Waitangi Day

Waitangi was the first place inn which the Treaty of Waitangi was signed, beginning on 6 February 1840. It took until September to complete the signing as the treaty was taken around the country. Over 500 Maori signed it – and just the one non-Maori, on behalf of the Queen of England.

However you do Waitangi Day have a good one.

57 Comments

  1. lurcher1948

     /  February 6, 2017

    No koha to be paid to go in there??? did you have to pay 10k to watch the GG speak..oops no thats the bottom marae, where the [deleted] hang out

  2. lurcher1948

     /  February 6, 2017

    Saying it as i see it PG ps folks it was a non PC word,not abusive or racist, think people who could work,but sit around and get paid to do it and its not called lucky

    • lurcher1948

       /  February 6, 2017

      PG thanks for posting fair and but firm,hope you are enjoying your break…

  3. lurcher1948

     /  February 6, 2017

    Funny enough i have been there at the marae looked at the canoes been in the treaty house.

    • PDB

       /  February 6, 2017

      Good socks too!

      • Gezza

         /  February 6, 2017

        Yup. Colour-coordinated. Looking good for the election.
        Mind you, Andy was wearing a very sharp colour co-odinated chapeau at Waitangi on telly last night. The competiition this year might extend into the sartorial as well, pants. 😳

      • Anonymous Coward

         /  February 6, 2017

        You’d have thought he’d get some ‘big boy’ socks to go with his new ‘big boy’ job. Those socks are from the children’s section at Farmers.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  February 6, 2017

      Not a lot of women in the front rows are there? Where is the outrage?

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  February 6, 2017

        No, not necessarily, AC. I have some like that, and so did my late husband (still not used to saying that) They are lovely cotton ones with coloured toes and heels. Ours had the days of the week on them in the same colour (this may have been why they were on special :D) But the socks are great quality & makes one see why people pay good money for such things (the original price was much more than I have ever paid for socks) And they make a surprising difference to the comfort of one’s feet. And I like knowing that my conservative black sox have lovely coloured heels and toes.

  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  February 6, 2017

    I know it’s Waitangi day whenever I look out the window and see the ugliest naval vessel in human history, HMNZS Canterbury, moored in the Bay. I’ll never forgive the Clark government for naming an abomination designed by a drunken Aussie accountant after my home province.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  February 6, 2017

    • Kimbo

       /  February 6, 2017

      Yeah, but Canterbury is the province most likely to secede from the Union, so it seems only fair her disloyalty is punished by having a floating beer fridge named in her ‘honour’!

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  February 6, 2017

        Despite the great Alpine Fault earthquakes Canterbury is in no danger of floating away.

        However I do treasure your accurate description of this naval architectural atrocity as a floating beer fridge and will plagiarise it in future at every opportunity.

        • Kimbo

           /  February 6, 2017

          Please do so, and consider it this native-of-Otago’s revenge on you Sassenachs for that bloody 1994 “last minute David Latta penalty” Ranfurly Shield game at Lancaster Park.

          Which also seems an opportune moment to point out that, after the Achilles, HMNZS Otago is the most well-known in the RNZ Navy hall of fame. And she was despatched to Mururoa by a a PM born in Canterbury (well, Waimate – just north of the Waitaki),

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  February 6, 2017

            There we are, big Norm gave our little brother province a decent wave farewell and a respectable ship to voyage in whereas our deadly enemy Auckland’s PM gave us this insult to aesthetics and seaworthyness to flounder around the coast as a laughing stock.

            • Gezza

               /  February 6, 2017

              I feel your pain, Sir Alan. It looks like something designed by an entire convention of bureaucrats.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  February 6, 2017

              It’s the worst trick Aussie has ever played on us, G. Underarm doesn’t compare. And the Lefties fell for it and must be forever shamed.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  February 6, 2017

              Oh dear, the floating beer fridge just opened a 21 bottle salute at midday here. Dogs not impressed. The Gov G must be here.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  February 6, 2017

        To me, it looks like the bucket or scoop or whatever it is on a digger.

        How does it not tip over ?

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  February 6, 2017

          It’s not seaworthy. It has all sorts of problems. It’s not the first terrible NZ navy ship purchase but it sure is the ugliest.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  February 6, 2017

            I know nothing about such things, but it looks to me as if it would not be ideal. Its proportions look as if they are out, somehow.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  February 6, 2017

            Don’t you think that it looks like a digger scoop/bucket ? It even has the hinge.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  February 6, 2017

              Except that a digger scoop/bucket looks fit for purpose, Kitty, and this looks anything but. I’d hate to be in it in bad weather.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  February 6, 2017

              I wonder that the sailors are willing to stand at the front….OOOPS !

      • God peaceniks protesting Nuclear weapons are retards. The West wouldn’t still exist without the Bomb – the USSR conventional weapons advantage at the end of 1945 was too great for the West to resist for long.

        Retards protesting the very thing that allows them the right of free speech…. just idiots.

        • Anonymous Coward

           /  February 6, 2017

          Even if you can really justify the first use of the bomb, the second use was unnecessary and the damage we saw them do to generations of innocent people makes their use again unconscionable.

          • Oh please – are you going to argue Hiroshima and Nagasaki?

            The Japanese high command didn’t surrender and copped a second bomb.

            It wasn’t unnecessary at all. Saved thousands and thousands and thousands of lives i n 1945…

            And set an example that no one ever wants to see again.

            MAD is probably the greatest peace doctrine of all time and the idiots with their posters in London want to do away with the UK’s contribution. They are most certainly idiots.

            • Anonymous Coward

               /  February 6, 2017

              So given the choice between losing, fighting longer and fighting dirty, you choose fighting dirty. Got it.

            • I choose the choice that ends the fight quickly with the minimum loss of life. Pretty simple and clear choice. Strike hard and end it quickly

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  February 6, 2017

              Better put that in the context of Japan’s dirty fighting, AC.

            • Al… why waste you time on people who don’t understand the concept of limiting casualties by using overwhelming force and also have never heard of Nanking or Bataan, so don’t understand the way the Japanese prosecuted war…

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  February 6, 2017

              That doesn’t justify Hiroshima and Nagasaki. I read a description of what it was like after the first one-things like a woman with her lower jaw gone and her tongue hanging down among other things. Please let her not have lived too long with those injuries.

            • Kitty. I wish they had never used the A Bomb.

              But given the nature of the war that would have been fought on Mainland Japan, the use of the bomb was justified.

              Okinawa was just a foretaste of the strategy that would have been used by the Japanese on the four main islands..

              The use of the A Bomb spared millions of people from the possibility of nasty gruesome deaths.

              The firebombing of the major Japanese cities that was in progress when Hiroshima was bombed would have been escalated.

              The number of non combatants who died in the firestorms generated by US Bombers was multiples of those that died in Hiroshima and Nagasaki – and that number would have been multiplied many times over if the Japanese had not surrender following the the two A Bomb strikes.

              Then the invasion would have proceeded – and that doesn’t bare thinking about.

              Playing the emotion card, as you do in your reply, shows the true lack of understanding of the situation in 1945…

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  February 6, 2017

              During the Pacific War, Japanese soldiers killed millions of non-combatants, including prisoners of war, from surrounding nations.[176] At least 20 million Chinese died during the Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945)

              The Americans believed they could suffer a million casualties from invading Japan to force surrender and inflict an even greater number on the Japanese. In comparison, 129,000 Japanese are estimated to have been killed by the two bombs.

            • Gezza

               /  February 6, 2017

              I agree with dave & Alan on the first use of the A-bomb, for the reasons stated, but Nagasaki was unnecessary & an experiment, & the concurrent Russian invasion of Manchuria is frequently cited by some researchers as a final factor in the Emperor’s decision to tell his people the unendurable must be endured, and to cease all resistance. That, and the extreme level of unquestionning devotion and obedience to him & his divine leadership were all that saved him from the gallows.

              The long-term after-effects of fallout & radiation poisoning were not fully realised or understood when Little Boy & Fat Man were dropped.

              As regards protests against nuclear weapons, may they continue & spread to all countries. They are a constant reminder to governments how their people feel about anybody who wants to threaten with, or use them that they are a great, great evil which, now they exist, must never be allowed to be useable without reciprocation by any one power. Until such time as everybody can find a way to get rid of them forever. Imo.

            • Gezza – yes Russian invasion of the occupied territories of Manchuria may have had the impact you postulate. BUT when the decision to drop the second bomb was made the Japanese High Command had NOT surrendered to the Allies even after seeing the devastation in Hiroshima.

              The second bombing decision will always be second guessed and will be increasingly vilified as time dullest the conditions it was made under – those conditions: Deaths of hundreds of thousands of Allied troops in Asia, knowledge of the inhuman treatment of Allied prisoners, pressure to end the war “bring the boys home”, the calculations of battle planners on what an invasion would mean for the Allies in casualties and what it wold mean for the Japanese civilian population. PLUS the growing fear of a split in the Allied camp – the West versus the USSR.

              All the factors meant the right decision was made to bomb Nagasaki. The price Japan paid means NO ONE has had to pay the Nuclear bomb dividend ever again. Ultimately Trumans decision saved a huge number of lifes both in 1945 and the subsequent decades…

              As for the peace protesters – one of the most successful Soviet tactics is still paying dividends. They lost the economic struggle but the cultural seeds they planted have almost completely incapacitated Western fighting spirit…

            • Gezza

               /  February 7, 2017

              I disagree with your last sentence I think dave. The peaceniks who condemn nuclear weapons won’t ever succeed in achieving a unilateral nuclear disarmament only in the West, because there are far too many level-headed people who simply won’t let them. And if seriously threatened conventionally, they’d also fight – look at the Falklands. Otherwise – good post. 👍

            • Anonymous Coward

               /  February 7, 2017

              Now that that’s done it’s worth pointing out that the posters weren’t protesting nuclear weapons as such, just pointing out an hypocrisy in that launching a trident missile from a submarine is a “suicide bomber” mission.

            • Semantics – the underlying principle is Nuclear weapons bad AC… nice try though.

              And frankly given the numbers of people killed recently around the world by real suicide bombers the ad was in incredibly poor taste.

            • Anonymous Coward

               /  February 7, 2017

              Not semantics at all, that is what the story was about.

  5. lurcher1948

     /  February 6, 2017

    Yesterday the police acted as private security for the lower marae pushing the public up the road…SAD.The police image is getting worse in my view which is worth as much as the next person.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  February 6, 2017

      That’s me in the far, far distant background, Lurch. Hanging out the laundry up on the hill.

      See that blue stuff up the top, G? That’s what a sky should look like.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  February 6, 2017

        I see you ! You’re on the right, by the policeman’s hat.I hope that those frillies aren’t yours.

        That’s not Trump walking away, is it ? Beside a sign and between two policemen and the single one on the far right.

        The sky’s that colour here, too, it’s 34o outside. The gravel was hot enough to burn my feet-seriously-I can still feel it. If I’d stood around much longer, I would probably be wishing that I hadn’t. It’s like the Wanganui beaches when I was little, people would take giant strides over the sand.

      • Gezza

         /  February 6, 2017

        Thanks for the reminder about blue skies, Al. Had a couple of nice sunny days in a row with mostly blue skies, a few white puffs of cloud, and reasonably gentle sea breezes keeping the temps very pleasantly warm while the LF was here, so two walks in parks to enjoy them, & lots of pleasant conversation with the odd bit of Blue Sky Thinking.

        Back to grey skies & blustery Norwesters today. 😕

        Am trying to establish exactly who is accountable for this rubbish weather. 😡

    • Yes patupaiarehe, Tommy Kapai’s opinion is a useful ingredient in the mix. I believe “compulsory te reo” will be a long-running discussion.

      I think he’s overlooked a couple of ‘elephant in the room’ compulsory things though, namely schooling itself and English … [although there are others too, ‘orthodox medicine’ and ‘patriotism’ in wartime for instance]

      How does it feel if I reword a paragraph of his writing thus –

      “Compulsory voting, sex education, military training and religion are all red rags to the free-range Kiwi roaming around in our own backyard – if they’re lucky enough to own one or have retained their land – and, while we don’t actually have any of those things, we have always reacted poorly to anything obligatory or mandatory, with the notable exceptions of compulsory [State] schooling itself and its attendant compulsory English language … [plus orthodox medicine and patriotism during wartime] …

      By making both Schooling & English compulsory we could well have turned off more than we turn on? [I arrive (loosely) at “more” by adding together those for whom ‘School’ itself is an unsuitable environment for learning, growth and nurture, and those for whom Te Reo or some other language apart from English is their first language …]

      • patupaiarehe

         /  February 6, 2017

        How does it feel PZ? It feels like you’re being silly. Like it or not, English is understood by pretty much everyone in this country, so should be compulsory, as one needs it to communicate. That said, IMHO every resident of this country should be given the opportunity to learn ‘Te Reo’, free of charge, IF THEY WANT TO.

  6. Brown

     /  February 6, 2017

    Had the day off and took wife and dog to Gladstone pub for lunch. Great place. Dog shared my burger and had a swim in the adjacent river within an hour of eating. Tut tut.