Fish dumping

I haven’t had time to look into the fish dumping issue but it doesn’t look good.

defends MPI’s handling of after revelations 20-100% of hauls dumped. My

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http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/

Allegations of widespread fish dumping are nothing new. I would have thought serious attempts would have been made to address it, but stunned mullets seem to rule on this.

Is our fishing quote system partly to blame?

While species of fish can be targeted it must be very difficult to avoid catching fish you have no quota for.

Is there a better way to enable viable commercial fishing while also protecting fish stocks?

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9 Comments

  1. David

     /  21st September 2016

    “Is there a better way to enable viable commercial fishing while also protecting fish stocks?”

    The current system incentives dumping, so regardless as to the controls put in place there will always be dumping. The alternative to species quotas are systems like licencing boats for days/time at sea and total catch size.

    Reply
  2. Blazer

     /  21st September 2016

    http://www.newshub.co.nz/nznews/email-shows-mpi-feared-prosecuting-fish-dumpers-2016091619

    ‘Never mind whom the major shareholder of the company named in the reports is… Sanford shareholder and National Party president Peter Goodfellow.’…..cinny @TS.

    Reply
  3. Gezza

     /  21st September 2016

    Nathan Guy, looking in to it:

    Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  21st September 2016

    The problem is that the incentives are poorly aligned. If the quotas were expressed in the form of hours-trawling would that be sufficient incentive to bring home all the catch rather than discarding it? Assuming the boat stayed out until the hold was full then the cost of the round trip to port and back would have to be balanced against the value of the discarded catch.

    My calculation (that might be wrong!) says that it would pay to discard a by-catch if and only if the value of a boat-full of that species was less than the cost of the round trip out to the fishing grounds.

    It would be good if someone could work out whether that criterion would cause any issues for the fisheries.

    Reply
    • Nick Ellis

       /  21st September 2016

      Surely the solution would lie in the development of secondary markets for by-catch. I mean protein is valuable, as animal feed maybe, fish stock/flavouring, dye, medicine…. there must be ways to use it instead of dumping it at sea.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  21st September 2016

        Yes, but if the value is less than the cost of going out to get it then it is not worth having.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  22nd September 2016

          Another moronic down-tick. They are so pitifully pathetic you want to send them a nappy to crap in.

          Reply
  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  21st September 2016

    My calculation:

    Cost of fishing = $f per hour.
    Cost of getting there and back = $g

    Value of species(i) per cu metre = $s(i)
    Average volume of species(i) caught per hour = v(i) cu metres
    Volume of hold = V cu m
    Quota = H hrs

    Value of catch per hour of quota = sum(i=1..n) [v(i).s(i)]
    Number of trips saved by discarding species(j) = H.v(j)/V
    Value of trips saved by discarding species(j) = g.H.v(j)/V
    Value of total catch of species (j) = H.v(j).s(j)

    Discard species (j) when g.H.v(j)/V > H.v(j).s(j)
    i.e. when g/V > s(j)
    or when g > V.s(j)

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  22nd September 2016

      What kind of cretan down-ticks a bit of financial maths? Must be a Lefty moron.

      Reply

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