide for the compulsory sterilisation Possum thinks should happen to them as well while inside.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  17th May 2016

          I am unimpressed with the fact that one was a child-care worker.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  17th May 2016

            If they’d murdered him outright, they’d have lost the fun of having a living victim to torment and abuse. Ergo, it was manslaughter, it has to have been. They would have wanted to keep him alive so that they could carry on the pastime of torturing the poor child as long as possible, not to mention the belly laughs to be had from torturing his sister by proxy and damaging her for life.

            Of course they didn’t mean to kill him and spoil the fun. They must have been as mad as wasps when he escaped them by dying.

            They WILL have a nice time in prison when the other prisoners know who they are.

            Reply
    • Conspiratoor

       /  17th May 2016

      Charging them with murder won’t bring moko back to life or prevent this happening again. Let’s start talking solutions instead of this endless hand wringing g

      Reply
    • There’s a specific legal difference between murder and manslaughter.

      The sentences will be interesting, there’s scope for similar sentences to murder as far up as a life sentence.

      Reply
  8. Kitty Catkin

     /  17th May 2016

    I would have to say that the mother’s appearance does her no favours. I bet that the tattoos are the names of her children-but tattooed faces do look bad. It’s a shame that such a pretty girl has disfigured herself in this way.

    Reply
    • Nelly Smickers

       /  17th May 2016

      I think some facial tatt’s can actually look *quite good* though……

      Reply
      • Klik Bate

         /  18th May 2016

        When my wife saw this, she said, “There’s something about a man in uniform” 😎

        Reply
  9. I grew up in the Far North in the 40’s and 50’s, and was exposed to Te Aupouri, Te Rawara and Ngati Kuri marae and iwi. I recall wanting to beat Ross and Bruce Gregory’s academic record at Kaitaia College. I missed out! Bruce went on to Graduate as a MD at Otago, and Bruce took over their father’s role as a kamautua from Pukepoto where he carries great Mana. Others I wento school with were Colonel Eru Manuera MC, a noted Maori leader in his own right. We had also many Maori models like Bishop Muru Walters, Danny Heke, etc etc. However after the mid-60s things changed up North with the urbanisation of Maori who went south looking for jobs in the big smoke, Auckland, because of the lack of job opportunities up North. You were either a farmer or you were out of there in the Army, or if your family could rovide, off to Training College or Nursing School. The protective cloak of iwi, whanau and rohe were lost to the Maori children who were still dealing with the residual suspicion of their customs and beliefs by the majority non-Maori Community. The support system broke down, and the combined effects of access to alcohol, drugs and freedom from iwi and Whanau supervision resulted in disaster for those who were individually unprepared for what happened as they tried to adjust. Meanwhile the Far North slowly started to degenerate. Native/Maori Affairs sponsored farms and houses started to degenerate, the provincial towns lost people, businesses closed down, and semi ghost towns started to appear. Northland paid the price for Auckland’s growth. Our political leadership failed to recognise or deal with the problem, and so did the Maori leadership in the North. This is not an excuse for what has happened, it is an explanation of the process which isolated individual Maori (and non-Maori) from the self-discipline and moral duties inherent in belonging to a rural community/iwi. We still need recognition by all that history has created the situation and we need sound leadership and determination to overcome the problem. We can NOT play the blame game, we have to fix the problem and this may require the community to become involved in what we have regarded as our private affairs. We need to identify the red flag behaviour and this means we should allow others to ask how things are at home, and poke their noses into our situation so as to demonstrate a concern for ones fellow human beings.

    Reply
    • Klik Bate

       /  18th May 2016

      Well said bj – big thumbs-up from this end. Go well

      Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  21st May 2016

      When I lived at Bland Bay the old people did all the work. The young people boozed and drugged themselves silly. The tribal leaders visited in flash cars and suits and sucked money for themselves out of the political system. The communal system is stuffed now if it ever worked which I doubt.

      Reply
  10. Mommamiro.

     /  20th May 2016

    I am horrified at the comments on this page. Judgemental bigoted and just down right nasty! You judged her on her looks and called a breeder who dumped her kids. Had you listened you would have heard how her tattoos were done after Mokos death….. Not the smartest decision but clearly one made out of absolute grief and absolute love for her kids. Had you bothered to listen she was caring for her other child in hospital not off making babies or partying. Had you bothered to look without judging you would have seen the absolute grief and pain this woman was going through. How she thought she had left her children in safe hands. I wonder do you even understand empathy? How would you feel if this was one of your own in a situation like this? …. Oh wait that’s right it wouldn’t because you are perfect ……. Ugliness comes from the inside….. I hope you sleep well at night and your God keeps you safe in his arms

    Reply
  11. Roger Woodgate

     /  23rd May 2016

    This case and many others like Blessie come under the heading of “Systemic failure” according to politicians and public servants. The way I understand it is that systems do not drop out of the sky. They are made by people and run by people. Those people are responsible for the atrocities commited by those that the system should lock up in some institution for life. They are dangerous and if there is nowhere to put them them, kill them on their first such offence.

    Reply
  12. Ashamed to be a Kiwi, 1) because of how bad our child abuse is, 2) because of comments like these that show how bad racism, discrimination and ignorance is in NZ. Fact: we will never solve these issues if we continue to act without compassion. You are no better than the abusers if you spit racism and take a euro-centric view of everything when things are clearly more complicated. In fact, you are only adding to the aggression.

    Reply

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