Peeping drones

Using drones to peep and spy is disturbing by not really surprising.

Stuff: Peeping incidents among drone-related complaints made to Civil Aviation Authority

Peeping and peering incidents involving drones figure numerous times in information on drone-related incidents released by the Civil Aviation Authority under the Official Information Act 

The incidents feature the machines, which can carry cameras, hovering outside homes at night, and sometimes targeting several neighbouring properties in succession. 

In a typical incident from the CAA report, a Christchurch resident reported a drone flying close to their window one night last May.

“Complainant closed curtains and soon afterwards the [drone] moved to the neighbouring property,” the file notes.

A Petone, Lower Hutt resident complained in April this year about a drone appearing at night over homes and “hovering around windows of houses at close proximity”.

Another, in Auckland in December, also had a drone over their property.

“I noticed it then go and hover over at least three of our neighbours’ properties.”

There could be a variety of reasons for using drones like this. Peeping is an obvious one, but they could also be used to ‘case joints’ to aid burglars. And malicious intent like harassment is another possibility.

CAA has released rules for drones, acknowledging: “Aviation regulators around the world are grappling with how to integrate [drones] into existing aviation safety systems”.

Those rules include provisions not to fly at night, to get consent from anyone you want to fly above, and to get permission before flying over properties.

But Wellington barrister Stephen Iorns said there were currently very few criminal charges that could be laid if someone broke the authority’s rules. 

“It’s only a criminal offence under the Crimes Act if someone is naked or engaged in intimate behaviour,” he said.

So if you want to be protected from drones by current laws turn up the heat and go naked indoors.

“The Privacy Commissioner can’t investigate without [someone] identifying who the party who did the filming is.” 

And the Privacy Commission did not have the power to issue fines.

Instead, victims would have to go through the Human Rights Tribunal for that, but only once they had a favourable ruling from the Privacy Commission.

Identification will be a real problem.

Is it legal to use drone Stingers?

 

Leave a comment

22 Comments

  1. Brown

     /  27th June 2016

    Anti aircraft artillery coming to a home near you. Bugger the legality.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  27th June 2016

      Farmers & duckshooters have a ready-made solution. Pity there’s not a way to fit a silencer to a shotgun for use in the ‘burbs.

      Reply
        • Gezza

           /  27th June 2016

          Brilliant!! XD Big ups to any other kiwi lads with similar balls. 😎

          Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  27th June 2016

          I think the home-made bows and arrows we used to make out of our bamboo patch would do the job. Just put a bit of trailing twine on the arrow and fire it through the blades. We used to split the end of the bamboo and bind a cardboard feather into it. Worked like a charm. The ladies in the croquet green over the back fence didn’t like them though.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  27th June 2016

          We made those! Used to use freshly cut supplejack as well for the bows. (Until I planed & made a proper one in woodwork class that fired bought arrows after the woodwork teacher had a breakdown and we were allowed to make what we liked for the rest of the term.)

          We used to split and bind in a small nail in the front end of the bamboo arrows, and added plasticine to it instead of trying to fletch them. Worked pretty well.

          Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  27th June 2016

      Brown, these are drones, not artillery. We are not at war and nobody who is unauthorised to have such things is remotely likely to be able to buy one. Drones are seriously annoying, but not likely to kill anyone.

      Alan and Gezza; when I was a child, we had an Indian friend. My brother was old enough to know about cowboys and Indians, but not that this young man was from India or that the cowboys and Indians era was long gone. J was kind enough to not spoil his belief that he was lucky enough to know a real Indian of the cowboy & Indian type, told him stories about how he used to fight the cowboys and-oh, bliss-gave him a bow and arrows and told him it was the one he’d used to kill cowboys with. I don’t know when it dawned on my brother that J was not that kind of Indian, we moved to another town after a while, but what a wonderful thing to do-not only not disillusion a little boy but tell him these thrilling stories and let him live the dream of actually KNOWING an Indian.

      Reply
  2. Nelly Smickers

     /  27th June 2016

    I bet Bill still prefers the old days 😎

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  27th June 2016

      Good call. He is a drone too. You’re right again, Nellers. On a roll. 😎

      Reply
    • Brown

       /  27th June 2016

      The lady in the foreground is faking – she has no idea how to use a sledge hammer. I suspect the lady in the background is faking as well.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  27th June 2016

        Yep, the arms don’t hang straight down to the weights – they are fake too.

        Reply
      • Gezza

         /  27th June 2016

        Front end of background lady looks fake. Back end looks original.

        Reply
        • lurcher1948

           /  27th June 2016

          WHO CARES she could bring breakfast in bed to me ANY DAY

          Reply
        • Blazer

           /  27th June 2016

          I dare say the Bristol cities on display are fake…too.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  27th June 2016

            Absolutely. Everything else is moving.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  27th June 2016

              I wish that there was some way of making these really irritating loop videos at least stay still as there’s no way of deleting them.

              I thought that you and your wife were a great team, Lurch.

  3. Gezza

     /  27th June 2016

    Is it legal to use drone Stingers?
    Yes. They’re called other drones.

    Reply
  4. Time for the Red Baron to take to the sky again, using either slug gun or trailing twine?

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  27th June 2016

      I wondered about slug guns-or would spud guns do ? Slug guns might break someone’s window or injure them.

      If one knew whose it was, one could stand naked in front of it and then make a complaint about it being sent on a perving mission.

      Reply
  5. Kevin

     /  28th June 2016

    I own a drone and there a few things wrong with this story. Drones are loud so if someone tries to fly one outside your window you’ll hear it. Also, you’re not allowed to fly one within 30m of other people so there’s that. And it’s a young technology, their cameras aren’t all that good (great for aerial photography though) so good luck flying one into your neighbour’s 1) without getting caught and 2) not crashing the damn thing.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s