Elites, Maori Party, Clark, UN

Rob Hosking writes in NBR On revolt against the elites, the Maori Party & Helen Clark’s UN bid (paywall), and posted an excerpt on Twitter:

 

 

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15 Comments

  1. Pete Kane

     /  7th August 2016

    Good timing
    “Tina Ngata – The Non-Plastic Maori
    Back in May Tina Ngata travelled to New York to make a submission to the UN Permanent Forum for Indigenous Issues. Tina, who blogs under the name the non-plastic Maori, condemned Helen Clark’s track-record on indigenous rights and suggested there could be better candidates than the former Kiwi PM for the top job at the UN. Ten weeks later it hit the headlines.”

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  7th August 2016

      ”The Non-Plastic Maori”. What a joke. Her moko marks her as plastic as a plastic bucket. Strong Maori women don’t need a Moko to show they are “the real deal.”

      Reply
      • Joe Bloggs

         /  8th August 2016

        I don’t follow your logic – because there isn’t any. Acknowledging ones cultural heritage by wearing to moko doesn’t weaken a person, or dilute how real a deal they are.

        What Ngata is doing is honouring her cultural identity. What you’re doing is dishonouring it.

        Reply
      • Joe Bloggs

         /  8th August 2016

        Incidently Corky, Ngata calls herself the non-plastic Maori because she stopped buying plastics – products made of plastic and products wrapped in plastic – where non-plastic alternaives were available. She did this in an effort to take more responsibility for the environment. Not a bad effort for a ‘plastic bucket’ Maori, eh e hoa?

        Reply
        • pickled possum

           /  8th August 2016

          Thank You Joe. I went to Tina’s web site and was Blown away with her clear, concise very knowledgeable korero. She deals with each issue she speaks about, in great informing depth. Well done Tina

          If we all followed her kaupapa and said No More plastics, the air would be a much cleaner and breathable.

          To start as an individual to heal the world, it will soon become a family, village, country, global happening.

          Each of us has a responsibility to maintain a healthy society. We cannot sit back and say “What is every one else doing?”

          ” Factory Asia, who is responsible for producing over half of all the world’s goods. That’s all goods.” … “Asia is really emitting greenhouse gases and creating production waste on our behalf ”
          https://thenonplasticmaori.wordpress.com/

          When a woman lies down to have the ta moko imprinted onto her chin, she is accepting the kaupapa that comes with this. A ta moko does not make her a realer deal than another who has the knowledge but not the moko.
          A moko makes her proud to show who and what she represents.
          Tina has no problems what so ever with her realness and as for her strength she is a Wahine Toa.
          To go to that venue and tell her story shows this Wahine has totally commitment and it was so great to see the 3 whea supporting and standing behind her as she gave her submission.

          Reply
    • Pete Kane

       /  7th August 2016

      And the RNZ article that the above relates. A lot of ‘domestic’ politics also at play here – think.
      http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/sunday/audio/201811146/tina-ngata-the-non-plastic-maori

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  7th August 2016

        Tina articulated her justification for her not supporting Helen’s bid for UNSG well. I don’t agree with her position on this – I think she’s letting personal feelings & looking @ H2’s tenure through a miscroscope get in the way of looking at the bigger picture. She ignored the question about whether there were more important issues for Maori these days.

        It was interesting to hear that Dame Tariana Turia supports H2’s bid for the Big Job.

        Something I find interesting is that I clearly remember, in the first few months of the commencement of the Klark Administration, the word coming down quietly from on high @ the Beehive to departments that not enough Maori were considered to be in positions of senior management, & that something was expected to be done about it, and quickly.

        Where I was working, it was. Elevations occurred within weeks. I had the pleasure to work on many occasions with one Maori woman of the same age as me who was promoted into the Senior Management Group into a new position where she had very little to actually do, but did it well, and was an intelligent, competent fill-in for any Senior Manager when required. She deserved appointment to a proper job,

        I also had the disappointment of working next to another young Maori man who was similarly promoted, but to a Section Head position, where it quickly became obvious he completely lacked the key skills required to perform the job & although we was a great guitarist & we got on really well at the personal level I had to eventually give up trying to help him as he was never going to be up to the job. He eventually left for a senior tutoring job, which he was unable to keep.

        H1’s record is mixed in this area I believe.

        Reply
  2. Corky

     /  7th August 2016

    Robo’s right. Labour thought they had the native vote in perpetuity. Labour was very upset when they found out Maori, in modern times, now thought of them as patronising colonials.
    Tari’s limo was taken off her. John Tamihere, who work hard to implement Maori focused programmes to tackle chronic Maori issues, had his funding denied and programmes ignored by Steve Maharey. Bad blood between the two still exists today.

    As the Maori party have learnt, National is a far more benevolent plantation owner. They get to keep some of the produce. And they get pocket money.

    Reply
  3. Maybe someone should take Rob Hosking aside and explain to him that a right and a permission are different things. You give permission when you allow someone to do something, rights relate to ethics, not political whims.

    Reply

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