Record high immigration/returning Kiwis

The number of people coming to New Zealand hit a new high in January, although this was mainly due to returning New Zealanders rather than new immigrants.

RNZ: Migrant numbers hit new record high as NZers return

Official figures show more than 71,300 people settled here in the year to January, beating the previous annual record set a month earlier by 700.

The January month also set a new high of 6460 – the fifth successive month net migration has exceeded 6000.

Migrant arrivals hit an all-time high of 128,300 in the January 2017 year, with about a third of the total being on work visas, while returning New Zealanders also figured prominently.

“The strength of our labour market and general economic outlook are key influences,” Westpac Bank senior economist Satish Ranchhod said.

That’s a good sign for our economy, but it is likely to put even more pressure on housing.

Not everything is on the rise.

More stringent student visa requirements in the wake of abuse of English language requirements and fraudulent applications have made a dent in numbers, falling 13 percent to 24,300 for the year.

But that was made up for by returning Kiwis.

“About a fifth of all migrant arrivals were from Australia,” Statistics New Zealand population statistics senior manager Peter Dolan said.

“Almost two-thirds of the migrant arrivals from Australia were New Zealand citizens.”

The Government can’t control the number of New Zealanders who want to return, but they have tried to reduce the number of new immigrants.

Last year, the government moved to reduce the number of new migrants, including raising the points needed in the skilled migrant category to 160 from 140, and more than halving the number of people allowed entry under the family category to 2000.

And tourist numbers also continue to rise.

The number of visitor arrivals rose to 381,100 in January and 3.54 million for the year, both record highs.

“The strong increase in visitor arrivals in January 2017 coincided with the Chinese New Year,” Mr Dolan said.

“Over 54,000 visitors from China arrived in New Zealand in January 2017.”

Half of the annual increase in tourist arrivals came from Australia, China and the United States.

And this is putting pressure on infrastructure in tourist areas as well as on tourist attractions.

 

28 Comments

  1. Pete Kane

     /  February 28, 2017

    Good Morning from a yet to be determined Capital City day Pete. “………but they have tried to reduce the number of new immigrants.” Really? Must say our Editor’s working overtime. 4 full articles and 6.18 am. Southern industriousness. (and I’ve only just looked in.)

    • I could say I read Sleeping longer than 9 hours could be a sign of dementia (and I did in part) but if I wake up I get up and get into it.

      This could be a sign of something else of course.

      • Pete Kane

         /  February 28, 2017

        Can report extreme mist, and the now quietning (and very tempting) sounding of the ducks in the Gardens. Birds seem to have a speaking que around here. Await official YNZ Ornithologist, Mr G’s report.

        • Pete Kane

           /  February 28, 2017

          Oh dear, spell checky thing.

        • Clear and unmisty here in Dunedin this morning, but it has been feeling more like autumn than summer lately.

          Talking of birds, I visited the Orokonui Ecosanctuary on Sunday.

          The takahe chicks are adult sized now but their beaks haven’t turned red yet.

          Not many kaka or tui around, plenty of bellbirds as usual. Got swooped over by a kereru.

          Saw a rifleman and also a couple of South Island robins, they are bigger than I thought they would be.

          And there are some very nice bush walks while taking all this in. A great place to visit, I’ve been there six or seven times since renewing my membership three months ago. Something different every time.

        • Nelly Smickers

           /  February 28, 2017

          Just a friendly reminder from Wayne…..*May 6* is also fast approaching 😎

          • Pete Kane

             /  February 28, 2017

            40 years ago Nel a chat like this would have immediately had mention of the Chinese Embassy opposite our Bot. Gardens (Glenmore St. side). Changing times.

            • Nelly Smickers

               /  February 28, 2017

              Even today PK, the locals around here call Western Springs ‘Little Peking’ 😡

            • Pete Kane

               /  February 28, 2017

              Chinese Embassy Open Day, Glenmore St., Kelburn, Wellington. (My very near neighbor as the duck flaps)

          • Pete Kane

             /  February 28, 2017

            Nel, sensitivity, ‘Little Beijing’ if you please!

          • NOEL

             /  February 28, 2017

            Oh shit. The local herons,kingfishers and seagulls are going to have to compete with the influx of immigrants down at the estuary.

  2. Pete Kane

     /  February 28, 2017

    Orokonui Ecosanctuary – private, public, both?

    • A non-profit trust but they use some sponsorship.

      Orokonui Ecosanctuary is a project of the Otago Natural History Trust (ONHT), a registered charitable trust. Otago Natural History Trust appoints a Board of directors, Orokonui Ecosanctuary Ltd, to manage the financial operation of the Ecosanctuary.

      Otago Natural History Trust has 1500 members, including individual, family, community group and corporate groups. A large team of volunteers support our staff.

      Our partners include the Department of Conservation, the University of Otago, Ministry of Education and Kati Huirapa Runaka ki Puketeraki.

      Our funders include the Department of Conservation, the Ministry of Education and many sponsors and donors.

      https://orokonui.nz/About/The-Trust

  3. “Migrant arrivals hit an all-time high of 128,300 in the January 2017 year, with about a third of the total being on work visas,”
    Two thirds then did not arrive for work, and as several independent observations at the statistics find: Migrants arriving here are not filling work shotages at all, and are often low skill
    ,a>Pete thinks they are ” good for the economy ” . You mean they raise GDP Pete? Is that what you mean by good ?
    Never mind the election is coming soon.

  4. I believe it will eventually become apparent that immigration is effectively a clause in the ‘terms & conditions’ of globalisation …

    You want our cheap manufactured products, cars, appliances, junk and $2 shop crap, or access to our cheap labour and resources … etc … you take our excess people in X, Y & Z numbers …

    In many cases “excess people” may mean those who can buy their way out of their country of origin … and also buy their way into Nouvelle ZeaL Landia … This accounts for many of them appearing ‘entreprenuerial’ …

    Their permeable-border entry contributions are another way we replace investment in productive industry [&/or regional development] along with, most obviously, their Real Estate acquisitions … upon which the NZ economy is now largely predicated (in addition to Kiwi Real Estate dealings) …

    Returning Kiwis probably fall into one or both of two categories … A) Those who have realized the ‘investment potential’ of the above situation – get in [buy in] now before the Real Estate is all gone or the bubble bursts – and B) those escaping faltering Australasian or Northern Hemisphere economies where this same situation is already worse or far worse than it is here … &/or escaping Trump …

    • Pete Kane

       /  February 28, 2017

      Isn’t it already PZ, well at least by our Govts. (plural) recent assumptions?

      • Absolutely Pete, when I speak of things like “the neoliberal paradigm” (a handy umbrella description) I am definitely refering to successive Labour and National governments since Lange/Douglas were elected and duplicitously turned ‘Left’ into ‘Right’ …

        • Pete Kane

           /  February 28, 2017

          Yep. 1984 to present has simply been a continuum PZ., with mitigating breaks from 96 to 98 and 99 to 02.

    • NOEL

       /  February 28, 2017

      “immigration is effectively a clause in the ‘terms & conditions’ of globalisation ”

      When negotiations were been conducted on the China Free Trade agreement one of asks on the China side was the ability to bring in their labour on jobs at their rates of pay.
      It didn’t make it into the final draft but it happened by stealth.

      Chinese engineers on the new trains and mandarin speaking restaurant workers been just a couple of examples. The galling part is the NZ taxpayer has fund Work NZ to investigate corrupt practices by foreign employers who are not employing New Zealanders.

    • NOEL

       /  February 28, 2017

      Certainly for Australia many returning Kiwis cite the down turn minerals and mining, the economy and the drive to reduce public services jobs started by the Abbott Government. Add to that the fact that they don’t have a safety net like we give to Australians who work here and the restrictive processes for residency it’s not surprising that many are returning.

  5. Auto_Immune

     /  February 28, 2017

    I beginning to think that National is being timid on cutting immigration numbers (in part) to have something to concede to NZFirst post-election. National knows they should be cutting numbers where they can, but can’t lose the immigrant vote. So they don’t bother really trying, until there’s some other party to blame.

    • Pete Kane

       /  February 28, 2017

      Agree AI. and Labour, as I say, has to share this also (equally).

    • NOEL

       /  February 28, 2017

      “but can’t lose the immigrant vote.”

      Go into a dentist and you could likely see a selfie with John Key when he was PM.
      Don’t know why it is but there are lot of people who have fled from countries with dictatorships and the like but are drawn to the NatZ when they become citizens here,

  6. duperez

     /  February 28, 2017

    Auckland will have the equivalent of the population of Dunedin added to it in the period 2015-2018.

    No surprise then about infrastructure problems. Are the improvements and developments evident now all just “running on the spot” because of the rate of growth? By the time new roading is completed will increased population mean that the roads will still be chocker?

    • Since that’s exactly what’s happened in my living memory duperez – through Nippon Clipons, Northern & Southern Mways, South-Western links, tunnels and extensions et al ad infinitum – there’s no reason to think the trend won’t continue unabated …