Key’s secret

Key successfully kept his plans to resign secret,  by telling very few people.

According to reports:

  • Key had discussed the possibility of retiring with his wife Bronagh since last Christmas.
  • He told Bronagh about his decision in September.
  • He told Bill English just after that.
  • He told his children two weeks ago.
  • Close staff were told on Sunday.
  • Ministers were called individually, presumably on Monday morning.
  • National backbenchers were told by conference call 30 minutes before Key went public.

Limiting his secret like this enabled him to spring a surprise on the nation.

Inevitable leaks did occur, but just prior to Key’s announcement. Some people in politics can’t be trusted to keep their traps shut, and can’t be trusted to do the decent thing and let Key make his own announcement.

I’ve seen a couple of journalists say they were tipped off a few minutes before Key’s media meeting at 12:45 yesterday. But in general Key’s announcement caught media completely by surprise – they had no idea what the special press conference was about in advance.

Two people who I won’t name but who were closely associated with ‘Dirty Politics’ tried to grandstand, one via Twitter just before Key’s announcement – this was quickly removed – and one in a blog post. Their own egos are more important to them than  doing the decent thing and allowing Key to make his own announcement.

Until yesterday Key and those he trusted did very well to keep his secret.

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18 Comments

  1. Ray

     /  6th December 2016

    That is really interesting, apart from some or one backbencher the people he trusted could be trusted.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  6th December 2016

      Actually it also shows the ones he didn’t trust couldn’t be trusted.

  2. duperez

     /  6th December 2016

    There’s a touch of the old-fashioned in “doing the decent thing” and allowing Key to make his own announcement. A touch of what used to be called “integrity.” A touch of what integrity used to be.

    Which I find ironic is that past notions and traditions have demonstrably gone by the wayside and being bound by some sorts of old codes dissipated. That certainly in the realm of the Key Government.

    It’s all a bit like “let’s get rid of the ties to Mother England with the flag but let’s reintroduce their honours system.”

    A bit like having your cake and eating it too.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  6th December 2016

      Well, who wouldn’t rather be Sir or Dame than have three letters that mean nothing outside NZ /

      • Gezza

         /  6th December 2016

        Richie McCaw.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  6th December 2016

          More fool he.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  6th December 2016

            I hope that you were impressed by the dog’s poem. I believe that he will be widely recgnised as an innovative new voice inspired by a past genre.

          • Gezza

             /  6th December 2016

            More integrity he, you probably meant to say?

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  7th December 2016

          No. But I wouldn’t have knighted a rugby player anyway.

  3. Klik Bate

     /  6th December 2016

    @ 12.33pm

    When John Tamahere was just asked by Willie Jackson on Radio-Live what he believed the reason for JK’s sudden resignation was, he gave a one word answer: “MALARKEY”

    That’s something I have never heard before….assume it must have a ‘Maori’ meaning perhaps ❓

    • Gezza

       /  6th December 2016

      That would be maraki – referring to malachi, final book in the old testament.

      Wayne’s mum would probably know for sure what he meant.

      • Gezza

         /  6th December 2016

        Actually, I’m surprised you didn’t know that, Klik. Are you a heathen?

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  6th December 2016

          Malarkey doesn’t make a lot of sense here; it means nonsense, bunkum-‘a load of malarkey’, the sort of thing that Wayne and Wayne’s mum talk.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  6th December 2016

            It’s a very old word-1920s, I believe.

            • Klik Bate

               /  6th December 2016

              Given the confusion, thought it best to look it up in the dictionary for the definitive answer.

              MALARKEY [Irish – American 1929]. ‘…a word used by white men to describe things of an untasteful nature’

              Beats me why Tamahere would use it then ❓

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  7th December 2016

              The usual definition is nonsense, bunkum, humbug-that sort of thing. Which dicker had that ? The Oxford English Dictionary has nonsense and humbug, I think, but bunkum has been used as a synonym. Nowhere have I seen a definition remotely resembling the one you give, or heard it used as that. I have usually heard ‘a load of/lot of malarkey.’ Why white men ? How does the person know that black women (and white women) don’t say it ?

  4. Tin foil hats sheeple

    • Gezza

       /  6th December 2016

      That IDIOT ! If he’s right, the Defence Department will be in on it UP TO THEIR NECKS!