“Their Hysterical Reaction Tells Us…”

Martyn Bradbury on Brexit an enormous threat to global economy:

I don’t think most people understand just how much danger the global economy is now in…

The initial shockwave…

We have an undeclared currency war erupting…a global economy already on its knees.

Brexit is a terminal blow.

I didn’t think the British would leave the EU because I didn’t think they were so masochistic, but the inability of the political elites and corporations that have benefited from globalisation to understand the anger of working classes being hurt by the extra competition has seen the great dream of a unified Europe end.

Let’s be clear – this is a shocking result because it turns everything on its head.

The irony of the British wishing to escape the parts of globalisation they didn’t like could in turn create a global economic collapse that a burns them as badly as it burns everyone else.

Brexit‬ is a result of the working classes being hurt by globalisation…

I suspect there is more in it and many more reasons for why people voted the way they did than “the working classes being hurt by globalisation”.

Some like Bradbury are claiming it proves their pet theory.

Bryan Gould writes: Their Hysterical Reaction Tells Us Why The Remainers Lost

It’s a bit more complex than that too.

Among the many hysterical reactions to the Brexit decision, a particular post on Facebook caught my attention.  The author was convinced that the decision to leave was the equivalent of the Visigoths’ sacking of Rome; civilisation itself was apparently in its last days.

It did not seem to occur to him that the decision to leave the EU was the product of a vote in which a majority of his fellow-citizens had simply, as part of their democratic right, acted on a view, or views, on a subject of interest to the whole community, that were just as valid as, but different from, his own. 

The barbarians whom he castigated were not invaders from elsewhere; they were Britons like him, enjoying the same right as he had to consider the issues and express a view.   It is what is called democracy.

The fury and hatred aroused by the discovery that there was actually a majority that disagreed with those who thought that they alone were capable of reaching the right and proper decision – and the vitriol with which those sentiments are expressed – provides us with an insight into the mentality of many of those who simply could not believe that any view other than theirs was possible.

For them, whether to remain or leave had ceased to be a practical issue to be calmly and rationally assessed.  It had passed beyond the bounds of rationality and was approached with all the zealotry of the religious fanatic. “Europe” had become a symbol of who they were or wished to be – making common cause with all those of similar sensibilities across the continent.

It is becoming clear that many Labour voters – almost certainly a majority – voted to leave.  It is true that Corbyn, partly perhaps because his heart wasn’t in it and partly in an attempt to placate his critics, found himself caught in a sort of no-man’s land. 

As a consequence, the Labour leadership missed the chance to place itself at the head of that majority who were fed up with the obvious, serious and growing deficiencies of the EU as a model for European integration.

That’s a different reason altogether to Bradbury’s “working classes being hurt by globalisation”.

Among the many insights the Brexit decision provides is a spotlight on how far detached most of Labour’s parliamentary leaders are from the voters they claim as their own.

It’s not just Labour’s parliamentarians who are detached. I have no idea what attachment Bradbury has to the working classes.

 

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14 Comments

  1. @DavidCunliffeMP
    Pub quote of the day : “the elites are worried about Brexit; ordinary people are worried about breakfast”.

    Reply
  2. Strong For Life

     /  26th June 2016

    Bradbury wrong again… that’s no surprise. Anything Bomber predicts or supports the opposite happens.

    Reply
  3. Missy

     /  26th June 2016

    I posted this link last night, but here it is again. The reasons why people voted as they did.

    http://lordashcroftpolls.com/2016/06/how-the-united-kingdom-voted-and-why/

    I do find it funny that the Remainers are convinced it was all Farage’s doing, and people were stupid and believed his ‘lies’ – the latest being that the 350million will go to the NHS, where most Leavers ignored Farage’s utterings and made up their own mind, yet evidence suggests many believed the armageddon predictions of the Remain camp.

    The problem appears to me to be that many of the younger voters (18-24) didn’t understand the concept of the referendum, they seemed to think that the Leavers had to have policy statements and that anything they said i.e.: the money that goes to Brussels could be spent on services back home such as the NHS, were election promises. There is also a lot of talk saying ‘the Leavers have no plan’ – which of course is ridiculous, they gave concept statements, but they aren’t the one’s that need to have the plan to leave, that is the job of the Government. There were also some Remainers that seemed to think if Brexit won Farage would be PM – or in Government at least, and he isn’t even an MP!

    The hysterical nature of the campaigning, the armageddon scenarios put forward by the Remain campaign are, in part, to blame for this hysterical reaction by the Remainers. Many truly do believe the world will end.

    Reply
  4. Iceberg

     /  26th June 2016

    “I have no idea what attachment Bradbury has to the working classes”

    None, apart from bludging off the unions. There hasn’t been a large disaffected working class for decades, so he has to keep pimping new victims of (insert faux bad guy) to stay “relevant”.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  26th June 2016

      Waatea 5th Estate still better to listen to than Q&A & some of The Nation’s though. Now they have to set up The Nation set with easy access to fire a hose in case things ever get that out of hand again.

      Bomba’s a nonce not having some righties on from time to time. He’s not watchable but listening is ok & some of his questions are great ones. The lack of opportunity to hear answers from the other side insults the intelligence of his listeners & some of his better guests.

      Reply
      • “some of his questions are great ones.”

        Yes, when he asks questions rather than making biased political statements.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  26th June 2016

          His biased political statements are great! Pure comedy. They do no harm at all PG IMO.

          If he didn’t make them I’m not sure I would listen to the show. It’s part of the attraction for me.

          Reply
    • Blazer

       /  26th June 2016

      stop talking b/s…ever heard of minimum living wage!

      Reply
      • Blazer, 25% of taxpayers are paying for a minimum wage for 50% of New Zealanders already? How much is enough? Where does it stop? How many front and backyards are planted in fruit trees and vegetables like during War years and the Depression?

        Reply
        • Beejay – To my mind the question becomes: What kind of system has resulted in the apparent necessity for 50% or more of NZ wage-earners to have their wages subsidized by the State? It’s not Russian or Chinese Socialism that has created this. It’s neoliberal economic ‘reform’ of the Rogernomics kind … globalisation, competition, productivity and efficiency … the curtailing of unionism … and all the rest … the curtailing of self-sufficiency like fruit trees and vege gardens in favour of supermarket consumerism …

          Reply
          • Joe Bloggs

             /  27th June 2016

            Nailed it again PZ…the 99% paying the price for the 1% to get rich

            Reply
  5. Bomber he of the Kim Dotcom and Mana is a game changer…. the oracle for an ipad…. hahahahaha.

    If that plonker is proclaiming the end then I am 99.99999999999999999% everything will be fine when the UK state separates from the EU

    Reply

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