‘More Muslim than you’

An interesting tweet from@AliIkram

RIP

cnc1hxuvmaany4s

I hadn’t heard of Abdul Sattar Edhi but he has just died and is being widely mourned.

He has been called the ‘Father Teresa of Pakistan’.

Abdul Sattar Edhi (Memoni, Urdu: عبدالستار ایدھی‎; 1 Sindhi: عبدالستار ايڌي‎ January 1928 – 8 July 2016) was a prominent Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, ascetic, and humanitarian. He was the founder and head of the Edhi Foundation in Pakistan and ran the organization for the better part of six decades. He was known as Angel of Mercy and was considered Pakistan’s “most respected” and legendary figure. In 2013, The Huffington Post said that he might be “the world’s greatest living humanitarian.”

Revered by many as a national hero, Edhi created a charitable empire out of nothing. He masterminded Pakistan’s largest welfare organisation almost single-handedly, entirely with private company and donations.

Wikipedia:

Al Jazeera refers to him as legendary and “a prominent Pakistani philanthropist and humanitarian”.

Thousands attend funeral for Pakistan’s legendary Edhi

Tens of thousands attended the state funeral for Pakistan’s legendary philanthropist Abdul Sattar Edhi in Karachi.

Prominent Pakistani philanthropist and humanitarian Abdul Sattar Edhi was laid to rest on the outskirts of Karachi on Saturday at a state funeral attended by thousands of people. 

Edhi, 88, died late on Friday at a medical centre after a long battle with kidney disease. His death triggered a massive outpouring of grief across the nation of 190 million for a man who trancended social, ethnic and religious divisions. 

Tens of thousands attended Saturday’s ceremony, the first state funeral since the 1980s, at Karachi’s National Stadium. 

At one moment, crowds broke through the military lines to help carry Edhi’s coffin, which was draped with Pakistan’s green and white flag and covered with rose petals. 

Pakistan’s top civilian and army leadership offered funeral prayers at the stadium, as the country mourned the loss of a man commonly known as the “Angel of Mercy” for his internationally acclaimed social work.

For more than 60 years the Edhi Foundation, a charity he created with his wife, Bilquise, has run clinics and orphanages across Pakistan and managed a fleet of ambulances that provided much-needed assistance to poor communities failed by an inadequate public health and welfare system. 

“He was one of the chosen ones. People like him come once in many centuries, and he was a special chosen one,” one woman, who asked to remain anonymous, told Al Jazeera at the funeral.

A hero to the poor

Born in the western state of Gujarat in British India, Edhi and his Muslim family moved to Pakistan in 1947 during the violent partition of the subcontinent.

He built up his charity solely through donations, focusing on addicts, battered women, orphans and the disabled.

Despite the vast sums of money that passed through his charitable foundation, Edhi lived modestly with his family in a two-room apartment adjacent to the headquarters of his foundation.

Renowned for an ascetic lifestyle and recognised by his long white beard and traditional black cap, Edhi was a hero to the poor but infuriated some religious leaders with his refusal to give preferential treatment to Muslims above minorities.

He also berated hardline groups for attacking civilians, criticised the government for incompetence and corruption, and denounced tax-dodging by the rich.

Despite constant threats, the Edhi Foundation became Pakistan’s most relied upon social safety net, handling many of the responsibilities that the Pakistani government could not.

The Edhi foundation was at the forefront of the response last year when a devastating heatwave struck Karachi, a city of more than 20 million people.

Sounds like a good bloke who did extremely well in a challenging part of the world..

It’s good to see someone who does so much and uses religion positively and not to discriminate.

Leave a comment

25 Comments

  1. Brown

     /  11th July 2016

    Good bloke, shitty Muslim.

    Reply
    • They ask thee what they should spend (In charity). Say: Whatever ye spend that is good, is for parents and kindred and orphans and those in want and for wayfarers. And whatever ye do that is good, -Allah knoweth it well.
      Quran 2:215

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  11th July 2016

        “Fight those who believe not in Allah nor the Last Day, nor hold that forbidden which hath been forbidden by Allah and His Messenger, nor acknowledge the religion of Truth, (even if they are) of the People of the Book, until they pay the Jizya with willing submission, and feel themselves subdued.” — Qur’an 9:29

        https://yournz.org/2016/07/08/guest-post-muslim-immigration/#comment-115489

        Reply
        • What’s that got to do with Brown’s comment, Gezza?

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  12th July 2016

            That’s what the Quran tells him he should do, Ugly Truth.
            I call you Uggers becoz I don’t like to call you Ugly. To me, you’re not.

            Reply
            • Not in all circumstances:

              So if they remove themselves from you and do not fight you and offer you peace, then Allah has not made for you a cause [for fighting] against them.
              Quran 4:90

        • Gezza

           /  12th July 2016

          I understand that Uggers. But if you re-read my post, what I am saying is with any religion of scripture, believers can choose, or be told, which verse predominates, or justifies behaviour, when the believer is ignorant, or angry, or for whatever reason wants to kill another—and it is a simple matter then to do it.

          Apparently conflicting verses like these are unhelpful, however much others read the same things & decide that their behaviours should be tolerant & generous, by putting their readings in an appropriate context—based on their being good human beings.

          Muhammad was a warrior. His actions are recorded in Hadith. He had people who at first accepted his rule, but then rebelled against it, executed a whole tribe. He had a man suffer a fire being burned on his chest to make him reveal where treasure was. He is their perfect man. They are supposed to emulate him. He cannot be criticised. Neither can Islam, or Allah (insert copious praises) around any of those who believe most stongly in The Quran, and Mohammad’s (pbuh) near-divinity as a role model.

          This is why I wrote my post. This is why I don’t like that religion – which is based on an obvious fantasy, & which served Muhammad to unite credulous people & warring Arab tribes with a culture of venegance utu, subject them all to the same set of rules of behaviour that got more & more extensive as time went on, and as the situation & his need to direct them & cover different situations, changed.

          The result is that some who follow strict fundamentalist interpretations of Quran & hadith, allied with what they themselves consider can be held to mean defending Islam, are mass killers, and suicide attackers.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  12th July 2016

          @ Uggers. I used to visit & read an anti-Muslim forum where one Muslim poster continued to win a lot of arguments. He said on numerous occasions that abrogation has already occurred. That verses no longer in effect were removed when Muhammad & the angel Gabriel reviewed all & re-sorted his memorised verses—dictated by him and written down by scribes—over a period of 23 years.

          He said it was not correct to say abrogation means the better verse is preferred. And anyway, who decides which is the better verse? Depends what you want to do.

          Reply
      • Nelly Smickers

         /  11th July 2016

        Nelly 21:30

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  11th July 2016

          Hanging around – or Czech exit?

          URBAN DICTIONARY:
          Polish Exit
          The sudden & unannounced leaving of a party, group of people, or individual without notifying anyone. There is no discernible reason, no goodbye, & no mercy.
          The golden rules:
          1. Be sneaky.
          2. No guilty conscience.
          3. Don’t tell anyone.
          4. Take advantage of the moment.
          5. An announced exit is a czech exit.
          6. Don’t turn around.
          7. Turn off your phone.
          “Wait, wasn’t Drew JUST here? Where did he go?!”
          “Yeah…looks like he just pulled a Polish Exit”
          “That douche.”

          Reply
        • Seriously, fuck the “civilized world” if they they believe those three lies (Allah is a title, not a proper name, so the first statement is actually true).

          “The civilized world” is based on the vanity and hypocrisy of Rome and its “universal” belief system.

          Above all: “appellari ceteros homines, esse solos eos, qui essent politi propriis humanitatis artibus” (De re publica I, xvii, 28).[29] “Thus, not all men are humani or demonstrate humanitas. Only in the civilization of the Roman Empire and its social order does humanitas count as an educational value and socio-ethical virtue. Those who live outside the Empire are not yet fully ‘human,’ they are ‘barbarians’.”

          http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/revues/surfaces/vol4/birus.html

          human being See MONSTER.
          Ballentine’s Law Dictionary (1930)

          Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  11th July 2016

    Great post, PG. Thanks.

    Reply
  3. Corky

     /  12th July 2016

    The quote is very interesting. I wonder if such comments come from predominately young men, or just average Muslims like those we allow into our country?

    Reply
  4. Corky

     /  12th July 2016

    There’s a big controversy around medical treatment of Muslims. This is one of the reason I have zero tolerance for Islam. Incidentally the first site in this link had my security programmes telling me a concerted effort was being made to obtain my data. These Muslims must have guessed I was an Infidel bent on finding the truth regarding their strange laws.

    https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=muslim+women+and+doctors&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b-ab&gfe_rd=cr&ei=jf-DV6XYIbPM8gf5ipDgAw

    Reply
  5. Gezza, your comments are enlightening, and some of the more measured responses have added value for me. When one looks at Muhammed swt, there seems to be a duopoly at work. On one hand, the warrior chief who took the disunited tribes of the Bedouin and reformed them into a superb fighting unit. Such were the divisions in Bedouin society, his personal disciplining of his men was ruthless. His treatment of his opponents was even more ruthless, if that was possible. But his strategic sense was excellent, and he moulded his group from small victories to the big ones. If Sun Tzu hadn’t written “On War”, then I am sure Mohammed would have composed the essential handbook on guerrilla warfare.

    His second persona was Mohammed, the Apostle. He claimed to be recounting what Gabriel passed on as the words of Allah, and thus brought into being that compilation we know as the
    Quaran (Koran). At the same time his worldly statements were recorded by scribes and from that we get the Hadith. It is from the Hadith that we get so many alternative interpretations of what Mohammed said, and what he meant. I believe fervently in freedom, in thought word and deed, trite as that may sound. I studied comparative religions at Royal Military College Dubtroon, and noted a certain modern appeal to the underlying message in the Quoran. However, it is not for me as a religion or a way of life because it is incompatible with real freedom, and that is why I believe we should minimise the influence in our free society, New Zealand.

    Reply
    • Liberty is incompatible with absolute freedom, both liberty and Islam recognize that there should be limits to behaviour.

      Reply
  6. Jeeves

     /  13th July 2016

    There is no god.
    Why does everyone act like there is?

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  13th July 2016

      There’s no God as mythologised in any of the major religions, I agree.

      Is there a creator?

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  13th July 2016

        How could you tell?

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  13th July 2016

          How could you not?

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  13th July 2016

            I find it very easy not to do something, Gezza. Doing something is much more complicated. Especially verifying the existence of a creator.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  13th July 2016

              Exactly. (I put that rather badly.)
              I, of course, meant how you could you tell there was not a creator?

              I just look at the evidence we’ve got so far. It’s inconclusive.

              Where do you think the universe came from?

    • Blazer

       /  13th July 2016

      God only….knows!

      Reply
    • You have no logical basis to say that.

      Reply

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