Government can’t be run like his business

It has been obvious that Donald Trump has been struggling with things like the concept of government and separation of powers.

Some business practices can be successfully applied to governing, but some can’t. Becoming president doesn’t equate to being owner of a business – you become responsible for many organisations and businesses with many competing interests.

Politico: Trump vexed by challenges, scale of government

The new president’s allies say he has been surprised that government can’t be run like his business.

Being president is harder than Donald Trump thought, according to aides and allies who say that he’s growing increasingly frustrated with the challenges of running the massive federal bureaucracy.

In interviews, nearly two dozen people who’ve spent time with Trump in the three weeks since his inauguration said that his mood has careened between surprise and anger as he’s faced the predictable realities of governing, from congressional delays over his cabinet nominations and legal fights holding up his aggressive initiatives to staff in-fighting and leaks.

The administration’s rocky opening days have been a setback for a president who, as a billionaire businessman, sold himself to voters as being uniquely qualified to fix what ailed the nation. Yet it has become apparent, say those close to the president, most of whom requested anonymity to describe the inner workings of the White House, that the transition from overseeing a family business to running the country has been tough on him.

Trump often asks simple questions about policies, proposals and personnel. And, when discussions get bogged down in details, the president has been known to quickly change the subject — to “seem in control at all times,” one senior government official said — or direct questions about details to his chief strategist Steve Bannon, his son-in-law Jared Kushner or House Speaker Paul Ryan.

Trump has privately expressed disbelief over the ability of judges, bureaucrats or lawmakers to delay — or even stop — him from filling positions and implementing policies.

Did no one try to explain to him how being President worked? It’s far different to being president of a company. Perhaps someone tried and he wasn’t interested in listening. There was always a big dollop of naivety apparent with Trump.

For all his frustrations, Trump has reveled in the trappings of the presidency. He has taken a liking to the Oval Office, where he spends much of his time working. Following a recent gathering of business leaders, he brought the group into the storied room and showed them around.

But he has also sought refuge from the pressures of the presidency, frequently calling up old friends and sounding them out about golf.

So what happens if he gets too frustrated with the job? Will he bankrupt the country and start another one up?

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34 Comments

  1. Noel

     /  February 11, 2017

    Those executive commands are overrated.
    I can’t understand how people expect them to go forward without challenge.
    When Obama first took command one of his was the closure of Guantanamo.
    Yeah right!

    Reply
  2. Well, the Donald is just going to raise another on Mon or Tuesday apparently Noel. 😉

    “….new president’s allies say…” Sure they do and sure they’re his allies.

    I take all these reports with a grain of salt. He may well be easily bored and not up with govt procedure and play, but he’s still the POTUS and I believe that rumours of his demise, at this stage, are not only predictable but premature.

    Need to remember the very reason people voted him was that he wasn’t beltway, and that a very vocal and well-funded machine is trying to bring him down.

    Good luck with that. Billionaires roll with the punches, even egotistical ones, and they’ll try any method they can to get an outcome they desire. Can’t wait to see the confusion as he brings out a further security executive order next week.

    Can’t wait to tune into Seanie’s press briefings next week.

    Reply
  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  February 11, 2017

    Given the ability of his opponents to stall anything in their favourite Lefty West Coast Ninth Circuit courts where two thirds of the judges have been appointed by Democrats, Trump will have to focus on getting the Supreme Court stacked with his own nominees to override them.

    That will delay everything for at least a couple of months so he may as well spend it playing golf with foreign leaders and showing business people around the White House. His staff can spend it boning up on the ethics laws and preparing a new batch of Executive Orders for when the Supreme Court is fixed.

    Reply
  4. David

     /  February 11, 2017

    STOP READING POLITICO, its a Hillary, Democrat elitist Daily Blog with zero balance. Of course Trump is a business man but has loads of experience with how awful it is to deal with governments because he has to deal with them every day to run his business. Thats why he was voted in because globally its about bloody time government is run by people who know how awful government is and things need to change.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  February 11, 2017

      Garbled statement of the year, possibly of the century.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  February 11, 2017

      They HAVE voted people in who *know how awful government is & things need to change* David. It turns out that it’s not like just running a family business & a reality tv show & they’re screwing up all over the place because at the moment they’re being very stupid at it – especially the big orange guy with the white mink on his head & the addiction to twittering.

      They showed on the teev last night on 1Ewes. What in God’s name is he doing with his hair? It’s a national scandal 😡

      Reply
      • GEZZA, calm down old son, your language is ad hominem, and getting close to being racsist with the “big orange guy with the white mink comment”. Manners please

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  February 11, 2017

          They’re just sort of Generalisations, Bj. Yours are kind of Colonelisations, though a good read sometimes, if a little on the harsh side occasionally. Shocked at your suggestion the Sallies charitable status should be reviewed. Thought it was going way beyond the pale tbh.

          Dreading putting on The TV News. Painful to watch all the trivia that fills even the first half hour. Gonna make myself do it though. Might be ok. Save the whales.

          Reply
          • Gezza, you assume too much about my position. To be clear, I will always oppose charitable status to any organisation that is politicised. That is why I have never joined a political party, and why I do not contribute to Greenpeace or any other such organisations despite my commitment to preservation of the environment. We need more research on why Pilot Whales beach themselves, before we can provide an answer to the habit they have displayed nearly every year of the last 75 plus years in my memory. Good luck to those who are dedicated and fit enough to spend time trying to resuscitate fellow mammals, I did my bit with dolphins on East Beach at Hohoura Heads mumble years ago. (Successful).

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  February 11, 2017

              Well, it’s just as well you’re not in charge of making the decisions on what constitutes a charity. The Sallies, as conspiratoor so eloquently but concisely pointed out, are the last hope & refuge of many of our most desperate people. I know someone who availed herself of their generosity, compassion, resources, & resourcefulness at the lowest point of her life & they very likely saved her life. So poo to you boo bo on that one.

              But good on you for saving the dolphins. Four major stranding piints for pilot whales around New Zealand, Farewell Spit being the worst. Pretty good theory that the gently sloping sandy beaches beggaring up their sonar & making them unaware they are heading the wrong way, plus their strong social bonds, is the most likely cause of these natural tragedies, I’m inclined to go with. Yet another of God’s major design flaws in creatures & topography, adding to the piles of other evidence an interventionist Abrahamic God’s not real.

              They trap & cruelly slaughter these poor creatures every year in the shallows in Iceland, you know.

      • David

         /  February 11, 2017

        Aside from having his travel ban halted by the courts, a policy opposed by 20% of the population, what has he done that has you unhinged and scared.
        As a frequent US visitor its a common theme of how appalling the US government is and that is why he won the election. We live in paradise Gezza and Kitty Katin and if you are not convinced google what you need to do to open a florist or a nail bar, then have a look at how Warren Buffett pays a lower marginal tax rate than his PA. Trump was elected to get the economy humming and look at the Dow, s performance where real money gives you an indication, sure he wants to protect the border too but so does most of Americans.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  February 11, 2017

          Yes, yes i know all that David. I would have voted for him myself because his & others’ (including wikileaks’s) endless slagging off of Hillers convinced me she was a BAD MAMA. But it would have been with the hope that he would behave like a businesslike president once elected. Not like bozo the bloody clown with a twitter account. He’s acting like a total bloody wally surrounded by shitheads. Why do you think his adminstration is leaking like a bloody sieve?

          Reply
  5. Kitty Catkin

     /  February 11, 2017

    I have been saying this about government/business for a long time, and I can’t believe that I am alone in thinking that he imagined that being the boss of a business and being the president were the same.

    ‘Too much ticklee, him bust.’

    Reply
  6. I look forward to seeing how many of the elements I suggested the other day will be included in his revised direction. I also wonder how many of our readers have seen the Democratic Plan for Action see http://www.jimstone.is/mediawar/1.html. The extent and detail of this plan seems to be too detailed to be dismissed as “false news”, and the names involved in the whole circumstantial evidence have a huge stench to them. In simple terms, what we are seeing is a rejection of a legitimate election result by Democrats with big money at their call to impugne the legitimacy of the President. Their use of Democrat appointed Judiciary who have a majority to oppose the decisions of the Executive is illegitimate in Constitutional terms, and will erode the Presidential authority to live up to his Oath of Office. Our (NZ) highest Court is Parliament and this ensures that Government must follow the will of the people, not a member of a political party who has been appointed to a judicial position. There is an awful lot at stake here for all Democracies. Ideologies can never rule, the people must!

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  February 11, 2017

      The whole situation with executive orders is messy & always has been from what I’ve read, on wikipedia I think. Best to leave it up to the US Courts to determine what is illegitimate in Constitutional terms. With respect, they are probably better qualified than you to make those determinations. It is also as well to remember that this particular president has some decidedly dodgy attitudes to nepotism & business interests, and these don’t engender reverence for the office for many. Business interests of the rich – oligarchies – must also never rule. I’m sure you would agree?

      Re the will of the people, this is somewhat complicated by 10 million more voters than wanted him not wanting him as their president, and by his outrageous bullshitting, whic has been going on for two years & seems to be getting worse, not better.

      I hope you have managed to reacquire your sense of humour. Nice to have an exchange of views. I always read yours & think about them.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  February 11, 2017

        B.s. seems to be catching: Clinton received about 2.9 million more votes nationwide, a margin of 2.1%, Trump won with 56% of electors in the Electoral College, winning 30 states https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_2016

        To get your 10M you’ll have to count don’t care third party votes or non-voters.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  February 11, 2017

          l thought I read somewhere this year that there were 7 million who voted for the Greens & other smaller parties Al. I think it is bad form for you to characterise those as don’t care voters because they clearly cared enough not want either Clinton or Trump. I put it to that you are guilty of unjustifiable dichotomous thinking for reasons we don’t need to go into because they are irrelevant & would just be another of your famous diversions.

          It’s possible the figure I heard or saw was 7 million all up, & not 7 + 3 (rounded).

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  February 11, 2017

            If they didn’t care enough to vote for a candidate that had a chance of winning they didn’t care who won.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  February 11, 2017

              They didn’t want El Trumpo or they would have voted for him. Thank you & good night on this one. You’ve been a wonderful audience.

            • Anonymous Coward

               /  February 11, 2017

              8 259 870 votes for ‘other’ candidates combined
              2 868 519 more votes to Hillary
              74 113 495 Total votes NOT for trump
              62 985 106 votes FOR Trump

              Gezza’s 10M is actually 11 128 389

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  February 11, 2017

              So you got the wrong total for the wrong calculation, G. Other than that, he’s a more prolific bullshitter than you, but you’ve got as much sticking power attached to crap, I concede.

            • Gezza

               /  February 11, 2017

              I leave it to my staff to work out the details Alan. AC & Joe are extremely talented in these areas & it frees me up to be the visionary sort of commenter who knows when he’s right.

            • Joe Bloggs

               /  February 12, 2017

              This crap about 10m versus 11.1m is diversionary nitpicking nevertheless it highlights one of the 3 major flaws in the electoral college system. Trump received 46% of the popular vote and that gave him 56% of the elector vote in the Electoral College. So there’s a disconnect between the popular vote and the electoral college vote.

              Trump won very narrowly in large states such as Florida, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, but gained all their electoral votes in the process, turning the loss of the popular vote into an electoral college landslide.

              That may be legitimate under US electoral laws, but is hardly representative of a democratic system…. but then the US has never really been a democracy.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  February 12, 2017

              These has been explained multiple times before, Joe. The US is a federation of states with limited powers ceded to the Federal Government and by default all other powers belong to the states. This is why the states elect the president so it counts the same whether a state votes overwhelmingly or narrowly for a particular candidate. Trump won far more states than Clinton but Clinton won the big states with huge majorities in them. It’s an FPP electorate system. The big cities vote Democrat but small ones and towns and country vote Republican. Although the big cities have been growing so have all the other smaller towns pretty much in the same proportion.

    • Joe Bloggs

       /  February 12, 2017

      @BJ, it’s a little disturbing that you attribute political motivation to the 9th Circuit’s decision with no factual support for such a conclusion.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  February 12, 2017

        The 9th Circuit is regarded as the most left-wing in the country, 2/3rds of its judges are Democrat appointees and its decisions are the most frequently overturned by the Supreme Court.

        Reply
      • Three Judges all appointed by Democratic Presidents and Bush? Too naive Joe! Please don’t be disturbed, just disagree with my comments, I mean no harm.

        Reply
    • Jeeves

       /  February 13, 2017

      How can it be a legitimate election result when the winner himself claims it was rigged and there were millions of votes cast illegally.
      Or is he bulshitting again?
      – is this just yet another illegitimate comment? How many illegitimate comments can you make before you become functionally illegitimate yourself?

      Reply

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