The Nation – vulnerable children and Hobson’s Pledge

This morning on The Nation (TV3 at 9.30 am, also Sunday at 10.00 am):

Andrew Becroft on the new Ministry for Vulnerable Children… is it the fix we need?

Becroft is the Children’s Commissioner – website.

Andrew Becroft says we’ve got a once in a lifetime opportunity to raise the youth justice age.

Does Becroft share ‘s concerns about resources? We ought to be able to cope with slight adjustment.

After this interview, ‘s Becroft is meeting with the Indian Association about the youth justice age.

The youth justice system is not milo-drinking kumbaya says Becrof.

NZ needs some do-able targets for child poverty says Becroft. Becroft wants to see a 5-10% reduction of child poverty by the end of next year.

“A once in a lifetime opportunity to get it right” again.

“Unless this agency is resourced properly upfront… we’re just setting ourselves up for another review” says Becroft on new Ministry.

Says is not sufficiently resourced, and he’s talking with Minister Tolley.

Don Brash and Labour’s Louisa Wall go head to head on his new lobby group Hobson’s Pledge.

Hobson’s Pledge website: “He iwi tahi tatou : We are now One People”

That’s not really a pledge, it’s a vague statement from one person who was involved which hardly represents ‘One people’.

Louisa Wall is an MP well down Labour’s pecking order (ahead of only one MP who hasn’t announced they are quitting). She was prominent during the marriage equality bill debate but otherwise has a low profile.

Wall is responsible for:

  • Spokesperson for Courts
  • Spokesperson for Youth Affairs
  • Associate Justice Spokesperson (Legal Aid)
  • Associate Sport and Recreation Spokesperson

So not sure why she has been put forward here.

Nanaia Mahuta is spokesperson for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations and Peeni Henare has several Maori spokesperson roles.

There is also a report on the anniversary of the battle of the Somme.

Also something on the Trans-Pacific Partnership apparently.

 

 

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8 Comments

  1. “Once in a lifetime opportunity to get it right”. How many times have I heard that cry? At least twice in each administration, if not mistaken. The Elephant is still in the room, and until the community as a whole do not recognise its presence, it will remain in the room. It needs a cultural change amongst those who are the criminally violent induced by drugs including alcohol and entrenched belief in historical grievances and sexual permissiveness leading to large families and single parent homes that are destined to a hard and poor life. More mature reflection and commonsense are needed. Life is actually meant to be enjoyed, and people should invest effort in making themselves and others happy. Each person is the master or mistress of their bodies and the individual must take control of their situation and not expect others to resolve their problems for them. We need to cherish our children as they are the only lasting thing anyone of us leaves for the future. Exert your right to intervene when obvious wrong is seen, but don’t place yourself in a dangerous situation. In that case, back off and call the Police.

    Reply
  2. Gezza

     /  1st October 2016

    Becroft – Raising Youth Justice Age, Child Poverty & Ministry For Vulnerable Children – Oranga Tamariki. Intelligent man, well informed, good communicator – worth a listen.

    Brash & Wall – 2 people talking about 2 completely different things. Neither seemed particularly well informed about historical Maori land loss. Brash constantly interrupting Wall so the pair of them both end up talking at the same time. Lisa Owen completely useless as neutral interviewer and moderator – again. Segment too short to be of any value given overall shambolism. Not worth a listen.

    WW1 segment. Why was NZ involved? Interesting, for me anyway.

    Panel discussion at end was only really about Becroft, Losi Filipo & throwaway lines about Colin Craig’s trial being lurid, him being expected to fight the decision all the way to the top because ‘Litigious is his middle name’, & his political career being dead in the water forever now.

    Forgettable.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  1st October 2016

      Oh, TPPA. I was making brunch. Obama has drafted something or other to try and get it put in place but it has to go to both Houses within 30 days for a vote within 90 days, and Clinton & Trump have come out against it because job losses n stuff, plus some people saying they thought it was the cat’s pyjamas. Don’t care. Don’t like the sound of it. Sick of hearing about it.

      Reply
  3. Conspiratoor

     /  1st October 2016

    Colonel, you and I live in a parallel universe. Do you really think ‘a cultural change amongst those who are the criminally violent’ is a reality?

    A raid on a gang house by the armed offenders squad, who can no longer cover their faces and must knock for fear of alarming the children in the house, finds a place stinking with the smell of chemicals and a baby with soiled nappies in which the loving parents had hidden their meth stash. Or what was the small amount left after they had enjoyed the luxury of time to burn the rest in the fireplace

    Reply
  4. Zedd

     /  1st October 2016

    sounds like Dr, Brash has not quite given up on ‘politics’ 😀

    I’m sure Drumpf & Hanson are on his ‘FAVS’ list ?? :/

    Reply
    • Pete Kane

       /  1st October 2016

      Don Brash compering beauty pageant – now that would be a treat.

      Reply
  5. Corky

     /  1st October 2016

    Casey Costello a Hobson’s Pledge member and part Maori, had a police service career. That I would presume is as a police woman. I would say she’d had a guts full of Maori bs and it was natural she’d become a Pledge member. Once you have had real life experience you either become a bleeding heart excuse monger for the most corrupt types of human behaviour. Or you decide to try and fix the problem like Casey Costello. Good luck girl, you will need it. Nothing like being called a kupapa.

    Reply
  6. The sooner we deny the truth of “Hobsons Pledge” the better. It was merely a statement made at the conclusion of the initial signing of the Treaty by some of the Rangitira of Iwi present before the treaty was taken around New Zealand for further commitment by other iwi rangitira. It was an observation that underlines his satisfaction with the surrender of sovereignty to the Queen. Do not ascribe any other meaning to his utterance else we go and fight other dragons, Peace people!

    Reply

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