Labour “all the more certain” to win

Party President Nigel Haworth has said that Labour are “all the more certain” to win next year’s election because of Andrew Little’s leadership.  He was speaking at an event in Dunedin celebrating the centenary of the party.

That’s rather optimistic given the current state of the party and polls.

ODT: Labour confident in its 100th year

The event was held at the Community Gallery to celebrate the party’s centenary exhibition.

It allowed Labour to look back on its achievements with pride.

“We have done the hard yards. The other side has picked up what we’ve done and sort of tinkered with it,” Prof Haworth said.

The party expected a September 2017 general election, and was six months ahead of what it had anticipated in its preparations, Prof Haworth said.

Hard to see how Labour is six months ahead of preparations, unless they mean with fund raising or candidate selection.

Clare Curran acknowledged the party had not always lived up to its ideals.

It had mostly, but not always, stuck to its values.

“Let’s be honest,” she said.

Asked about the comment, Ms Curran told the Otago Daily Times  there was no point  “glossing over” the economic upheaval of the 1980s, but people should remember it was one part of a significant history.

Labour in the 80s rescued the country from the dire economic situation left be Rob Muldoon, nut now some on the left seem to see Lange and Douglas as dirty words.

Mr Little was keen to look forward, rather than back, devoting much of his speaking time to a campaign-style speech that talked about the “Kiwi dream” and the “deep housing crisis”.

Littler has been using those themes for some time.

If elected,  Labour would not put up with further delay to the Dunedin Hospital redevelopment, and would start rebuilding immediately.

‘If’ elected? I thought politicians spoke more positively than that.

Labour would guarantee no loss of services, and would safeguard its status as a “fully fledged” teaching hospital, Mr Little said.

Dunedin hospital has battled against losses of services for decades under successive governments. With the city and coastal Otago falling behind other parts the country population-wise and the ongoing centralising of expensive health facilities it’s hard to see the level of services maintained.

Listening to Mr Little’s speech was Labour supporter Richard Thomson, deputy commissioner of the Southern District Health Board and a member of the hospital redevelopment partnership group.

He declined to comment when approached by the ODT.

Thomson will know the reality of the situation.

labourstan

Does anyone recognise this dude?

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

39 Comments

  1. Iceberg

     /  24th September 2016

    “was six months ahead of what it had anticipated in its preparations”

    I expect that they’ve organised the ladies to bring a plate.

    Reply
  2. Zedd

     /  24th September 2016

    I wont put a bet on it yet.. BUT if the ‘missing million’ get of their A’s in 2017, it could be a landslide to Labour-Greens (& any other current opposition party who join in) ! 😀

    Reply
  3. Corky

     /  24th September 2016

    “Labour in the 80s rescued the country from the dire economic situation left be Rob Muldoon, nut now some on the left seem to see Lange and Douglas as dirty words.”

    The great irony of our time. Rob the socialist, who wanted a fair New Zealand for all, sent the country into a tailspin. We were rescued by a Rightie called Rodger Douglas, who was a member of the Labour Party. You couldn’t script this stuff. What a strange little country.

    Reply
    • I think it was a rude awakening (for some) to the reality that left versus right doesn’t apply any more.

      A number of people are still living a political nightmare though. The socialist or the capitalist revolution must have clear sides to fight against.

      Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  24th September 2016

    “Does anyone recognise this dude?”

    Is it Chapman, Pete?

    Reply
    • Nope. Who’s Chapman?

      He’s an ex-Cabinet Minister in the Lange Government. I wonder what he thinks of Clare dissing his time in office.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th September 2016

        That’s Benson-Pope today?

        (I was thinking of Sir George, Sue Wood’s predecessor – images are small on the iPad.)

        Reply
        • Benson-Pope came later, this century in Cabinet, and is currently standing to get back in to Dunedin City Council.

          It’s Sideline Stan.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  24th September 2016

            Stanley Rodger. Well I never. I’ve met him & shaken his paw. He was a gent.

            Reply
            • I wouldn’t have recognised him, actually i didn’t recognise him, I had to read his name amongst the MPs who think his ilk were traitors.

            • Yes. Dunedin North MP from 1978 to 1990 when he retired.

              He was the Minister of Labour, State Services and State Owned Enterprises in the Lange Government.

            • Gezza

               /  24th September 2016

              He was a dear old chap. Not one for wrestling with a problem. Go with the flow type.

            • spanish_tudor

               /  24th September 2016

              “Sideline Stan” as he was known, due to his reluctance to get involved in a union stoush.

  5. I don’t see any point in looking back. I am more concerned about the future for my children and grand-children. The Global security picture is not a pretty scene and we are no longer on the edges of the strategic focus with the US, Russia, China, Korea and Japan trying to assert hegemony in the Pacific. Australia has shown its strategic position and has firmly attached its standard to the US mast. Where does New Zealand stand? If we decide to be “neutral” in order to maximise the rewards of trade with the Communist Left, what guarantees are there that we will be allowed to adopt that position without losing the cherished freedoms in a democratic society we have enjoyed since 1945 on the back of the sacrifices of our parents and grandparents? Our token contribution to the Western Forces since 1953 (after Korea and Malaya) and the continued sacrifice of combat power from our Defence Force for welfare, education and health purposes has placed NZ in a position where it has to choose sides. The main question (I avoided saying the “Key question”) is surely who do we trust to navigate us through the next two decades during which time we undoubtably will be tested in our resolve to protect our precious way of life? Do we continue to be a wanna have wanna be society or will we become a true community concerned for all of our people of all backgrounds and a community prepared to share with the needy. I have some feelings of optimism, but then I believe the glass is half full! Who should lead the nation and in what direction is the question.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  24th September 2016

      I’ve been pondering your last sentence for half an hour andnow I reckon I’m suffering from clinical depression Bj. 🤕

      Reply
      • Conspiratoor

         /  24th September 2016

        It’s possible that you’re feeling a little down G but it’s unlikely to be of the clinical variety. Cheers,c

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  24th September 2016

          You haven’t seen my medicine cabinet c.

          Reply
          • Conspiratoor

             /  24th September 2016

            If you can get a hold of it, morphines good shit G. I got a jab once and spent the next three days on the ceiling looking down on myself.
            By the way, can recommend the whitebait restaurant down on the welly waterfront

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  24th September 2016

              I once had a migraine get totally out of control and ended up at the emergency clinic. It was that bad I could barely communicate & was hoping I might get a taste, c. But when the nurse came in she told me all I was getting was a jab in the botty with bloody voltaren. Good luck if you can find a botty, I said. Oh, she replied, I think a small bottom is a very desirable thing in a man. That headache was gone in 15 minutes. Unfortunately, so was she.

  6. Kitty Catkin

     /  24th September 2016

    Anyone who says that something WILL happen-something that can’t be known, that is-is tempting fate.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  24th September 2016

      I suppose that nothing can be said to be going to happen, of course. But you know what I mean.

      Reply
  7. Zedd

     /  24th September 2016

    looks a bit like Bernie Sanders OR maybe Col. Sanders ? 😀

    Reply
  8. patupaiarehe

     /  24th September 2016

    Party President Nigel Haworth has said that Labour are “all the more certain” to win next year’s election because of Andrew Little’s leadership.

    Why is Nigel wasting his life working for the Labour party? IMHO his ‘talents’ would be far better utilized as an ad writer for a brewery in Mangatainoka…

    Reply
  9. Alan Wilkinson

     /  24th September 2016

    I suspect the end isn’t nigh. I don’t see Key hitching his wagon to President Trump. I see him playing his cards carefully in the shadows of the big players. There are enough to play off against each other.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  24th September 2016

      That’s in response to BJ’s apocalyptic vision.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th September 2016

        I think it’s really time for a change from National. They’re too sluggish now.
        The problem I have is replacing them with what? We’ve had two strong leaders of two main parties who dominated smaller coaltion parties and formed long lasting governments with generally good Finance Ministers.

        We don’t have any experience of coalitions made up of more evenly balanced numbers of members of several parties and proper coalition-style government with several Ministers from each party. The prospect scares me, frankly. I just can’t see how the parties we’ve got would all manage to run a government collegially.

        So I think kiwis are still likely to keep voting for one main party to dominate any coalition, and that shows in the polls.

        Reply
  10. My hope for my descendants is that there will emerge a leader for New Zealand skilled in International Diplomacy who can manage our position in the Global scene of things in order to protect our trade access to all countries that want or need to trade with us. He or she must be able to negotiate NZ away from direct involvement in the inevitable next major conflict. She or he will need to have direct support by clever financial and economic managers and expertise in the management of the essential elements of our daily lives (Education, Health, Justice, Social Welfare, Defence Security and Police. Behind that I also see a need for a rewrite of the ethics of our Public Service to more efficiently and effectively meet the needs of the 5-6 Million Kiwis as we approach 2030. Then ask yourself do Peters, Little and Key have the right equipment for the job and the political desire to see us through?

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  25th September 2016

      Key says he is intent on winning a fourth term and seeing it out as PM. I do think he has the skill to achieve what you set out. Peters has the skill but not the temperament or inclination. Little doesn’t have anything except dogmatic determination.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s