Intelligence and Security legislation

The Government is introducing a bill to Parliament this week as a result of the review done by Sir Michael Cullen and Dame Patsy Reddy.

I think this is potentially a good move, as long as they get the right balance between improved security, improved transparency, and protection of privacy for the vast majority of New Zealanders who are not a threat.


Intelligence and Security legislation introduced

Prime Minister John Key today introduced a bill to update the legislative framework and improve the transparency of New Zealand’s intelligence and security agencies.

The New Zealand Intelligence and Security Bill 2016 is the Government’s response to the first independent review of intelligence and security presented to Parliament in March 2016 by Sir Michael Cullen and Dame Patsy Reddy.

“At the heart of this Bill is the protection of New Zealanders,” says Mr Key. “We have an obligation to ensure New Zealanders are safe at home and abroad.

“Therefore it is vital our agencies operate under legislation which enables them to be effective in an increasingly complex security environment, where we are confronted by growing numbers of cyber threats and the rise of terrorist groups such as ISIL.

Mr Key says the Government has accepted the majority of recommendations put forward in Sir Michael and Dame Patsy’s independent review.

“The bill is the most significant reform of the agencies’ legislation in our country’s history,” says Mr Key.

“It clearly sets out the agencies’ powers, builds on the robust oversight for the agencies we introduced in 2013 and establishes a new warranting regime.

“At the same time, it protects the privacy and human rights of New Zealanders.”

Key aspects of the legislation include:

  • Creating a single Act to cover the agencies, replacing the four separate acts which currently exist.
  • Introducing a new warranting framework for intelligence collection, including a ‘triple lock’ protection for any warrant involving a New Zealander.
  • Enabling more effective cooperation between the NZSIS and GCSB.
  • Improving the oversight of NZSIS and GCSB by strengthening the role of the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security and expanding parliamentary oversight.
  • Bringing the NZSIS and GCSB further into the core public service, increasing accountability and transparency.

“As I have said before, we are keen to get broad political support for this legislation,” says Mr Key.

“The Government takes its national security obligations very seriously. New Zealanders can be assured we are taking careful and responsible steps to protect their safety and security.”

The Bill has been introduced today. The first reading will be on Thursday.

For more information visit https://www.dpmc.govt.nz/ins

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17 Comments

  1. Kitty Catkin

     /  15th August 2016

    Fairy Nuff.

    Reply
  2. Nelly Smickers

     /  15th August 2016

    Wayne was just saying we can only hope this Bill receives the *full backing* of ALL other parties.

    Who could disagree with the premise that the Bill is designed to *protect all New Zealanders*, both at home and abroad.

    *God forbid* we ever see happen here what has just occurred in the likes of Belgium and France.

    *New Zealand for New Zealanders*……as Wayne sez, “the alternative just doesn’t bear thinking about” ❗

    Reply
    • “Who could disagree with the premise that the Bill is designed to *protect all New Zealanders*, both at home and abroad.”

      Protection comes with strings attached, in this case it is the liability of being under a corrupt system.

      Reply
  3. Gezza

     /  15th August 2016

    On TVOne plus one News ma noted they said objections were already being raised that the new legislation does not define “national security”.

    If this is correct, one hopes that it can not be interpreted, beyond what might be considered an everyperson’s general understanding of its meaning, to mean that it also refers to a particular political party.

    Reply
  4. Blazer

     /  15th August 2016

    Can’t see how it will keep NZ’ers safe at all.Can see how the powers could be misused by people with dubious political or commercial agendas however.Thoreau….’ Most men lead lives of quiet desperation ‘!

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  15th August 2016

      Hoping that these two might help minimise the potential for abuse of power:

      * Improving the oversight of NZSIS and GCSB by strengthening the role of the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security and expanding parliamentary oversight.
      * Bringing the NZSIS and GCSB further into the core public service, increasing accountability and transparency.

      All depends of course on who the IGIS is, and who is running NZIS & GCSB. The public service generally is badly failing on the making available of official information these days & political interference can’t be ruled out imo – even if it takes the form of underfunding departments – collation, review, including by Legal, and required deletions or redactions of OI releases can be extremely time-consuming, especially on top of existing workloads.

      Reply
    • patupaiarehe

       /  15th August 2016

      Do you really believe that they don’t already spy on NZers Blazer? I think one would be a fool to think not. What this legislation will do is make any info gathered admissible in court. So rather than having to wait for an extremist nutjob to actually hurt someone, they can be locked up for conspiracy before he/she does so.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  16th August 2016

        these draconian laws against individual freedoms already exist in other countries.What evidence supports their effectiveness in preventing extremist acts of terror….thats right…NONE.

        Reply
  5. Blazer

     /  16th August 2016

    the ‘Spy’ who went out into the….Cold!

    http://pastebin.com/2ybz27UE

    Reply
  6. I am glad that we are part of Five Eyes. I am glad we have a Security Service that protects those among us who operate legally, within what is a broad set of liberal, legal and social parameters. Likewise, I am glad that the system has checks and balances for those who are, ostensibly, operating outside the “normal” parameters. They are now quite protected as to how information is both garnered, gathered and collated on them, should the system deem it necessary.
    Back in my anti-establishment, anarchic days I could never imagine saying this, but here it is. We live in a very free society, where anybody who respects the freedom of others can undertake many acts that run counter to the state line, and they can do so in the knowledge that as long as they obey the laws of the land they are free to do so. The clincher, a statement so lmapooned and hated by reactionaries, is the saying: “Nothing to hide, nothing to fear”.
    I cannot imagine a freer, fairer society than NZ exists elsewhere. It’s not perfect, but it comparatively inclusive and liberal.

    Reply

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