185 schools in ERO’s worst performing category

The state of many New Zealand schools is substandard and failing many students according to a report from the New Zealand Initiative.

Jo Moir at Stuff reports Student achievement is improving in New Zealand but internationally Kiwis are slipping – report

School quality reports from the Education Review Office (ERO) reveal as of June last year 185 schools were in ERO’s worst performing category.

Of those schools, one-third were “persistent” poor performers and some had repeatedly failed students for at least a decade – spanning the entire schooling career of their students, says the New Zealand Initiative report.

That kind of underperformance wouldn’t be tolerated in other sectors but is “accepted in education”.

Lack of education is a major factor in many negative social outcomes, including health, crime, unemployment, parenting.

Very high illiteracy of prisoners shows that those who fail in schools are more likely to fail in society.

ERO has recently changed its approach from “asking about general performance to asking how primary schools are making sure that every single student is achieving at the level they need to”.

Poor performance has led to the Ministry of Education taking over all or some functions of 67 school boards – 51 per cent of the students affected are from schools made up of the poorest families.

Every three years New Zealand students sit the OECD’s PISA exams testing thousands of 15-year-olds on maths, science, reading skills and knowledge.

New Zealand’s position dropped from 7th place in reading, 7th in science and 13th in maths in 2009 to 13th, 18th and 23rd respectively in 2012.

On the other hand just this month Education Minister Hekia Parata congratulated students and schools on the “best-ever results in NCEA” – roll-based pass rates in level 1, 2 and 3 have all improved.

Teaching is a very demanding occupation.

Ministry of Education deputy secretary Lisa Rodgers said schools are supported to “resolve issues themselves” unless help is needed and the ministry steps in.

Data shows teacher turnover is increasing, and it is greater in lower decile schools, but again it isn’t recorded why teachers leave the profession and where they go.

The Education Council is the professional body for teachers and its professional services manager Pauline Barnes says it “cares about when teachers leave and why”.

“We will read the report in detail and then look at how we can respond.”

The ministry couldn’t provide a response on where or why teachers go because they “do not collect the data on the reasons why people move”.

“Because we want the best teachers teaching our students we are concerned about supply and also quality,” Rodgers said.

If they don’t know why teachers leave it makes it difficult to know how to try and prevent more teachers leaving.

Schools report: could do better. Must do better. The future success and well being of hundreds of thousands of children are at stake.

 

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21 Comments

  1. Corky

     /  29th June 2016

    1- Marxist teacher unions
    2- Political correctness.
    3- High Polynesian rates of bullying .Both of teachers and pupils.
    4- Too much emphasis on culture, sports, and social issues at the cost of core skills that are transferable to real life
    5- Poor teacher college training. The first thing a teacher learns is the Treaty of Waitangi. Question that and the class is encouraged to question their fellow class members racist views. In other words brainwashing.
    6- Schools having to deal with social issues from the outside.
    7- NCEA is a joke with tertiary providers giving it away.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/leaguetables/10488555/OECD-education-report-subject-results-in-full.html

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  29th June 2016

      Damn. Your Mr Hyde is out again but I find it hard to argue with too much of that. PG is right – it’s ridiculous that they don’t know why teachers are leaving. They have to find out & fix this. I’m not sure it’s about Marxist teachers Corky, nor if the bullying is confined to Maori.

      Reply
  2. duperez

     /  29th June 2016

    Things are worse than stated by the newspaper reports.
    50% of schools actually, are below average. We need to sell schools and education off.
    Who is/are the New Zealand Initiative?

    Reply
  3. duperez

     /  29th June 2016

    And as an aside:

    “Lack of education is a major factor in many negative social outcomes, including health, crime, unemployment, parenting.
    Very high illiteracy of prisoners shows that those who fail in schools are more likely to fail in society.”

    All the reports over years say the same thing. We can keep repeating the stats about the “underachievers” at school and in society being the brown faced from lower socio-economic circumstances. We can keep chucking up Ministers of Education who say the answer to those in straitened circumstances is putting great teachers in front of kids.

    One day, probably the day before hell freezes over, we might have a Minister of Education who appreciates that sending sows’ ears into school factories and expecting them to come out as silk purses is a flawed strategy.

    For those with a notion of attacking that shocking analogy, consider directing any attack towards the strategy.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  29th June 2016

      That seems a long-winded skirting of the issue that some schools cope much better with their sow’s ears than others and it behoves us to learn why and make continuous improvements to benefit everyone.

      Reply
      • duperez

         /  29th June 2016

        It does indeed behove us to learn why and make continuous improvements to benefit everyone. We already know close to 100% arriving at some factory doors are sow’s ears while at others it is close to 0%. Naturally we should expect 100% silk purses everywhere and work as creatively as we can to achieve that target. Is the chief strategy of pillorying the factory hands the best way to achieve the targets?

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  29th June 2016

          Tosh. Comparisons and ratings by the ERO are on a like by like basis. The criticisms and judgements are not of the people but what they are doing – what works and what doesn’t.

          Reply
          • duperez

             /  29th June 2016

            Tosh. I think my observations are correct and the question fair. I did not say the ERO were pillorying the factory hands, that comes from all and sundry. Are the criticisms and judgements by ERO specific to what I said or to systems?

            And if ERO says it found “more than one third (65 out of 185 schools) of poor performers had failed to meet expectations for at least two consecutive reviews” is a school on that list because its Hazards Register was not up-to-date on one visit and on the next visit their Education Outside the Classroom was not current?

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  30th June 2016

              If you don’t know the answer to your question, you don’t have the evidence to support your assertions.

  4. Gezza

     /  29th June 2016

    How does selling it off help? On large scale, I mean.

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  29th June 2016

      Haven’t you heard, privatising makes everything competitive and that sees better results

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  29th June 2016

        Failed private schools close. Failed public ones don’t. Haven’t you heard?

        Reply
      • Gezza

         /  29th June 2016

        Yes I heard that. Privatising energy companies certainly made paying power bills easier for people who own energy companies, serco make Mt Eden run so well they’ve saved anyone else having to do the job, and Solid Energy’s private board and management are famously a howling success.

        Reply
  5. We’re being failed by teachers and schools, excuses for parents and governments who enable the lot of them. Bound to Unions that care more for pay scale and forced mediocrity teachers are still delivering us that 20% fail tail.

    It should be inconceivable that in a country where most of us can send a five year old to school at least able to write their name and read a little, the schools can’t get one in five of the others to subsistent, functional literacy in 11 years.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  30th June 2016

      I wonder if Hekia could teach us….anything!

      Reply
      • If the schools embraced League Tables instead of protecting their underperformers we’d see a filiip I believe.

        Reply
      • Gezza

         /  30th June 2016

        Carter had to shut Hekia up yesterday in Question Time a couple of times. She gave a wrong answer the day before about some education figures by the sound of it. She asked Carter if she could read out the correct situation & explanation from the Ministry. Carter said “o….k…..but it better end with two numbers”. Two numbers came out eventually. I think it took 3 supplementaries and Carter spent most of her performance chortling. I have no idea what she was talking about. I’m not sure she did.

        Reply

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