Party of Labour?

The Herald has an interactive tool that allows you to compare what sort of people vote for which party – How New Zealanders vote. It combines data from the 2014 election results with census data.

You can compare one party with another, or one party against all others.

Comparing the Labour Party to all party votes (it isn’t clear but to the left is ‘other party’ and to the right is the Labour Party preferences):

VotingPreferencesLabourOther

This shows that ‘other party’ votes are more likely to be from all of the part-time employed, the full-time employed and the self employed.

So Labour does not appear to be the favoured party for the majority of workers.

Also interesting is that more full-time students favour other parties rather than Labour.

 

 

7 Comments

  1. Iceberg

     /  8th July 2016

    So, State House tenants don’t even vote for them?

    • Except for Pacific Island state house tenants.

      Remember that only 1 in 4 voted for them last election so there must be gaps in their support somewhere.

      • Iceberg

         /  8th July 2016

        “must be gaps in their support somewhere”

        euphemism of the week

  2. jamie

     /  8th July 2016

    “People in household” is a pretty non-specific demographic 😀

  3. Hollyfield

     /  8th July 2016

    I’m no statistician, but presumably the chart has been prepared for the average Herald reader, and the chart doesn’t make sense to me. Please someone enlighten me if I’ve overlooked something really obvious.

    The chart shows that people with children are more likely to vote for Labour than any other party. It also shows that people without children are more likely to vote for Labour than any other party.

    Since everybody either has or does not have children, does that mean everybody is more likely to vote for Labour than any other party? Yet according to elections.org.nz, only 25% of people voted for Labour at the last election.

    I clicked on the link to see the Herald’s article, and checked out the chart for National. That chart says that people with children are more likely to vote for National than any other party.

    So people with children are more likely to vote for Labour than any other party, and are also more likely to vote for National than any other party.

    Same with Asian – they also are more likely to vote for Labour than any other party, and are also more likely to vote for National than any other party.

    • I’m no statistician either Hollyfield and, possibly for the first time in my life, I actually CAN, rather than cannot, “agree with someone more” … This “interactive tool” appears entirely ludicrous to me.

      There’s no scale or measure, but surely if (let’s say) only 10% of doctorates vote Labour, wouldn’t the same category, “doctorates”, appear on the “other parties” axis?

      And are “Maori”, “non-Academic”, Asian, median income and smokers somehow not workers? The thing is simply absurd!

      Serves its purpose though as a vehicle for Labour put downs.

      • I’d have better said, “shouldn’t the same category, “doctorates”, appear on the other axis as 90% support for “other parties”?

        It’s a “tool” all right, this thing! Bloody laughable …