Ardern: absolutely no to leadership

For the record Jacinda Ardern has categorically ruled out any aspirations for a leadership role in Labour. Ever. She says that the job looks too tough, too hard.

She rang Tim Fookes on Newstalk ZB this morning to challenge some comments regarding the Labour-Green memorandum – Jacinda Ardern: Defending the Green Alliance.

Fookes asked Ardern about any leadership ambitions she might have.

Fookes: There was an article written by Duncan Garner over the weekend…raising yourself as a possible Labour leader because of the need for Labour to have leaders based out of Auckland.

Have you been approached about this, and is the leadership at some stage something you are looking for?

Ardern: No.

Fookes: Ever?

Ardern: No.

Fookes: So you never want to be Labour party leader?

Ardern: I’ve always been really clear on this. First and foremost there is no question around our leadership in the Labour Party. Absolutely united behind Andrew Little. Secondly…

Fookes: Even though he’s only polling eight or nine?

Ardern: Secondly would I ever consider leadership? I’ve been really clear it’s not my ambition. So there’s no point having any speculation…

Fookes: So, we might save this interview and if it ever comes up maybe in five or ten years…

Ardern: Feel free, feel free.

Fookes: You can categorically say you never want to be Labour Party leader?

Ardern: I can categorically say that, and I always have, this is not new information.

It’s such a, I think politics is probably a place where people make a lot of assumptions about there being lots of ego in it. I guess you know that’s probably a fair assumption, that we make a bit of a guess that everyone who’s involved must want to be the top dog.

But that’s just not the case. There are plenty of us who’ve got into politics and who work in politics…because they want to make a contribution and they don’t see themselves in one of those roles, and that’s me.

I want to be a Minister, and that’s what my goal is, to get Labour into Government. That’s the place I feel I can do all of the things I want to achieve.

Fookes: Can I say to you that by saying no you don’t want to ever be Labour I think is a crying shame, ah because I think someone like you would be someone that would attract votes to the Labour Party.

I think that if Labour is to become, you know to get somewhere back up around those high thirties and early forties, and really on a level playing field with National, someone like you could actually do that job for them.

Ardern: I believe we can absolutely, we can absolutely do it, I do. And whilst that’s, you know very flattering you would take that view but perhaps those who want it the least are probably the sanest.

And I say that because it is such a hard job. I’ve watched from Helen Clark in the leadership role, I’ve had admiration for every single one of our leaders because it’s a really tough job, maybe even harder when you’re in opposition.

So huge admiration but I’ve just also learnt that it’s not a job I would ever want.

Leave a comment

34 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  1st June 2016

    Is Fookes on the make?

    Reply
    • He sounded a bit gushy for a bit.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  1st June 2016

        I” go have a listen Pete. Just from reading what you wrote, he sounded like he was single & desperate.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  1st June 2016

          Wow! Had a listen. She’s a trooper isn’t she? Holding the party line and backing the wimp to lead them into the Treasury Benches. She mounted as good a justification, explanation & defence of the LAG MoU as anybody has yet, maybe the best I’ve heard. Certainly articulate, intelligent, pleasant & has a sense of humour. Hope she survives the crash or joins any new party that might arise from the ashes post the 2017 election.

          Fookes didn’t seem too bad. Asked some good questions, didn’t try to dominate his caller or overly-insert any obvious political bias. Haven’t listened to him before. Anybody know much about him – righty, lefty, neutral?

          Reply
          • Brown

             /  1st June 2016

            He’s youngish, tall as, recently married and I suspect would not be tempted by Ardern. From what I hear I think he’s right of what passes for the center nowadays. I also like that he has manners although I think he will get sharper with age and that may make him harder on politicians as he matures into the role.

            I wonder if Ardern’s not inclined to be tempted by leadership because she knows she’s as shallow as a puddle and couldn’t cope. Much easier to collect the ordinary salary and pension without risk of failure.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  1st June 2016

              Aww Brown, my friend, not like you to be so ungenerous in spirit re someone like Jacinda. Sounded like a lovely ❤ girl.

              Thanks for background on Fookes though, handy to know.

    • Blazer

       /  3rd June 2016

      For Fookes sake ,have you seen her ankles!

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  3rd June 2016

        No I haven’t been reading Woman’s Day lately e hoa. What’s wrong with her ankles?

        Tbh she’s a bit too angular for my taste & not quite as well stacked as a couple of others. Plus her teeth. Sounds pleasant & genuine enough though. I’m not so shallow as to base my vote just on someone’s looks though, Blazer.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  3rd June 2016

          hee haw…e hoa!

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  3rd June 2016

            Don’t let Kitty know we’ve had this convo eh?
            She ripped strips off Iceberg last night for calling intialisms acroynms & packed him off whimpering.
            She’d wouldn’t like us discussing this at all I don’t think. Good to see you’re back & getting stuck in mate.

            Reply
  2. So thats a Yes then : ) and I am only half joking….. did he ask the real question “if your colleagues insisted and the party really need you to be leader, would you accept the role?”

    Because we all know that is the correct phrasing and allows all that faux modesty to be displayed.

    However – if she is genuine then good on her knowing her capability and where she can contribute the most

    Reply
    • To me she sounds genuine about it. For now – things can change over time, especially if MPs become senior (experience and age wise).

      And it’s credible to an extent, I’m not a leadership sort of person so understand that.

      But she does seem happy to seek attention and media coverage to build her profile.

      Perhaps she’s a good example of the new breed of career politicians.

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  1st June 2016

        She is obviously aware of her limitations as a politician but where does that leave Labour? She would appear to be the only one likable enough to improve their vote.

        Reply
      • Brown

         /  1st June 2016

        Yep, smile and do nothing.

        Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  1st June 2016

        She’s also quite young, and possibly can’t even imagine being leader or even PM without terror at the thought. Even if she wanted to, it could well be a bad idea for someone so young to be party leader anyway, unless she’s older than I think.If she knows that she’s not leadership material, that shows wisdom and insight. I wonder what would happen if Sue Moroney was made leader.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  1st June 2016

          Nah, pretty sure she’d flag it Kitty. Doesn’t like flags.

          Reply
        • PDB

           /  1st June 2016

          Kitty: “If she knows that she’s not leadership material, that shows wisdom and insight”.

          Indeed. Being a young Labour MP why strive to become like Norman Kirk when instead you can become like Nanaia Mahuta.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  2nd June 2016

            That’s not what I meant, Pants. Being a party leader means endless stress and terrible hours. If someone knows that it’s not for them, and that, at the moment, anyway, they wouldn’t be able to do it, then I admire them for saying so. Any MP will know what it’s like for the party leader. If they then say that they couldn’t or wouldn’t do it, then they are being honest and show self-knowledge-especially if people are saying that they SHOULD go for it. One doesn’t have to be either the leader or a plodder, it’s not as if those are the only two options !

            Reply
  3. spanish_tudor

     /  1st June 2016

    I think she’ll eventually become Labour leader much the same way as Bill Rowling or Geoffrey Palmer – doesn’t want the leadership, won’t seek the leadership, but will serve if pressed to do so.

    Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  2nd June 2016

    This Tim Fookes chap on Newstalk ZB is quite good I reckon PG. I was father-in-law-sitting this morning & he always listens to the talkback on this station. One of the topics this morning was paywave being put on everyones’ bank cards whether they want it or not, and how insecure it is.

    If you lose your card & crims or dishonest finders can run around whacking up huge debts of $80 at a time all over town apparently, and they’re vulnerable to people carrying readers and getting the codes or however they work so they can rip off your account as well. One woman said she was next in line at a checkout recently, and when the woman in front went to pay for her groceries it wouldn’t accept her card because it had already been paid, by the card of the woman behind her.

    People who don’t want paywave for these reasons have been ringing up their banks and asking for paywave to be taken off their cards, only to be told that it can’t be done, the cards are all sent from America or something and there’s nothing they can do about it. Which is odd, because a couple of people rang in and said they’d phoned up the ASB bank & ASB happily cancelled the paywave facility on-screen as they spoke. I must pay close attention to my next statements, I’ve got a bit lazy about that lately.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  2nd June 2016

      If my groceries had been paid for, then that’s not a rip-off, surely. The woman must have this wrong.

      You, Alan and I are in the checkout queue.I’m in front.Alan’s behind me and you’re behind him.

      I go to pay for my groceries, but can’t because your card has paid for them. How can this happen ? You’d need to be near the checkout and have your card close enough to work. In this case, the person paying is two behind the person whose groceries were paid for-Alan’s next and you’re behind him. . How has your card paid for my groceries from that distance? How would they know whose card it was ? It wouldn’t come up as Gezza Smith, only as ANZ123456789, wouldn’t it ? I haven’t been a rip-off victim, I have a cartload of free groceries.

      The ‘readers’ would have to be quite close, or so I hear. I must look this up.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  2nd June 2016

        Be good if you could back to us on this ta Kitters.

        i don’t really mind letting Al go ahead of me. He’s a busy man & he’s always got more bureaucrats waiting to be hung on his fence. But why do you always have to be in front? :/

        Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  2nd June 2016

        6 inches. There is no way that this story can be true; the person whose groceries were paid for would have to have ‘read’ the card of the person two behind her, nipped out of the shop, processed it on a machine and (I think) printed off a fake card-and then somehow been back in the same queue. And then been fool enough to broadcast whose card it was.

        I believe that ANZ remove the wave thing.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  2nd June 2016

          I’m in front because I’m a lady and Alan is a gentleman who lets ladies go first.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  2nd June 2016

            It’d take him 30 minutes to get his groceries though down here during school hours then.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  2nd June 2016

              (Be a dear, chuck a “r” in that “though” for me, would you hon?)

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  2nd June 2016

              Catch….r coming through.

              Doesn’t this story sound like an urban myth ? I wish that the person two behind me would do this for me. Sigh,

            • Gezza

               /  2nd June 2016

              Well, if it is an urban myth it was certainly cranking up the calls from those who don’t want paywave & haven’t been given any choice.

        • Gezza

           /  2nd June 2016

          One other caller I think rang in & said, or maybe Tim said he’d heard, that a solution would be to damage the chip, but I though nah, I’m not taking a hammer to mine in case it doesn’t work for anything after that and I have to explain to the bank why I need a replacement.

          Another caller said you can get metal-lined wallets now to prevent readers getting your details, and that she had one.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  2nd June 2016

            + “t”.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  2nd June 2016

              I won’t be-I can’t believe that I’d fail to notice someone holding a reader that close, and as my wallet is always at the front of my bag they’d have to be very close to me. The metal-lined wallets seem an unnecessary expense for something so unlikely to happen. The bank would pay back money stolen in this way, anyway,

              Most people would notice someone standing 6″ away from them with an electronic device being run over them like a mini Geiger counter, surely ! Because my old man lost several wallets & sets of keys (he was very careless in that way ), I bought him one of those little bags with the long straps. No more lost keys and wallets. They’re brilliant, everyone should have one. The mobile and everything goes in.

            • Gezza

               /  2nd June 2016

              The bank would pay back money stolen in this way, anyway,
              You might have to prove it wasn’t you first though, depending on the purchases? I mean, even it was a cheap Chinese-made angle grinder, for example, Penny Bright’s possibly got one of those. Certainly knows how to use one.

              No … these readers can be comfortably stuck in your pocket, I gather. I’d maybe get one of those long-strap bags you’re recommending except I think the lads in the pub would mock me K. It’s was bad enough the day I wore chapstick.

  5. Kitty Catkin

     /  2nd June 2016

    ANZ said that the number was actually tiny (crimes done with the wavy cards) It’s possible to request waveless cards in the first place.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  2nd June 2016

      I meant to say that the supermarket story was an urban myth, not contactless card crime-but banks said that that sort of crime (card) had remained more or less at the same level for years, anyway.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s