Maori king versus Nanaia Mahuta

King Tuheitia has endorsed one of his advisors to stand for the Maori Party in the Hauraki-Waikato electorate, which will put him up against Labour’s Nanaia Mahuta.

This is a significant challenge to Mahuta and Labour.

Stuff: King Tuheitia endorses Maori Party candidate and tells Labour MP Nanaia Mahuta to step aside

Labour MP and Maori stalwart Nanaia Mahuta says King Tuheitia’s influence over his people will be tested on election day when those in the Hauraki-Waikato electorate cast their vote.

Mahuta’s shaking off the Maori King’s criticisms of her and his endorsement of Rahui Papa – one of the King’s advisors – for the Maori Party in her seat.

Tuheitia made the rare move of endorsing Papa at Parawera Marae, south of Hamilton, on Thursday.

He called for Mahuta, his cousin, to stand aside and let someone else represent the seat because she no longer has any “mana” in parliament.

Rare? I think this is unprecedented.

Mahuta seems to be virtually invisible in Parliament. Maori MPs often do a lot of work under the media radar in their electorates, but being so openly challenged in her home patch is a major challenge for Mahuta.

Mahuta has represented the electorate for more than 20 years but says she has never been “formally endorsed” by Kingitanga, the Maori King movement, and Thursday’s events were an “odd situation”.

Quite an odd situation.

56 Comments

  1. Kitty Catkin

     /  March 9, 2017

    I missed most of the news item-thank you for this. The ‘king’ is, er, not considered to be the Maori answer to Stephen Hawking (coff), so it will be interesting to see what his advisor’s like. Or maybe it won’t.

    • Sponge

       /  March 9, 2017

      Tuku Morgan has his hand up this fools arse and plays him like the complete and utter dummy he is.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  March 10, 2017

        Tsk, tsk, that’s a bit harsh. :-/ But he is no great intellectual to put it mildly, which is a pity. I may well be totally wrong, but my impression is that he’s a weakling who thinks that he’s not one-this is only an impression.

        You should have heard some of the conversations that I heard when Robert Mahuta forgot his anti-Pakeha feelings and accepted a knighthood. It was as if Gerry Adams had done this. I know some Tainui people 😀

  2. The Maori King and possibly Mahuta herself might see the way pakeha candidates are selected and endorsed in general electorates as “odd” …?

    Unlike Apirana Ngata and other Maori politicians of his generation – working from within Labour – with the advent of Mana Motuhake, Mana and the Maori Party, its no longer necessary for Maori to play the pakeha political party game …

    Pakeha are certain to find this challenging … like whanau or hapu vs ‘community’ … (despite the fact that whanau and hapu is a very identifiable form of community) …

    “In 2009 Mahuta’s Resource Management (Enhancement of Iwi Management Plans) Amendment Bill, which proposed giving more weight to Māori in resource-management decisions, was drawn from the members’ ballot. The bill was defeated at its first reading in August.”

    I wonder if this has anything to do with prevailing attitudes toward Mahuta from either pakeha or Maori …?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanaia_Mahuta

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  March 9, 2017

      It’s impossible to generalise about so many people-how many million Pakehas are there in NZ ? Is it likely that they think alike ? Do every Maori think like every other Maori ?

      Does it seem remotely reasonable that Maori farmers shoulf NOT have to fence off water to avoid pollution as Pakeha ones do ? Maori cows pollute as much as Pakeha ones do.

      If anyone had proposed that being Pakeha should give people greater rights in law than being Maori, it would rightly be called racist.

      • @ Miss Kitty – “Does it seem remotely reasonable that Maori farmers should NOT have to fence off water to avoid pollution as Pakeha ones do?”

        Where did you get the idea that Mahuta’s RMA Amendment Bill, or any other Maori initiative, meant they would be excused from fencing off waterways or other pollution control measures …?

        Please supply a link …

        • Pickled Possum

           /  March 9, 2017

          Hiya Parti 😉 Hope the rain thunder and lightening is over rover for you.
          I have long thought about the darkness of some minds;
          Deep into that darkness
          peering, long I stood there,
          wondering, fearing, doubting,
          dreaming dreams no mortal
          ever dared to dream before.
          E.A.POE

          • Possum taku hoa … Nice poem … “peering, long I stood” …

            “The very ink with which history is written is merely fluid prejudice”.

            – Mark Twain

            “I know we can’t abolish prejudice through laws, but we can set up guidelines for our actions by legislation.”

            – Belva Lockwood

            “I think most people are more susceptible to prejudice than to reason.”

            – Roger Ebert

            “Prejudice is a raft onto which the shipwrecked mind clambers and paddles to safety.”

            – Ben Hecht

            “Everyone is a prisoner of his own experiences. No one can eliminate prejudices – just recognize them.”

            – Edward R. Murrow

            Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/prejudice_6.html

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  March 10, 2017

          I can’t, but there is a lot of anger among Pakeha farmers locally that Maori farmers don’t have the same legal restrictions that Pakeha ones have, and they are determined to do something about this-I heard it from a farmer.

          • … or perhaps they just think or assume Maori farmers don’t have the same legal restrictions Miss Kitty …? Just because a farmer says it doesn’t mean its true … eh?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  March 11, 2017

              These people are not idiots, and they mmust have some reason for believing that there are two laws.

      • @ Miss Kitty – “It’s impossible to generalise about so many people …”

        Perhaps you shouldn’t generalise about the King or his advisor Rahui Papa either …?

        But you’re not really generalising are you? You are denigrating …

        • patupaiarehe

           /  March 9, 2017

          Perhaps you shouldn’t generalise yourself, PZ. I suspect that some ‘Maori’, don’t agree with ‘the King’.

          • That might be why I originally used the word “might” patu, as in “might see the way pakeha candidates are selected and endorsed in general electorates as “odd” …? The question mark is a dead giveaway too …

            Well known that Kingitanga is essentially a Tainui and Waikato movement …

            So I’m not saying people should agree with the King … but it seems to me the essential topic implied here is ‘The King’s Recommendation’ and that our Queen, for instance, would never do this because of our cherished separation of Church, Monarchy and State … or something like that …

            To use a blunt comparison, we also ‘cherish’ the separation of our children from family [whanau] at age 5 and increasingly younger … Our much vaunted and government subsidized Early Childhood Education …

            We “cut them loose” and send them to school with a whole bunch of strangers … regardless of whether they individually want to go or not … We remove them from their most likely social unit of protection … family …

            I can imagine this “might seem odd” to some people …?

            Kohanga reo got established and thrived due to the more-or-less exact reversal of this trend … by using local whanau, hapu and iwi connections and resources, kuia and matua, aunties and nanis on the marae – turangawaewae – to re-establish and weave together the broken bonds of culture and language …

            • patupaiarehe

               /  March 10, 2017

              We “cut them loose” and send them to school with a whole bunch of strangers … regardless of whether they individually want to go or not … We remove them from their most likely social unit of protection … family …

              We do PZ, but only for 6 hours/day. They then come home, & reflect upon the events of the day, around the dinner table. In my household, anyway. Any ‘issues’ that the younger ones have, are sorted out at school, by their older siblings, the following day.

            • Yeah … okay … so a quarter or 25% of their day, five seventh’s of their week …

              I’m sorry to say this, truly, because I know you’re a good man and I’m sure you’re a good parent patu … but your eldest child didn’t have older siblings to look out for him/her when he/she first started school, did he/she?

              And the older siblings “sorting out” the younger ones’ “issues” is a good education for what exactly?

              I’ve said it before and I’ll do so again: The problem with school is school itself. It’s an archaic Victorian factory model in dire need of re-designing … which is unlikely to happen while our economy remains largely a modified Victorian factory model …

              There’s some hope in self-directed digital learning I guess … and more home-based learning … provided it doesn’t completely replace human interactions …

              The greatest hope for school though resides in guided and facilitated learning ABOUT HUMAN INTERACTIONS …

          • Pickled Possum

             /  March 10, 2017

            @ patupaiarehe Yes you would be correct in sayin some Maori don’t agree with the King … but then some non-Maori don’t agree with Queen Liz in fact a lot don’t agree with her or her children or their hangers-on troughing ways.

            King Tuheitia has a job to do and he does it well, according to Waikato maori.
            To most non-maori understanding this is a hard task,considering the bias some have towards anything maori.
            Kingitanga was given life because of colonisation lies and deceit and the very thing maori was afraid of, was being made redundant in their own country.
            Now the non-maori are fighting their own repression of culture with the in-flux of different peoples. Dilution is the name of the game and only the Asians aren’t playing that game. Keeping to themselves with not that many interracial-marriages. Smart people.

            • GO POSSUM … you good thing !!!

              Karma in action …

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  March 10, 2017

              Not true for NZ-born Asians, Possum.
              They are almost twice as likely as Maori to have an interracial partner. Less than one third of them partner with another Asian:

              http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11532324

            • Corky

               /  March 10, 2017

              I can’t put my finger on it, but something seems wrong with those stats.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  March 10, 2017

              What I had noticed was the peculiarity of the Maori stats – the difference between the first and second tables can’t be explained by “NZ Born” distinction. So I assume it relates to the chart at the bottom showing a high proportion of Maori have mixed ethnicity which is confusing the questions.

            • Corky

               /  March 10, 2017

              That would explain it. I can’t think of any other explanation except for a mistake in the printed stats which is unlikely.

            • Those stats speak volumes, don’t they. Note especially the European figures in each case …

            • PDB

               /  March 10, 2017

              Says a lot about you actually PZ, none of it good……………a ‘European’ is already a huge mix of different cultures, nationalities and races.

            • Corky

               /  March 10, 2017

              Like a shark to blood, I wondered how long it’d be before you picked up the scent, Parti. The only good thing is you can’t blame these stats on neo-liberalism….or can you?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  March 10, 2017

              You are right, PZ. Europeans are the least prejudiced towards choosing a partner of the same ethnicity:

              Ethnicity Population Same Partner Ratio
              european 69.0% 95.0% 1.4
              asian 9.2% 30.5% 3.3
              pacific 6.9% 36.5% 5.3
              maori 14.6% 51.0% 3.5

            • Yes indeed Alan … Europeans have been or are also the least prejudiced towards –

              – Duplicitously stealing or forcibly taking Maori and indigenous peoples’ land
              – believing they’re superior to everybody else
              – Exploiting their own working classes
              – Exploiting third world labour and resources
              – prosecuting numerous wars on an enormous, mechanised scale
              – believing their Westminster system of politics is the zenith of political evolution
              – believing their neoliberal capitalist-austere welfare, globalised, financialised economic system is the pinnacle of human transactional development …
              – et al ad infinitum …

            • – polluting their environment …

              One might also say: Only Asian women are more prejudiced than European women towards having a partner of different ethnicity … followed closely by European men …

            • patupaiarehe

               /  March 10, 2017

              That ‘high horse’ of yours, deserves to be ‘kneecapped PZ. My single mate’s ‘student friend’, allegedly enjoys his company. A lot 😉 .Almost as much as he enjoys hers…

            • patupaiarehe

               /  March 10, 2017

              Anyhow, I’m off to bed, gotta work tomorrow….

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  March 11, 2017

              You would say that, PZ, but you ignore the choice available to them. Most Asian women in NZ probably chose their partner while living in an Asian country and European immigrant similarly. You have to factor in what random choice would look like before you can identify possible prejudice or preference.

            • There’s no “high horse” about that patu … and I acknowledge I may be high-horse at times … Its simple logic …

              If as Alan so scrupulously says, “Europeans are the least prejudiced towards choosing a partner of the same ethnicity” … (This, IMHO, is actually ‘toying’ with the language of statistics)

              … Then the opposite is also true. “Europeans are the MOST prejudiced towards choosing a partner of DIFFERENT ethnicity”

              Additionally, since ‘prejudice’ generally describes comparison between different rather than the same ethnicities, I believe the second statement is more pertinent to this ethnic inter-marriage discussion.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  March 11, 2017

              If there was no prejudice towards or away from the same ethnicity as a partner then the ratio numbers in the little table I gave would all be 1.

              As they are all greater than one it shows that there is a preference for same ethnicity partners in all of the ethnic groups. However this may be no more than the consequence of living and mixing in somewhat selective ethnic groups.

            • You would say that Alan, being the man who “toys” with the language of statistics …

              Many Asian and European women choose (or can choose) their NZ partners from over the internet while living in their countries of origin …

              NZ men travel to these countries of origin, some specifically to find partners …

              Random choice might apply to laboratory rats Alan but I reckon its got bugger all to do with human partner selection …

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  March 11, 2017

              Random choice has everything to do with statistical analysis and nothing to do with anything else. It is simply the null hypothesis that others should be tested against.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  March 10, 2017

          One can’t generalise about one person, surely.

          • I repeat, “you’re not really generalising are you? You’re denigrating …”

  3. Corky

     /  March 9, 2017

    What does this mean in Maori terms,or tikanga? Well, I’m surprised no one has answered that question given the ‘experts’ we have on this blog regarding Maoridom.

    The King ( Tuwharetoa) has disrespected Tainui’s mana via snubbing Nanaia Mahuta. Utu will be demanded one way or another. In olden times a vicious battle would ensue with many killed. Thank god for the treaty.

    However, its not Mahuta who has a problem, its the King. Should the Maori Party be ‘ brown nosed’ the King will lose mana. Expect a vigorous election campaign, with possible violence should the bros get het up.

    • Corky – I’m no expert on tikanga but “The very ink with which history is written is merely fluid prejudice” – Mark Twain

      So alternatively, in olden times a vicious though largely ceremonial battle would ensue with some casualties and possibly a few deaths … “Deadlands” is a fictional movie apparently written by a pakeha …

      I agree though, the King has placed himself in a rather precarious position. Perhaps that’s why our Queen keeps her nose out of politics … or appears to …

      However, Prince Charles did a bit of lobbying a while ago I seem to recall …?
      I gather he’s something of a Greenie …

      Should add some spice to the election campaign …?
      Beats the hell out of beneficiary bashing …

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  March 11, 2017

        Apart from the fobvious act that Europeans tend to have pink skin, they are from ? backgrounds. I have no more in common with a Swede or Belgian than an Indian does with a Laotian.

        Asian is a meaningless term-look at the size and variety of Asia. Asian could ,mean Pakistani or Japanese, Vietnamese or Korean…..

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  March 11, 2017

          Obvious ! That should have been further up, anyway.

          The Queen must not interfere with politics, it’s not ‘keeping her nose out’ as someone insultingly put it. It doesn’t matter what she thinks. The reigning monarch doesn’t even vote, I believe.

          • Pickled Possum

             /  March 11, 2017

            Hey Miss when I say Asians I mean Asians in their many forms.
            Did you think I was only meaning one particular group?
            But Al’s Little chart yesterday seemed to prove my eyesight is failing me 😎
            as most Asians (in their many ethincities) do not appear be marrying some other ethnicity …
            at such a young and tender age, I may need glasses.

            “The Queen must not interfere with politics” So What is she doan up there on her Queen chair?
            Hope your little cottage in the Wai has survived the down pour. 😉
            PS ….As a matter of interest have you ever had a Maori friend
            a close one not a queen wave one.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  March 11, 2017

              Yes, one of my bridesmaids was Maori with a Chinese husband.. The other was Kiwi-Chinese, married to a Pakeha . We used to have a Black Power family down the street in our other house, and were very friendly with them and their family members who lived next door.

              The Queen is on the throne as Monarch, but she is not a politician, and as I said, she must not interfere with politics. Look it up, it will be on Google.

              I thought that I must be reading the rain gauge wrong this morning & even brought it in to look through glasses ! It had a tiny leaf in it, but that wouldn’t have made any difference. Then the rain suddenly stopped, a few drips and that was it. It was like turning off the shower. The birds were able to have their meal after all. You should see the dog running out, looking resigned to the inevitable, doing what he has to do as fast as possible, then racing back in.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  March 11, 2017

        No, she doesn’t, it’s not a legal requirement but the Queen (and her immediate family) don’t register to vote, It’s a long standing convention that the monarch is above politics, even to that extent.

        Imagine having ‘Queen’ as occupation in the electoral roll.

        • Pickled Possum

           /  March 11, 2017

          Too much Miss I appreciate your comments even when you say Imagine 😉
          Imagine all the people
          Sharing all the world…
          Have a great day in the Wai
          ps my cat just opened one eye and seems to be sayin
          What I gotta go outside Now!! Yep you feline best friend of ours
          The rain is over rover and it’s back to Reality.

        • I wonder if the Maori King votes? And if he registers his occupation as ‘King’ or ‘Kingi’? We don’t know. We pakeha know very little about Kingitanga … least of all from personal or direct experience … although many of us denigrate it at will …

          Its a long-standing convention that the English monarch is above politics Miss Kitty, except in times of war … It doesn’t necessarily apply to a Maori or any other culture’s monarch, appointed or annointed leader …?

          Perhaps the Maori situation of Ka Whawhai Tonu Matou – Struggle Without End – excuses the King from being impartial? Influential Maori leaders have a long history of partiality and political alignment, as in Ratana-Labour …

          The only thing more frightening to pakeha is the truly independent Maori leader, people like Wiremu Tamihana – who after establishing an independent community went on to become ‘the Kingmaker’ – Te Whiti o Rongomai & Tohu at Parihaka and Rua Kenana …

          • PDB

             /  March 11, 2017

            PZ: We pakeha know very little about Kingitanga” – you don’t speak for all ‘pakeha’, you speak only from your own very narrow, pompous & condescending viewpoint.

            If we ever wanted further proof of your pretentiousness we now have it.

            • PDB – So you’re saying in a roundabout, aggressive and derogatory way that you know quite a lot about Kingitanga …?

              Where from?
              What are your sources of this knowledge and wisdom?

            • PDB

               /  March 11, 2017

              I’m saying a few things….

              *You don’t speak for all ‘Pakeha’.
              *’Pakeha’ covers a wide range of people hence how they act can’t be categorized or generalized like you do including many who ‘appear’ European but identify themselves as Maori.
              *I was brought up as a minority European in a predominantly Maori community within the King Country/Waikato and hence was heavily influenced by Maori people, local history, traditions, customs and ways – plenty of ‘pakeha’ were in the past (mass urbanisation means it isn’t as common today).
              *From my perspective much of what you discuss as part of your ‘white guilt trip’ is of little importance to the majority of everyday Maori – for me it comes across as condescending and unhelpful in the general scheme of things.

  4. Brown

     /  March 10, 2017

    This is tribalism working. Its a poison in civilised society but learn to like it you will.

    • Politics is a form of tribalism.

      • Cronyism is tribalism. The Business Roundtable-NZ Initiative are tribes. National & Labour and all the Parties are tribes …

        So what’s the difference?
        For some reason we want ‘our’ tribes NOT to have blood ties …?

        Instead they must be ‘tied’ by ‘our’ acculturation … e.g. letters after your name …

        I imagine some people might find this “odd”?

        Meantime, for example, Pakeha farmers often do everything possible to keep their farms “in the family” …

  5. Zedd

     /  March 10, 2017

    more evidence, that the myth of all the ‘poor maoris’ is further being disproved; the Maori party claim to be ‘representing their people’ as they move further & further to the centre-RIGHT !

    dont get me wrong.. I accept that there are many maori who ARE struggling (as are many non-maori).. BUT obviously not ALL 😦

    • Corky

       /  March 10, 2017

      Zeddy, poke me in the eye with a stick- I agree with you.

    • PDB

       /  March 10, 2017

      “the Maori party claim to be ‘representing their people’ as they move further & further to the centre-RIGHT !”

      And your proof of this is? Working with a centre-right govt on issues that affect Maori whilst voting more with left-wing parties during the year on other issues isn’t it.

      • PDB

         /  March 10, 2017

        To add – if you are actually correct that the Maori party is moving to the centre-right why would that not be ‘representing their people’? Considering the National party has done more for the Maori cause over the past 40 years than any Labour govt in that time isn’t that a wise move?