Morgan/TOP aim to hit and run?

Gareth Morgan is piling a heap of time, resources and money into his The Opportunities Party. He is doing some good policy research and floating some ideas worth at least discussing.

Newshub report on an interview with him on The Nation yesterday: Slash super to pay for Universal Basic Income – Gareth Morgan

Opportunities Party leader Gareth Morgan says he doesn’t support raising the age of superannuation, but he does want means-testing to restrict higher-income earners who don’t need it.

He also told The Nation under his policy everyone would get a Universal Basic Income (UBI) of $10,000 a year, paid for by slashing current super entitlements.

He says his party did a poll on what would get voters to the polling booth, and the top issue was cannabis law reform. Their negligence about issues like superannuation is part of the problem, he says.

On cannabis law reform, he says his party still needs to discuss it.

Morgan is prepared to discuss contentious issues that other parties are trying to avoid committing themselves on.

He did a good job of selling himself and his party early in the interview. But then he sent out some very confusing signals.

Patrick Gower: I think there you said it, you know, you’re trying to inform people. Is that what you are, an ideas man? You’re not really a politician, are you? You’re not really here to make it into parliament. You’re here to get your ideas out there.

Gareth Morgan: I’m here to get the seven policies as much traction as I can. I mean, my ideal scenario would be the Nats or Labour, whoever’s going to be government, say, ‘We’ll do it all, Gareth, now bugger off.’ I would love that. So I’m not going in there for a job. I’m going in there to try and make New Zealand better because we can do it.

So he wants to change everything but doesn’t want to be in Parliament? That doesn’t look like an approach that will encourage votes.

Patrick Gower: What I’m saying is, are you really serious about it? Because it seems that it’s your ideas that you’re more pushing, rather than a realistic chance of making parliament. I mean, have you got anyone who’s even interested in standing with you yet?

Gareth Morgan: Most people who I respect, who I would want to stand, so I have worked with in the past or are authorities in the area, when I’m talking to them say, ‘Jeez, I’m not going near that toxic environment. You think I’m going to put my family at risk?’ And I’m thinking, ‘Come on, you’re a New Zealander.’ It’s a bit like when I took on cats, you know, and I got these phone calls saying, ‘We support you.’ And I’d say, ‘Well, stand up with me then.’ ‘Oh, God, no. Not doing that.’

This doesn’t sound positive at all about wanting to be in Parliament.

Getting policy results is a lot more than floating ideas. You have to get enough parties/votes in Parliament to back them and take them through all the stages of Parliament and win each vote along the way.

It sounds like Morgan just wants to hit Parliament with his policies and run, rather than run for Parliament and become a hit.

 

 

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48 Comments

  1. “This doesn’t sound positive at all about wanting to be in Parliament.”

    You could say that. “This toxic environment” doesn’t sound positive about Parliament full stop … and I’ve heard others say it, notably Sandra Lee …

    Morgan & TOP may indeed be a “hit and run” minor party but consider the difference in an MMP environment to the great “spoiler”, fellow tycoon Bob Jones’ New Zealand Party during the halcyon days of First-Past-the-Post …

    Jones would no doubt be much admired by many YourNZer’s for his hand in bringing down the great “socialist” Robert Muldoon? NZ’s own National Party Stalin. And for splitting the vote and allowing Labour to win … I have no doubt whatsoever that Jones knew precisely what that meant …

    Oh … the irony …

    Ironic too … Free-Market era multi-millionaire Gareth Morgan is advocating a fairer, more just society … a society with greater ‘social conscience’ … somewhat more [Muldoon-like & socialist] government intervention in areas of the economy …. whereas “self-made millionaire and author” Bob Jones “spoke out against the government, claiming that the National Party had betrayed its principles of individual liberty and free enterprise.” – Wiki

    So … In the terrible interventionist, Muldoon era socialist environment, how did Bob Jones become a self-made multi-millionaire exactly …?

    “How long … Oh … How long will it be …?
    How long … How long can we take it …?
    How long before we take it back, you and me?
    Think Fast …”

    ‘Fast Buck Freddie’ – BVT&tCN featuring Grace Slick …

    Reply
    • For the young readers … and the young at heart …

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_Party

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  12th March 2017

        Property investment.

        Hear the teeth of those who didn’t take opportunities grinding themselves down.

        Reply
        • “Property investment” …!? No shit Sherlock ….

          Can’t have been ALL THAT socialist then, can it?

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  12th March 2017

            Why ?

            Reply
            • Oh jeeeez … because if it was truly socialist here in New Zealand Jones wouldn’t have been able to make his millions doing property speculation here in NZ, would he?

              Socialism = a political and economic theory of social organization which advocates that the means of production, distribution, and exchange should be owned or regulated by the community as a whole.

            • PDB

               /  12th March 2017

              Somewhat hypocritical PZ considering you continually bang on about how NZ is a some sort of neoliberalist paradise when it’s obviously a mixed economy……

            • And it WAS a mixed economy that you “bang on about” being ‘socialist’ PDB …

  2. Kevin

     /  12th March 2017

    Superannuation has always been one of those things where it doesn’t matter who is power whoever touches it always ends up pissing everyone off.

    Cannabis law reform is a big issue as there are people needlessly suffering as a direct result of Dunne’s stonewalling on medical marijuana. If people like Dunne are that concerned about people getting stoned then just put a limit on the amount of THC allowed per cigarette.

    Reply
    • I realise you’ve already more-or-less said this Kevin, but “there are people needlessly suffering as a direct result of Dunne’s stonewalling on recreational marijuana” too.

      Suffering in prisons, suffering on home-detention – graphically recorded in an excellent article in the latest North & South magazine – suffering fear of becoming criminals, suffering paranoia and suspicion about obtaining or growing the herb … etc etc …

      Reply
      • A huge piss-off for me is that Labour came up with a future-proof way of financing Super, the so-called “Cullen Fund”, which is actually the NZ Superannuation Fund …

        National in their near-sighted, petty spite have failed to contribute and now they’re [conveniently] complaining that Super is unaffordable …

        ” … the crudest, most ignorant and bigoted collection of far-right reactionaries by which NZ has ever had the misfortune to be governed.” – Chris Trotter, ‘No Left Turn’, writing about the First National government of Sid Holland …

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_Superannuation_Fund

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  12th March 2017

          Holland stiffed the waterfront unions. That was probably a good thing. What else did he do to annoy Trotter?

          Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  12th March 2017

          National can’t be blamed for people living longer. There is is only so much that tax revenue can do. If you don’t mind taxes rising enormously, you are in a minority. Any government has to do an accounting act that is as fair as it can be, with so many people demanding that the money go to them. Music therapy for a child isn’t covered, and I don’t think that it should be. Dogs for people alone aren’t either, and they shouldn’t be either, although the dog is often the person’s sole companion.

          People whinge about ACC levies, but as my costs after the hit and run when I was on a motorbike would have taken something like 500 years to pay back from my levies, this is something that I would never complain about again.

          Reply
      • Kevin

         /  12th March 2017

        Let’s not forgot all the young people who have had their future’s ruined as a result of single joint and getting a criminal record as a result.

        Reply
  3. At least Morgan mentioned ‘the elephant in the room’ ; Cannabis law reform !

    in 2011-14 about 30% of kiwis (many 18-35) did not bother to vote.. Morgan seems to be saying, he hears that this is because this issue is important to them (& others) & is being constantly ignored by the ‘mainstream’ politicians.
    The Greens have recently put out a revised policy, BUT it has hardly had more than a passing mention. Its all well & good to discuss it, but there does seem to be a widespread feeling, that it will remain on the ‘back-burner’ unless/until the ‘missing million’ perhaps get out & vote: ALCP !!

    Roll on 23/9 🙂

    Reply
    • If only ‘politics’ was ‘positics’ eh Zedd …? [that’s new word # 91 incidentally]

      Cannabis is potentially a huge export industry for Aotearoa NZ and especially the economically challenged Far North …

      Super [especially Flexi-Super] is potentially a source of huge employment opportunity, stress reduction, health benefits, community development and economic stimulous to Aotearoa NZ …

      Unemployment as ‘community wage’ is potentially a source of huge benefit to provincial regions, local communities … with all sorts of positive outcomes …

      Housing development, including planning and finance provisions, is potentially a huge source of employment, improved quality of life … and combined with other things like regional development policies, rejuvination of provinces and regions …

      Etc etc … on and on it goes … Positics also has the potential to ‘engage’ more voters and enhance participation in society …

      But politics as we know it is actually ‘negatics’ … [#92]

      Reply
      • @P_Z

        ‘Cannabis is potentially a huge export industry…’ too true, BUT the Natz, seem more intent on the status quo.. WASTING $100millions/year on ‘prohibition industry’ (Job Protection); Police, Courts, Prisons. You just have to look at their MPs 3-4 are ex-cops, pushing misinfo. from ‘reefer madness’ etc. ?

        Rather than looking to changes occurring in most of the OECD, NZ looks more like the draconian ‘east’ . They just ignore the 70%+ who ARE calling for reform, unfortunately, many seem apathetic to demanding it 😦

        “VIVA LA REVOLUCION” 😀

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  12th March 2017

          NZ’s law is ardly draconian-do you know the meaning of this word ?

          Reply
          • Hmmm, “draconian” … harsh, severe, strict, extreme, drastic, stringent, tough, swingeing, cruel, brutal, oppressive, ruthless, relentless, summary, punitive, authoritarian, despotic, tyrannical, arbitrary, repressive, iron-fisted; suppressive …

            Sounds mostly accurate to me regards Aotearoa NZ’s cannabis law …

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  12th March 2017

              Hardly.

              Tough and strict hardly meet the criteria of draconoan-nor are they on the same level as despotic, swingeing, cruel, brutal…..what’s the worst that will happen to someone caught smoking dope ?

            • Well, Miss Kitty, I quoted a dictionary definition …

              Firstly, its not just smoking dope, its growing it and possessing more than 28(?) grams, above which is deemed to be “for the purposes of supply” ….

              In the latest North & South magazine, the reality of home detention is graphically described in the first-person by a 60 year old man convicted of growing 4 plants … recommended reading …

              But of course if you don’t “show remorse” or happen to just get a judge who takes a dislike to you or is having a bad day you can go to prison for 2 years or more for about the same amount …

              Its draconian all right … by modern day standards …

        • Kevin

           /  12th March 2017

          If you drink you have four times the chance of going into rehab than if you just did cannabis. And people who do MDMA (a Class B drug!) are one thousand times less likely to end up in rehab than drinkers.

          Also, studies have shown that it alcohol, not cannabis, that is a gateway drug to harder drugs like meth:

          http://www.wakeupnz.net/amy-adams-cannabis-gateway-to-meth/

          Examples of studies concluding the gateway theory to be false include a 2002 study based on recent survey data on nearly 4,000 children and young adults which finds:

          ● No significant impact of soft drug use on the risk of later involvement with crack and heroin.

          ● Very little impact of soft drug use on the risk of later involvement in crime.

          Add to this the peer-reviewed study published in the Journal of School Health which found that cannabis is not the gateway drug, but instead the most commonly used legalised drug in New Zealand, alcohol, is the precursor to use of much harder drugs like amphetamines.

          ‘While it may not settle the debate over how drug use begins, researchers found that alcohol, not marijuana, is the gateway drug that leads teens down the path of hard drug use, according to a new study that will be published in the August edition of the Journal of School Health.

          Researchers looked at data from over 14,500 students from 120 public and private schools in the United States to evaluate whether students had used any of 11 substances, including alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, LSD, amphetamines, tranquilizers and other narcotics. They found that more often than not, alcohol was the first substance students tried before moving on to other drugs.

          “I am confident in our findings and the clear implications they have for school-based prevention programs. By delaying and/or preventing the use of alcohol, these programs can indirectly reduce the rate of use of other substances,” Barry said in a statement.

          Alcohol was also the most commonly used substance, according to the study. More than 70 percent of students reported using alcohol at some point during their lifetime, compared to only 45 percent who reported using tobacco and 43 percent who used marijuana.

          Researchers also found that students who used alcohol were up to 16 times more likely to use illicit drugs.’

          Reply
      • Gezza

         /  12th March 2017

        @ PZ. Would you mind publishing a list of your new words to date, with their definitions, please?

        Reply
        • Would you believe it Gezza … I haven’t kept a record of them all …

          Might be an interesting research topic for someone on YourNZ?
          (Yeah … Right!)

          I’m pretty sure my tally is accurate though … give-or-take a few …

          Emotellect is one of my better efforts I reckon …

          Reply
  4. Kitty Catkin

     /  12th March 2017

    Morgan’s idea of $10,000 and top-ups is totally unrealistic; for once I am in complete agreement with Andrew Little. The admin costs and the time would be ridiculous. As he said, everyone would be different-it would a nightmare trying to do it.

    I would be very surprised if anyone took Reefer Madness seriously nowadays.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  12th March 2017

      You are confusing %s with numbers. 3% are/were police officers. NOT 3/4 which would be 75%.

      Reply
    • @kck

      ‘I would be very surprised if anyone took Reefer madness seriously nowadays’

      The two main issues, from this docudrama, that are still often heard:

      1) causes mental illness; maybe a small portion, BUT many prohibitionists would have us believe, its a MAJOR problem.. (estimates are less than 5%.. when the research shows many people who supposedly develop a mental illness, likely already had predisposed symptoms prior to using cannabis) They should focus on treating those who have problems, not just banning it outright. Excuses, excuses to maintain status quo

      2) gateway to HARD DRUGS.. in reality it is Black-market dealers that create this issue, by offering other drugs to regular ‘pot-smokers’… BUT they still claim, a majority move onto to Heroin or Meth etc. Total Misinfo. again likely a small percentage of the total 😦

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  12th March 2017

        Drama, not docu.One poster shows a giant syringe, and the effects on people who use it are ludicrously overdone. It was sensationalism, and laughed at even in the 30s. Only a fool would believe this H-grade nonsense now.

        Reply
    • @ Miss Kitty – “I would be very surprised if anyone took Reefer Madness seriously nowadays.”

      Except the NZ Police and Court and Penal systems IF THEY WANT TO …

      Reply
      • Kevin

         /  12th March 2017

        I wouldn’t be surprised if the EACD took reefer madness seriously …

        Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  12th March 2017

        Have you SEEN it ?

        Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  12th March 2017

        Google Reefer Madness and look at the old posters ! The Police must know that it doesn’t have THOSE effects upon people, and so must anyone else who has anything to do with it.

        Reply
        • The NZ Police have extraordinary powers to search one’s person, home or car on the basis of a mere suspicion of marijuana, other drugs or drug paraphenalia …

          While that remains, they can invoke contemporary or “temporary” ‘Reefer Madness’ whenever and wherever they want … And I believe some of the reasons they do so fall a long, long way short of law enforcement, much less justice …

          As far as marijuana is concerned, they are enforcing unjust laws to begin with …

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  13th March 2017

            Reefer Madness is a joke. Do you know anything about it ?

            The laws on possession of a small amount are not very strict, it’s dealers who are given real sentences.

            Reply
            • Let’s drop the Reefer Madness allusion, shall we Miss Kitty … its driving me Bonkers!

              Real sentences are given to whomsoever the Police &/or Judiciary want to GET …

              And the unjust laws they are supposedly enforcing are what creates the dealers in the first place …

              Oh stuff it … Let’s call it REEFER MADNESS!!!!!

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  13th March 2017

              The Police and ‘Judiciary’ don’t have so much time on their hands that they go after people for no reason and have them convicted.

  5. PDB

     /  12th March 2017

    “Opportunities Party leader Gareth Morgan says he doesn’t support raising the age of superannuation, but he does want means-testing to restrict higher-income earners who don’t need it.”

    And then in the same breath he is going to give these same ‘higher-income earners who don’t need it’ $10,000??

    Imagine the accountancy, lawyer and valuation costs one would need to fork out for in order to not incur penalties under his ridiculous ‘tax all assets annually’ policy.

    Reply
  6. Alan Wilkinson

     /  12th March 2017

    At $10K per person per year the UBI is almost as much as the single Super and more than the couples’ Super so to claim cutting Super is going to fund it is simply false. It would have to be funded by his new tax on assets so that would not be funded by reductions in income tax. As usual when you look at a Morgan proposal it is full of crap.

    Reply
    • Or full of positivity, hope and foresight …

      As Zedd said about cannabis, at least Morgan has the courage to mention elephants in the room …

      Reply
    • PDB

       /  12th March 2017

      Destroying the NZ economy is neither positive, hopeful or shows foresight……

      Reply
  7. Blazer

     /  12th March 2017

    wonderful to see a very wealthy NZ’er try to at least start discussion about reforms that are urgently needed.This is altruism at its best.Morgan shows up the smug ,entitled rich who lack empathy and civic virtue.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  12th March 2017

      No, he shows up himself as megalomaniacal and pushing not even half-baked ideas.

      Reply
    • PDB

       /  12th March 2017

      Some might say he has made his money and wants to ‘pull the ladder up’ after himself and stop others having the same opportunities he had…….

      Reply

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