Boxing Day mauls

It used to be that commercialism urged people to spend up large for Christmas, and then everyone had a break after the 25th December.

If anything now commercialism cranks up a notch on Boxing Day – it actually starts before that with Boxing Day Sale advertising starting in Christmas Eve.

Shopping on Boxing Day isn’t a sin, although Jesus might describe our ongoing commercial onslaught as a din of thieves.

I went shopping on Boxing Day a few years ago, I wanted a lawnmower and I had the time to research the market and get a good Deal. But generally I avoid the madness of one of the busiest shopping days of the year, at the very time I am looking to relax and enjoy a break.

Boxing Day sales are likely to last a few days, and then will morph into New Year sales, which will morph into the same thing under a different name..

A decade or three ago a sale used to be an actual annual event, or perhaps one of two or three – annual sales and stock sales were the usual ones. I saw someone advertising a stock take sale for now – who does a stock take at this time of year?

With many things I wouldn’t consider buying them unless they were ‘on sale’, when they are not discounted 50-60% you pay to much, like double their market price at places like Briscoes.  But for big ticket items like appliances (and lawn mowers) even when they are not ‘on sale’ you can negotiate the prices down to virtual sale prices anyway. Kiwis have been pushed into haggling.

We all have to shop for stuff. The problem is when people are encouraged to but things they don’t need. We tend to buy too much junk, too many clothes, too much highly processed food that helps supply the diet industry with more customers and revenue.

Of course it is our choice if we go shopping and if we buy stuff we don’t need or we overindulge with.

But the increasing commercial onslaught drives more and more consumption resulting in more and more waste, and for those who can’t resist the pressure sales more and more health and financial problems.

The ‘shopping therapy’ will be out in force today.

I won’t be going anywhere near a shop, we have enough Christmas food in the fridge to last us a few days so can survive at home, or wherever we head in the opposite direction to the malls and mauls.

But as a society we are likely to continue to respond to commercialism with overspending and overloading our planet with over processed products made from overexploited resources.

Leave a comment

10 Comments

  1. A young shop assistant told me that retail staff hate Boxing Day, not because of the extra work but because of the huge number of gift returns and general unpleasantness of too many people who want to re-haggle the conditions of sale, i.e. swaps vs cashback.

    Reply
    • “re-haggle the conditions of sale”

      – because things they bought at a premium before Christmas are now on sale?

      Reply
      • Quite possibly. Her specific examples were so many gift returns and people just wanting cash to buy other stuff.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  26th December 2016

          They are under no obligation to give a refund unless the thing is faulty; if you don’t happen to like it, that’s your hard luck. Perhaps shops should put up huge notices saying that no refunds will be given unless the goods are faulty. I can’t remember how long Boxing Day sales have been going on-probably longer than we think. 🙂

          Reply
          • patupaiarehe

             /  26th December 2016

            Everyone thinks they are getting ‘a bargain’ on boxing day Kitty. The ugly truth is, that ‘The Warehouse’ are still making a profit….

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  26th December 2016

              There’s nothing ugly about making a profit; businesses have to. How do you think that they pay the wages and other costs ? They don’t want to only just cover costs, that would be pointless & no business could survive that way. I do object to inflated prices….but I don’t have to go to a place if I think that their prices are exorbitant,

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  26th December 2016

              No shop is legally obliged to give a refund because someone doesn’t like something that they’ve been given. I am amazed that people have the gall to ask for one; I wouldn’t want to embarrass myself by doing this.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  26th December 2016

              Nice to see you up at this hour Kitty 😀 I’m hoping that you are ready for a little intelligent conversation. Avoid the ‘CapsLock’ key please, some crazy Wellingtonian has already got ‘Lurchy’ on it… 😉

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  27th December 2016

              YES, ALL RIGHT. THANK YOU FOR THE ADVICE, I DON’T WANT TO LOOK LIKE LURCH !!!

  2. Kitty Catkin

     /  27th December 2016

    The people who crowd places like The Warehouse and Briscoe’s can’t have heard of ordering things online. I do this fairly often; the modest delivery fee is more than compensated for by not having to go in to town and carry the things home myself. My new dustbin came this way, as well as a bulk order of other, boring things like loo rolls, tissues and soap powder. Bunning’s delivery fee is exorbitant-what a turn-off.

    Reply

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