Drone delivered junk food

Minister of something Simon Bridges has been involved in a promotional stunt for a quantity rather than quality fast food outlet – apparently they are going to trial drone home deliveries.

This seems stupid to me – apart from getting some free media publicity.

There’s so many potential safety and logistical issues.

The drone isn’t going to be able to deliver to your table, especially if you live in an apartment.

Most deliveries will be at night so darkness will be an issue with poles and wires and buildings and trees to avoid, as well as traffic, people and pets.

And what if there are drones buzzing all over town from different outlets? Who is going to do traffic control?

For what? Something you can make at home, or get delivered the way it happens now.

Sure they will be able to succeed in some situations but I think there’s going to be many deliveries that will be too difficult.

Drone deliveries are someth8ing we don’t need and I’m very doubtful they will be very successful part from a few stunts.

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35 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  26th August 2016

    I’m looking forward to being able to shoot down a pizza.

    Seriously, this is going to happen. I was talking about the possibilities with a colleague five years ago. There are problems but they will be overcome.

    http://flirtey.com/

    Reply
    • I agree for once Alan, although I don’t particularly like the situation.

      Not only is outdoor drone deliveries inevitable, given mankind’s obsessive craving for labour-saving technology, there’ll be indoor drone deliveries as well, mark my words.

      Drones will replace waiters, waitresses, order takers and service crew eventually and I forsee the day when some fast food outlets will be entirely mechanised, from drive-thru to counter-service, kitchen, cleaning, the lot … One human manager will oversee the whole operation and be the entire ‘staff’ ….

      I wonder how kids will get their first employment experiences then?

      We know the junk isn’t food, and pretty soon the people – already graduates in KiwiHost uniformity – won’t be people but completely standardised machines …

      Labour-saving devices are not intrinsically bad, it’s just the contemporary trend, driven to insane extremes by neoliberalism, evidences the fact people do not necessarily want to save themselves work or ‘labour’. Instead, particularly in the form of employers and to a lesser extent demanding customers, “they” only want to save themselves PAYING for labour.

      So if “they” get away with NOT PAYING for human labour, what happens to all the human beings displaced by the machines? No doubt some people will design, build and service the machines …

      People are trying to overcome the problems impeding machines taking over human jobs. I don’t see anyone trying to overcome the problem of why we want this and what the bulk of workers are going to do when it happens …?

      Reply
      • “Chances are that slim minority are exactly those families most likely to be involved in terrorism.”

        For convenience and fast food maybe.

        But decent dining experiences are also becoming more popular, and people delivering services are generally key components.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  26th August 2016

          Still trying to figure out WTF with that first sentence in quotes … o_O

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  26th August 2016

            Was meant to be: Not only is outdoor drone deliveries inevitable, given mankind’s obsessive craving for labour-saving technology, there’ll be indoor drone deliveries as well, mark my words. I guess.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  26th August 2016

              No I meant PG’s first sentence, Al:

              “Chances are that slim minority are exactly those families most likely to be involved in terrorism.”

              I thought, maybe he’s onto something here – drones could be useful to terrorists too, but how are they going to attack us with fast food?

              I’m thinking maybe that sentence was meant for somewhere else? It’s a bit Blaiser-like. Just sort of *out there*?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  26th August 2016

              Copy/paste from his last comment elsewhere. Meant to be the one I cited but obviously his copy didn’t work and he didn’t notice.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  27th August 2016

            I didn’t put it like that, Gezza, but I can’t understand it, either.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  27th August 2016

              Looks like he copied something to his clipboard to paste in another thread else, and accidentally pasted it in here Kitty.

            • Gezza

               /  27th August 2016

              * elsewhere

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  26th August 2016

        Everyone will use robots personally and in their work. Robots are gradually taking over manual work but they are far from taking over intellectual and social work. For those, they are simply tools.

        Reply
      • Gezza

         /  26th August 2016

        @ PZ

        People are trying to overcome the problems impeding machines taking over human jobs. I don’t see anyone trying to overcome the problem of why we want this and what the bulk of workers are going to do when it happens …?

        Yep. That is the challenge. Already I happily enough use the automated checkout for my grocery shopping if there are only a few items – but only at New World. The Countdown one is more complicated & I only use theirs if there are queues at the staffed checkouts.

        But on the other hand they seem to have a lot more staff working in an expanded Deli-kitchen, an in-store cafe, and stocking up shelves, and in New World the whole place seems to have a person-friendly feel to it. The pay’s probably not great (but I don’t know that) but most of the staff seem genuinely happy to be working there.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  27th August 2016

          Drones making deliveries of things like pizzas (I don’t eat these, but junk food seems an unnecessarily emotive term) are not new. I can’t quite see the point. It must make them expensive.

          I like Pak & Save’s DIY checkout & sometimes sneak a few extra things through, I must admit . The nice thing about P & S is that they know the difference between ‘less’ and ‘fewer’. I’d go to P & S just for that. The Countdown one can be fiddly, I agree, and error-prone.

          There are things that robots are unlikely to do. I know that they can do operations, but they can do them on someone else, thank you.

          Reply
  2. Iceberg

     /  26th August 2016

    Robotics are a part of the production and distribution channel for most things we consume. The human is being removed from more if it at every opportunity. Drones will deliver everything in the end. Not just flying ones.

    Reply
    • For that to happen there needs to be some sort of secure and safe delivery system rather than having drones driving and flying all over the place.

      I don’t think I’m of a a drone demographic.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  26th August 2016

        I don’t think you are either, PG. Yes, it will have to be safe and secure. I presume that will be a combination of route planning/reservation and collision avoidance technology.

        Reply
        • Digital delivery by wireless or by fibre perhaps, reassembling the atoms at the destination.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  27th August 2016

            There are drones everywhere now, and always have been. I’ve worked with a few.

            What if the reassembly went wrong and the KFC (for argument’s sake) was a homogeneous mass ? Or the milkshake container was omitted, so that it was reassembled without one ?

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  27th August 2016

              Or the chicken was reassembled in milkshake form and the milkshake as a milkshakeburger ? Or….

  3. lurcher1948

     /  26th August 2016

    More chance of seeing a flying pig delivering pizza,Please tell me how much bridges gets payed to promote crap like this and does his mother know hes escaped from his bedroom?

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  26th August 2016

      Bridges is next to irrelevant to this development. It will be driven by much smarter people.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  27th August 2016

        Lurch, this has been done for a while, it’s not new. Google it, if you don’t believe me. It’s not 1948 now, this is the 21st century.

        Do you expect to be paid for everything you do ? Why assume that other people do ?

        Reply
  4. Blazer

     /  26th August 2016

    Reply
  5. Chris Keall at NBR: Dominos’ drone delivery trial is PR BS

    There are technical drawbacks with today’s drone technology, including lousy battery life (in response to an NBR query, Dominos said a drone would last “one or two flights”).

    But the main issue is Civil Aviation Authority rules around UAVs, which were introduced in July last year.

    Part 101, rule 11, of the government’s Civil Aviation Rules states “anyone operating a drone must “have consent from anyone you want to fly above.” That’s a deal-breaker in itself.

    But Privacy Commissioner John Edwards highlights another CAA drone rule: “you cannot fly a drone over a person’s property without their permission” (part 101, rule 12).

    That’s going to be a problem under current regulations

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  26th August 2016

      Why? I would have thought in the city where presumably it will be trialled, the routes would be above the streets to avoid buildings anyway.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  26th August 2016

        I can see quite a few of them ending up in the Porirua stream with all the shopping trolleys on a regular basis.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  26th August 2016

          I’m guessing a few pizza delivery guys will be happy for the drones to end up there instead of themselves.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  26th August 2016

            Yeah I was being a bit flippant, I’m also serious at the same time. There is a significant segment of society – particularly teenagers, young men & young women – who would never attack a pizza delivery person, but who absolutely will do everything they can to pull down & or wreck any automated delivery vehicle.

            We can all see evidence of them when we look in the Porirua stream and when we visit patients at Welly hospital. It’s still spanking new, airy, pleasant, clean, helpers everywhere for visitors, staff are pleasant, security is present but low-key, and you walk into all the lifts, with their shiny stainless steel interior walls, and every single one of them is scored & scoured with meaningless gibberish and often just jagged lines of scratches.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  26th August 2016

              Obviously delivery drones operating in Porirua and like-minded areas will be equipped with high voltage Tasers and support fighter drones.

            • Gezza

               /  26th August 2016

              Yep. Twenty trial runs without them will see that organised I reckon.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  27th August 2016

      Maybe they’ll ring up everyone whose house is on the route and ask for permission.

      Reply
  6. Kitty Catkin

     /  27th August 2016

    If the drone itself and not the battery only does ‘one or two flights’, then won’t that make it very expensive ? It’s not very green, either. One or two is a bit alarming-there’s a chance of its doing one and a half and coming down in the wrong place, or staying at the second house, so that they’ll have to dispose of it. If the business has to keep coming out to collect them, they may as well do the oldfashioned delivery run.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  27th August 2016

      Presumably they would use rechargeable battery packs and swap them for each flight if necessary. However Tesla is bringing out a car with a 300 mile range so I doubt that is a long term issue.

      Reply
  7. Kitty Catkin

     /  27th August 2016

    There’d be some very happy dogs if the drones ran out of power and came down in their gardens.

    Reply

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