UK & Europe

UK-EU

 

More trouble within the European Union.

Guardian: Poland reacts with fury to re-election of Donald Tusk

Donald Tusk has won a second term as European council president, overcoming bitter opposition from Poland that has left the country isolated in Europe.

Tusk, a former Polish prime minister, was re-elected on Thursday with overwhelming support to lead the council, the body that organises EU leaders’ meetings, for a second term lasting two and a half years. His reappointment until the end of 2019 means he will play a crucial role in Britain’s negotiations to leave the EU.

The Pole, from the pro-European centre-right Civic Platform party, overcame strong resistance from his own government, led by the Eurosceptic Law and Justice party (PiS). The outcome was never in doubt, but is a blow for the Warsaw government, which responded with fury.

“We know now that it [the EU] is a union under Berlin’s diktat,” the Polish foreign minister, Witold Waszczykowski, told Polish media, echoing persistent claims by PiS that the EU is controlled by Berlin.

Despite its anger, however, Poland was left isolated as other countries including traditional central European allies lined up to back Tusk, a popular choice to guide the EU through difficult Brexit talks and tense debates on migration.

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8 Comments

  1. Missy

     /  11th March 2017

    Pete, you beat me to it on that story. I was just about to write something about it.

    Poland was counting on UK support in this, but they voted for Tusk which has left Poland upset, and Britain in a tricky situation. Poland was expected to be a key ally in the Brexit negotiations for the UK, they may still be but it is possible they may not be as supportive as once expected.

    Theresa May was left in a difficult position with this vote, either upset Poland or isolate themselves from the other 26 nations – not an easy diplomatic position, however, it was not expected that May would vote with Poland as she has said that Tusk is doing a good job, but some thought she may abstain from the vote.

    Reply
    • Sorry, I’m not trying to beat you to stories. I thought that having something of interest in the post itself helps draw attention to the post, and covers us if you can’t get to post anything. But I’ll try a different approach and wait until after you’ve had a chance to introduce some topics.

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  11th March 2017

        I didn’t mean it in a bad way, I was joking. Sorry I should have put a 😀 after my comment, but was ambit rushed for a work team building Afternoon. Sorry, it wasn’t a complaint or criticism, just a little joke.

        Reply
  2. Missy

     /  11th March 2017

    I will have to leave you lot to this today, due to other commitments I won’t be around much until tomorrow (Saturday)

    Reply
  3. Brown

     /  11th March 2017

    I struggle with the idea that Britain has to negotiate to leave the EU. They just decide to do so and do in an orderly fashion and plot their own course without being under the watchful eye of thousands of expensive nobodies in Brussels. The commercial issues around trade are distinct from the sovereignty of the UK. We seem to have made everything incredibly difficult to preserve the positions of bureaucrats.

    Reply
    • Good point, but I think that the UK has contractual obligations.

      Reply
    • Missy

       /  11th March 2017

      As Pete said thee are contractual obligations, but also relationships to work out going forward regarding security, police, intelligence, status of citizens, financial market etc not to mention sorting out and negotiating a trade deal.

      Reply
  4. Missy

     /  11th March 2017

    Media outlets in the UK are reporting that Brexit could be triggered as early as Tuesday (15 March was originally thought to be the expected date by many). The Article 50 Bill heads back to the Commons on Monday. The Conservatives are expected to face a rebellion on the amendments, but Party whips have indicated they are confident that they can convince the rebels to vote against the amendments by providing assurances on the timetable of the deal. If it passes the Commons on Monday the Bill will go back to the Lords on Monday as well, and Labour sources have indicated the Party’s Peers are prepared to give way gracefully.

    Monday and Tuesday should be interesting days, and then Wednesday is the Dutch election.

    Reply

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