The left wins the Internet but the right wins the polls

A comment posted at Dim Post.

The Left wins the internet. But the Right wins the polls.

First on “the Right wins the polls”. That’s bollocks.

ACT struggles under 1% in the polls so that is hardly a winning position for them.

National has consistently polled the best for years, but they are hardly “the right”, and they are further left than Labour on some things. Voters are not clearly delineated between left and right, with most closer to somewhere in the middle.

And in the polls currently show the centre right’s hold on power is precarious, which is probably more to do with “the left” – Labour – losing rather than the right winning.

The Left wins the internet

How the hell can anyone claim that? Perhaps some of ‘the Left’ think that they are winning the Internet but they are fighting amongst themselves as much as anything, with the occasional swipe outside their bubble.

Actually it’s common to see people from the left baffled as to why they keep losing, considering how superior they seem to think they and their ideologies are.

Previous Post
Leave a comment

41 Comments

  1. Iceberg

     /  21st September 2016

    Actually, they don’t win the internet either. They think they do based on volume and constant virtue signalling. In reality they just expose how naïve they are.

    Reply
  2. Nick Ellis

     /  21st September 2016

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  21st September 2016

      Unnecessarily rude.

      Reply
      • Nick Ellis

         /  21st September 2016

        It’s an oldie but a goodie, as old as the internet and still true.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  21st September 2016

          Not really, if the point of a debate is to learn stuff you didn’t know. Sometimes you learn it by researching yourself and sometimes from someone else.

          Reply
          • Nick Ellis

             /  21st September 2016

            What have you ever learned from a ‘leftie’? ( that was positive )

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  21st September 2016

              Heaps, even if it was just researching the refutation of what they claim. For example almost all environmentalist claims turn out to be false when you research them properly and it is educational to do so. And sometimes you do discover one that is true which is important to know.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  21st September 2016

              So the rivers aren’t turning green from nitrogen and phosphate runoff?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  21st September 2016

              There are worse problems with lakes, and many are very long standing. And the major change in quality happened when the Ministry changed the way it presented the data, not anything that happened in the environment.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  21st September 2016

              Not in the environment? Do you live near a river?
              http://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/84116972/no-longer-swimmable-a-community-mourns-its-lost-river

              Disclosure: I don’t live by that river. but I did swim in it as a child.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  21st September 2016

              I’m hitting the sack so I don’t have time to check it out, but the first thing to do would be to look at the historic pollution and flow readings for that river held by the local authority. That would tell a story and turning points could be investigated and causes found.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  21st September 2016

              I do live in a Rural town where our water catchment is a river. In the summer we have to buy bottled water and our shower smells like a peat-bog. We are nowhere near a lake( though the rivers that surround us feed into one). It is very reassuring to learn from you that it it simply down to the way the ministry presents it’s data ( or maybe it’s bad juju from the lake running upstream). Thank you Alan, you’ve taught me so much.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  21st September 2016

              No, I haven’t taught you anything because you think you know it all.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  21st September 2016

              Touché

            • Gezza

               /  21st September 2016

              Well, I think we can agree that all ended on a positive note & we’ll be able to learn more tomorrow.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  22nd September 2016

              @Nick, maybe now I’ve taught you something.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  22nd September 2016

              I already knew that you a) Know it all, and b) hold laissez faire free enterprise well above any of the ill effects that result from it. So, no, not really.
              Though I was surprised at your thoughts on green rivers, they are not ‘data’ you can actually go and see them.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  22nd September 2016

              @Nick, no, I am trying to teach you that no-one knows it all and it is always worth going to find out the facts. Looking at a river doesn’t tell you it’s history. My vague recollection is that the Selwyn has been in trouble for a long time and my guess is that what research would show.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  22nd September 2016

              But in the absence of facts vague recollections and guesses will suffice, gotcha. Thanks Al.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  22nd September 2016

              Oh, and if somethings been happening for a long time then it’s not a problem. This is gold.\

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  22nd September 2016

              There is only an absence of willingness to find and check the facts and keep an open mind in the meantime. Which you demonstrate in spades.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  22nd September 2016

              In the case of a green river, fact number 1 is that it’s green.

            • While there are clearly major issues now with water quality rivers have been coloured for eons. Forests in particular leak colours.

              This was a common sight from my childhood: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_nUy1YfrSd5c/ScLNeKhX-9I/AAAAAAAAAh4/aX13tr_M5qQ/w1200-h630-p-nu/cromwell_junction1980scirca_early_1500x1116.jpg

            • Corky

               /  22nd September 2016

              Recycling is good for the planet. The truth? Many recyclables can’t be recycled and go to the tip. I learn’t the hard way and don’t waste my time sorting rubbish anymore, apart from paper and bottles.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  22nd September 2016

              In the 1970s a branch of the Waimak ran red with the effluent from a freezing works. I was involved in a hearing that forced a clean up and that level of pollution doesn’t happen now. The Selwyn is a low flow river and irrigation has certainly affected it for some time. Lake Ellesmere has been grey and silty for generations. When I was young I got my yacht mast stuck in the bottom of it which was like thick soup.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  22nd September 2016

              A lake thats fed by a river thats fed by the mountains is bound to have a silty bottom. Or was it that anaerobic stinky silt?
              Most polluted lake in the country apparently, nutrients they say – from the Selwyn river.

              PG – forests leach tannins into the water, it’s a brown colour, and mostly in slow moving mountain streams not so much the fast running rivers of the plains. That picture you posted shows silt that is most likely from heavy rain in the range that feeds that river.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  22nd September 2016

              I didn’t try to smell it. I was just trying to stand in it and get enough traction to pull my mast out against the wind that was pushing on the hull and couldn’t till a power boat came and gave me a hand. There are lots of factors here. The Selwyn’s flow is extremely seasonal and the shingle it flows over is porous so it actually disappears entirely into the ground in summer. Irrigation has probably affected it by reducing the aquifers below ground. Ellesmere has no sea outflow so is shallow and static. Certainly it has been silty for a long, long time. There has been an enormous amount of work done looking at the issues, for example this: http://www.hortnz.co.nz/assets/Uploads/Selwyn-Waihora-Catchment-Model-Techincal-Report-Final.pdf

              That will show you for example that the Selwyn is only the third greatest pollutant flow into the Lake. And dairying contributes just over half the nitrogen inputs into the system.

            • Nick Ellis

               /  22nd September 2016

              The client list on that report makes me suspect that dairy, irrigation or pork are not going to be found to be a big problem.

      • Pete Kane

         /  21st September 2016

        Very much so, Alan

        Reply
  3. patupaiarehe

     /  21st September 2016

    How exactly does one “win the internet”?

    Reply
    • It’s the first prize.

      The second prize is winning the Internet plus the mainstream media.

      Reply
    • Conspiratoor

       /  22nd September 2016

      I’m not sure it is possible to win the internet pat but it certainly is possible to weigh the damn thing. A little known fact is that all the electrons in circulation on the web at any one time, if sat together on a scale, would weigh about 28.379419365 gms give or take. About the same weight as a big strawberry. Cheers,c

      Reply
  4. Bruce

     /  22nd September 2016

    I think Pete what they mean is they’ve silenced Cameron Slater into irrelevance so that’s winning!
    It’s taken them two years and he’s still around and they’re still obsessed with “bringing him down”.
    Sad really given there’s much larger issues, such as the brand of cat biscuits Key feeds Moonbeam.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s