Open Forum – Sunday

12 March 2017

Facebook: NZ politics/media+

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Previous Post

81 Comments

  1. Missy

     /  March 12, 2017

    Well kiwis, the news this morning for you is bad if you are an AB fan, it looks like England have equalled the AB record (currently 47-14 to England with 22mins to go), and based on Ireland’s last two outings will pass it next week.

    Cue media talking about it like it is a loss – especially as botox Eddie (as my Irish friend calls him) is in charge of England.

    Best tweet on the game today though:

    • Come in London … Are you there …?

      I don’t see it as bad Missy … the better the competition the better the games usually …

      However, I might be a rare Kiwi whose self-esteem and national pride don’t hinge upon the performance of the All Blacks …?

      Anyhow, if its anything like that Ireland tour a few years back … we’ll just take out their best players early in the first game …

      • Missy

         /  March 12, 2017

        The only thing that bugs me about it is that Eddie Jones is the England Coach, but you are right, it isn’t bad and better teams are better competition.

        I was being tongue in cheek, poking a bit of fun at those that get a little over emotional about every loss etc of the AB’s.

        And I don’t think you are rare, to be honest I think it is only the media who believe our self esteem and national pride hinge upon the performance of the AB’s, most people in NZ I believe have a much stronger sense of self worth in both themselves and their country.

        • Pickled Possum

           /  March 12, 2017

          Morena Missy today is the 6 consecutive day of rain, with some breaks so I could go into the fruit forest to work. The gala apples are so delis off the tree.
          Do not taste like the shop brought at all. How do you survive in rainy England?
          Your comment …
          “I think it is only the media who believe our self esteem and national pride hinge upon the performance of the AB’s” this rings so true to me.
          I also am reminded that in 2012-2013 ACC paid out $64 million to rugby related injuries, that figure just astounds me. In a little country of 4.4+ million people, with 85% of our rugby players under 16 years and our spinal units with 1/3 spinal injuries from rugby, I am just waiting for the day when Line Dancing will be our national sport. 😉

          • Missy

             /  March 12, 2017

            Morena PP, I grew up in the Waikato – dampness is in my blood. 😉 Though we have had a lovely start to Spring with very little rain, today was lovely and very warm. Only a couple of weeks until the clocks go forward and we start Summer time. 🙂

            If I recall correctly from my (short) time working for ACC many years ago, I think rugby and netball were the highest number of sporting injuries and had huge payouts.

            I am not sure I would want Line Dancing to be our national sport, I have no rhythm, at least I know how to do a drop kick and tackle a player (my dad always said you take them out at the knees – if you have the knees they can’t run). 🙂

            • Gezza

               /  March 12, 2017

              True, but they can still kick you in the face with their sprigs before they go down, arms flailing, if you don’t keep your head to one side as you dive at them. 🤕

            • Missy

               /  March 12, 2017

              Speaking from experience G?

              That’s why you come in from the side or front – it’s like approaching a horse, never approach from behind.

            • Gezza

               /  March 12, 2017

              Only the once. Good lesson Missy. Good tackle too. Except for the sprigs in the face. That part wasn’t so good. 🤕 I couldn’t come in from the side – the bastard was directly in front of me heading for the try line, I couldn’t gain on the blighter, & a dive was the only hope.

            • Pickled Possum

               /  March 12, 2017

              Hehe Missy our Mum told us to take any one that was trying to hurt us
              Out at the knees but she added a “and when they go down Run for your life!!!
              Missy can you tell me where in Hamilton would be a good place to move that’s close to Wintec, is a warm safe place, for a family to go live?

    • I don’t think this is bad for the ABs at all. I’m looking forward to when the ABs and England play again. Strong competition at the top is important for the game and makes things more interesting.

      • Missy

         /  March 12, 2017

        I agree Pete, I was being a bit tongue in cheek.

        I am just annoyed it is Eddie Jones who is coaching, and I was very disappointed Scotland lost today, but that is because for as long as I can remember it is Scotland we support in the six nations (or five nations as it was) due to heritage.

  2. Corky

     /  March 12, 2017

    Listened to a Conservative Party member on National Socialist Radio. He was a White South African. I’m not usually impressed by white South Afreekins, but this guy was on to it.
    Asked why he couldn’t vote for National he said they were fiscally conservative, but socially liberal. Bullseye. He then said NZ1st was conservative in some things, but he couldn’t vote for them because they may form a coalition with Labour. Bullseye.

    But the best part of the interview was his parents foresight to leave South Africa once apartheid ended. They realised once blacks got control of the country it would be over for both the country and Whitey. Something ironically backed up by John Minto who stated the South Africa of today is not the South Africa he fought for.

    Unlike this chaps parents, I’m always fascinated by folk who can define a problem to the nth degree, post a shitload of facts…but are never able to see into the future as to what those findings mean and the likely outcome.

    We have a similar problem with Maori in New Zealand. The facts are in. The beginning of Maori imposed apartheid is apparent…but so many can’t see the future.

    • Missy

       /  March 12, 2017

      They were smart to leave when they did going on Jacob Zuma’s latest plan – channeling Mugabe it seems.

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/03/03/jacob-zuma-calls-confiscation-white-land-without-compensation/

      • Corky

         /  March 12, 2017

        Unbelievable, isn’t it Missy. And to my knowledge not a mention from our media. Next comes tribalism. After that slaughter. The John Minto’s from around the world who worked tirelessly for a new South Africa deserve better. They concentrated too much on the failings of White South Africa, and not enough on the failing of native races around the world.

        • Missy

           /  March 12, 2017

          Indeed Corky.

          I wonder how many white South Africans are nervously remembering what happened in Zimbabwe, and worse still, the fact that the western world refused to treat the white farmers as refugees despite their lives being in danger.

          • Oh yes Corky and Missy, what a model nation Rhodesia was …

            A glimpse of what Aotearoa NZ might have been like if it had been ruled by The New Zealand Company … The Wakefields …?

            How many Black Zimbabweans are remembering their ancestors slaughtered, deceived, colonised, deprived of almost every human right, robbed and oppressed by the Whites …

            Oh … the poor Whites …

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_settlement_in_Zimbabwe_before_1923

            • Corky

               /  March 12, 2017

              Thank god Black Zimbabweans, having been under the suppression of Whites for so long, had plenty of time to work things out and not make the same mistakes.

              So hows the fruit bowl of Africa doing, Parti?

            • Conspiratoor

               /  March 12, 2017

              “So hows the fruit bowl of Africa doing, Parti?”

              Zimbabwe’s a black utopian paradise brother corks

              “From bread-basket to basket case: Land seizures from white farmers have cost Mugabe’s Zimbabwe £7billion”

              http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2022014/Mugabes-land-seizures-white-farmers-cost-Zimbabwe-7bn

            • Corky & Conspiratoor, I didn’t say or even imply I thought Black Zimbabweans were necessarily doing it well …

              Blacks had all the land seized off them in the first place. What did it cost them … their homes, their culture, their lives … ?

              “So hows the fruit bowl of Africa doing, Parti?”

              I don’t really know. I think the White people fucked it over Corky … and by fucking over the Black people they bought a backlash upon themselves …

              Why is it just fine-and-dandy for Mother England to recognise and accommodate the caste system in India into her colonial rule … but not the tribal system in Africa?

              Of course, I suppose you could argue the Black’s should have just been thankful to be third-class citizens or non-citizens in their own country …?

            • … And do everything they could to disrupt the tribal system in Aotearoa NZ …

            • Conspiratoor

               /  March 12, 2017

              @parti

              “Blacks had all the land seized off them in the first place. What did it cost them … their homes, their culture, their lives … ?”

              By the above you imply if the evil whitey had not happened along and left the blacks alone they would have been somewhat better off. By way of example please point to one black utopian paradise in Africa where black rule has been the norm. You danced around on a pin’s head when I asked you a similar question yesterday but I’m prepared to give you another shot

            • I can’t answer that question Conspiratoor. Its not a sensible question and hence not possible to answer …

              We don’t know what a Black society uncontaminated by European colonisation was or is like. The earliest records of Europeans simply record their own contamination of the societies they observed and inherently interfered with …

              Modern Black African societies are all altered and/or contaminated by colonisation and Westernisation, and consequently can’t be used as examples of your derisive “black utopian paradise” …

              It’s a quasi-or-pseudo question … and consequently a pathetic one to add to several others asked of me today …

          • Nelly Smickers

             /  March 12, 2017

            When I was shopping at the *Browns Bay Market* just before Xmas, there was a lovely South African family there selling Tee Shirts. The one that took my fancy had a big picture of *Mugabe* on the back and underneath it read: *HITLER – now available in black* XD

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  March 12, 2017

          The only hope is for the ANC to be defeated electorally.

    • “The beginning of Maori imposed apartheid is apparent …”

      But … Corky … immediately above that you have said Apartheid was better for South Africa … So ‘separate development’ is better … Right?

      I mean … really … seriously? … The unbelievable irony …!!!
      Possibly Trollony … Troll’s Irony … [new word # 90]

      His parents’ “foresight” was almost certainly absolute necessity … if they had anything whatsoever to do with the Apartheid regime … which … Lo & Behold … Every single White South African did! … bar a few human rights campaigners … Luckily, NZ’s doors were wide open to them …

      John Minto may have said “not the South Africa he fought for” but I guarantee you he hasn’t said “We should have left the Blacks to rot under White Apartheid rule” …

      Your Maori-imposed apartheid is, in our infant post-colonial era, simply the continuation of redress vouchsafed by natural justice … “going forward” …

      But for the purposes of humouring you Corky … and because you’ve put so much effort and possibly got paid for your ‘comment’ … What, in your considered opinion, is the “likely outcome” of Maori-imposed apartheid?

  3. Corky

     /  March 12, 2017

    [But … Corky … immediately above that you have said Apartheid was better for South Africa … So ‘separate development’ is better … Right?’]

    You live too much inside your head…and it causes confusion on occasions. Where did I say that? Ah,I implied it…right?

    [But for the purposes of humouring you Corky … and because you’ve put so much effort and possibly got paid for your ‘comment’ … What, in your considered opinion, is the “likely outcome” of Maori-imposed apartheid?]

    Such a condescending superior attitude. Similar to white people and colonial aggressors you rail against…are you Andy’s secretary?

    What is the likely outcome of Maori imposed apartheid? Well, lets start with something simple. Auckland’s icon landmarks.

  4. Corky

     /  March 12, 2017

    Islam gaining more control in Indonesia. It just up the road folks, and Australia is just across the street.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4301104/Whipped-100-times-having-sex-outside-marriage.html

    • Interesting second comment from Private51 Corky …

      “Let’s face it, most DM readers want Sharia Law without the Muslim immigrants…… I do not, as a libertarian.”

      And WelshTaffy …

      “I agree that sex abusers should be caned, but not for gambling and sex outside marriage?”

      • Missy

         /  March 12, 2017

        Hahahahaha….. Parti taking the trolls seriously.

        Parti, I am not sure why you have bothered trawling the comments for some from the trolls Parti, or what your point is – except there are idiots that read (and comment on) the DM to wind up folks like you.

        • Sorry Missy … I don’t get it … are you calling Corky a Troll …?

          I find popularity an interesting subject. The popularity of DM is an expression of the consciousness of some [fairly large] cohort of the population …

          In that sense, if they’re Trolls, I find them almost indistinguishable from pro-apartheid Trolls or pro-White-Rhodesia Trolls …

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popularity

          • Missy

             /  March 12, 2017

            “Sorry Missy … I don’t get it … are you calling Corky a Troll …?”

            I do not believe you are that obtuse Parti, so stop being deliberately so.

            “In that sense, if they’re Trolls, I find them almost indistinguishable from pro-apartheid Trolls or pro-White-Rhodesia Trolls …”

            Just as I find them almost indistinguishable from anti white and anti Government trolls…..

          • “If A & B are opposed and you say you oppose A, you are therefore saying you agree with and support B” … ? I’m not sure of the veracity of this, although I no doubt do it too …

            “If you’re not with us you’re against us”

            “If you are not my friend you are my enemy”

            Seriously … “anti-government” … and you are what … anti-opposition?

          • Corky

             /  March 12, 2017

            Crikey, this is disturbing…me a troll..no!!! If you believe that you believe London is calling.

    • Nelly Smickers

       /  March 12, 2017

      That poor woman kneeling there might be used to it, Corks…….Wayne reckons she’s already been hit with the *ugly-stick* a few times anyway XD

      • Corky

         /  March 12, 2017

        What worries me is not the whippings, but the whipping of Buddhists. That’s an escalation of Sharia law starting to encompass non Muslims. The West has been given ample warning.
        Will they heed it? No way.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  March 12, 2017

          Wayne reckons a lot of things, not based upon anything.

          • Nelly Smickers

             /  March 12, 2017

            Do you *always* have to be so nasty about people, Kitzy ❓

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  March 12, 2017

        I’d make Wayne wash his own pyjamas for that comment, Nelly.

        • Nelly Smickers

           /  March 12, 2017

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  March 12, 2017

            Not unless Wayne gets around in drag.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  March 12, 2017

              I am still wondering if Wayne’s comments are really his-assuming that he exists-and not made by Mrs Wayne but attributed to him so as to not look as if she is a racist, bigot,or whatever the comment of the day suggests that the maker is.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  March 12, 2017

              I suspect if Wayne knew what he’d said, he’d sue.

            • Gezza

               /  March 12, 2017

              I’m sure Wayne is every bit as real as Shez The Sinner. 👍

  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  March 12, 2017

    Is there a non-European ruled country anywhere that you would prefer to live in, PZ?

    • No Alan, because its no longer about EITHER European OR Indigenous rule … In case you missed that brief era of history called decolonisation … and in case your not aware of the concept of biculturalism … partnership … and power-sharing …

      The greatest hope in the world of successful consociational democracy lies right here in Aotearoa New Zealand …

      Canada has a rudimentary version of it … except the two parties are both colonisers …

      “Consociational theory suggests that power-sharing institutions have many important consequences, not least that they are most likely to facilitate accommodation and cooperation among leadership elites, making them most suitable for states struggling to achieve stable democracy and good governance in divided societies.

      This study compares a broad cross-section of countries worldwide, including many multi-ethnic states … ”

      – synopsis from
      https://www.hks.harvard.edu/fs/pnorris/Acrobat/Powersharing%20solutions.pdf

      I might just add … pathetic question Alan …

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  March 12, 2017

        No it isn’t. It has elucidated the fact you think NZ has done the best job in the whole world of implementing a good democracy. You just have omitted to thank colonialism and neo-liberalism for their good work.

        • More BS “wordplay” Alan … “Because you didn’t say A you must therefore mean A”

          CRAP!

          I said Aotearoa NZ has the best hope … the greatest chance of creating a workable consociational democracy …

          Whether or not we’ll have one is already decided in the affirmative IMHO … a forgone conclusion since the signing of Te Tiriti … itself arguably a Constitutional consociation agreement … kawantanga (governorship) and te tino rangatiratanga (chieftainship) together …

          Because it could have done so much better, the best I can do is acknowledge the role colonisation has played … After all, we wouldn’t be talking about partnership and power-sharing and biculturalism if not for colonisation … and neoliberalism obviously can’t be forgotten … though I’ve forgotten how many times I’ve wished it could …

          • It’s 41 pages long but the harvard.edu article linked above is getting really interesting … and very relevant to Aotearoa New Zealand as we discuss a written Constitution and the place of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in our Constitution …

            “Consociationalism is designed to produce a stable political system due to elite cooperation despite social segmentation.

            In his early work, Lijphart identified four characteristics of ‘consociational’ constitutions as an ideal-type:
            1) executive power-sharing among a ‘grand coalition’ of political leaders drawn from all significant segments of society.
            2) a minority veto in government decision-making, requiring mutual agreement among all parties in the executive.
            3) proportional representation of major groups in elected and appointed office. 4) a high degree of cultural autonomy for groups.”

            • Okay, forget “really interesting”, this is f*%king fascinating –

              “These arrangements are thought to have several benefits over majority rule, generating ‘kinder, gentler’ governance with more inclusive processes of decision-making, more egalitarian policy outcomes, and better economic performance. But the potential advantages of power-sharing institutions are nowhere more important for good governance, it is suggested, than in segmented societies …”

              Bingo!

      • Gezza

         /  March 13, 2017

        Sometimes the best thing to do with pages of intellectual wankery is to ignore the volumes of pointless waffling & cut straight to the conclusions. Doing that here makes it clear the discussion is about the usefulness or otherwise of this particular ism for societies riven with ethnic conflicts. And it concludes thus:

        “Consociationalism can be regarded as, at minimum, the realistic perspective, representing the necessary conditions to secure peace-agreements and negotiated settlements among all parties81. Whether it also serves the long-term interests of democratic consolidation and durable conflict management, however, remains less clear. Despite the political importance of establishing clear-cut guidelines for crafting new constitutions, the cross-national evidence available to compare the performance of majoritarian and consensus democracies on the management of ethnic conflict remains limited.

        The results of this study indicate three major conclusions. First, the global comparison and classification of electoral systems and federalism indicated that power-sharing constitutions combining both PR and federalism are relatively rare, constituting only 13 out of 191 states (7%). While classic cases such as Belgium, Austria, and the Netherlands are well known, they are atypical of constitutional arrangements and power-concentrating regimes remain far more common, with majoritarian electoral systems and unitary states. Secondly, almost no significant links were found between federal states and any of the selected indicators of good governance; while there is a clear logic why territorial autonomy may lead towards the peaceful resolution of ethnic conflict for territorially-concentrated minorities, the evidence does not confirm this theory, and there are also good reasons why federations and decentralized unions may exacerbate ethnic identities and community tensions.

        Lastly the global comparison suggests that even after controlling for levels of human development and other related factors, proportional representation electoral systems are significantly associated with contemporary levels of democratization as well as with indicators of participation and inclusiveness in government, both in all nations under comparison as well as in linguistically heterogeneous societies.

        This provides strictly limited support for the larger claims made by consociational theory. Nevertheless in the analysis, human development clearly emerged as the more reliable and consistent route to good governance rather than constitutional design.

        As discussed fully elsewhere, political institutions still matter in many important regards, such as the impact of electoral systems on party competition, electoral proportionality, and political representation82. We should certainly not ‘throw the baby out with the bathwater’ by concluding the social development is the only factor influencing the process of democratization and that constitutional designs are irrelevant. But the evidence reviewed here suggests that, contrary to the core claim about consensus democracy, power-sharing arrangements are not automatically better for encouraging political stability, voice and accountability, and government effectiveness in plural societies. The broader lessons for domestic policymakers and for the international community is that focusing upon encouraging the underlying conditions conducive for the development of human capital and economic growth, for example by investing in schools, basic health care, fair trade, and debt relief in divided societies in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, is probably a more reliable route towards good governance, rather than placing too much faith in constitutional engineering alone. If policymakers take this evidence to heart, it strongly suggests that to achieve good governance and democracy around the world, for example in Afghanistan and Iraq, building effective and legitimate political institutions is not irrelevant, but if the choice is exporting ‘guns’, ‘butter’, or ‘laws’, priority should probably be given to basic human development.

        • How does it constitute “intellectual wankery” Gezza?

          ” … building effective and legitimate political institutions is not irrelevant, but if the choice is exporting ‘guns’, ‘butter’, or ‘laws’, priority should probably be given to basic human development.”

          I’m sure it says “not irrelevant” …?

          Clearly in Aotearoa New Zealand the choice ISN’T exporting ‘guns’, ‘butter’ or ‘laws’ … I doubt if choices are that singular or binary in any modern society … We do many things at the same time …

          Also, “While classic cases such as Belgium, Austria, and the Netherlands are well known, they are atypical of constitutional arrangements and power-concentrating regimes remain far more common, with majoritarian electoral systems and unitary states.”

          Where does Aotearoa NZ sit along this [implied] continuum do you think?

          • Gezza

             /  March 13, 2017

            It’s all in their conclusion PZ. The rest of what you are talking about founders on the idea this country is somehow so riven it needs a completely different political system. Basically, it doesn’t.

  6. Corky

     /  March 12, 2017

    From April 1st…new Powerball jackpot, 1st divison prize, can grow to $50 million. I can see madness ensuing as socialists go crazy trying to win this blatantly Capitalist game.
    The other socialists will be whining its too big for any one person to have…what would they do with all that money?

    Well, lets see. Mansion in Auckland ( 13 mil), new McLaren sports car ( 1.5 mill) ,mansion in Queenstown ( 5 mil) ,overseas mansion ( 10 mill), Investments earning capital for upkeep of the mansions. Money all gone.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  March 12, 2017

      I would never spend it on those things-not for one person-and if a house needs that amount of upkeep, it must be a lemon.

      I would keep enough for a nice lifestyle- good house, travel, live theatre-and donate the rest. They might as well have it now.

      The people who haven’t come near me since I was a widow wouldn’t get anything.

      • Corky

         /  March 12, 2017

        ”Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.”

        The main thing is you didn’t whine about $ 50 million being too much. You can never have too much. As you say, you can always donate it to where you think it will do the most good.

        For myself, our local rescue helicopter would be upgraded. Two new ambulances for St John.
        And major upgrades in equipment for optometry and anaesthetics at my hospital- major advances have been made in these areas. Psst…but I would be naughty. I would smuggle in a Barrett Sniper rifle. One of my properties has a feral goat and the odd feral dog problem. That Barret would be barking every day. Incidentally, you will be pleased to know the rifle is made by the Barrett Family: Mum Dad and the kids…good conservative people. I call it ”ethical killin”

        • Nelly Smickers

           /  March 12, 2017

          Me and Wayne have often discussed what we’d do if we struck the *really* big one……as he sez, “We’d tell no bastard, spend up large on ourselves, and *give nothing* to no one. Let them buy their own tickets”

          And I fully agree….because deep down, I reckon that’s exactly what most people would do XD

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  March 12, 2017

          My charities would be …

          Hospice (I might ask that something be named for my husband, and if I pranced in with a few million they could hardly say no)

          Yes, a new ambulance or two would be good. The people who took him to hospital couldn’t have been kinder. He had bladder cancer and had wet himself as he lay on the floor-they’ll have seen that innumerable times before, but it’s no less shaming for the person. The man (who was someone we knew) was quite matter of fact about about helping him to change as if it was nothing. St John would definitely have a nice chunk of the winnings. I see names on ambulances-a great memorial, and one that might inspire other people to leave them money.

          Fred Hollows would have some-a nice lot.

          Red Cross ditto.

          SPCA

          They’d be the main ones.

          The dog would still have his old lead, not a gold-plated one, and eat his little casseroles that he has now off his old bowls. I like most of the furniture that I have now, it’s retro, but some more bookcases, good strong ones would be bought. I never, ever have enough. New ones are bought and there are still books lying on and in front of books-there never seems to be any more space & I can’t understand WHY. I’d pay someone to count the books and work out the new shelves that would be needed-and move the books into their new homes.

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  March 12, 2017

          A wealthy guy I knew said the main change would be better stuff in the fridge. I think he’s right. Material stuff doesn’t attract me. Doing and making things is what I enjoy.

          • Gezza

             /  March 13, 2017

            Running down progressive liberals & ‘socialists’ & talking up Trump is what you enjoy Al. The rest is just time-filling these days – isn’t it? 😳

  7. Corky

     /  March 12, 2017

    Didn’t read the blurp properly:

    New prices and Dip options for
    Lotto and Powerball

    The price of Lotto is increasing 10c per line (to 70c) and the price of Powerball is increasing 20c per line (to 80c), bringing the total cost of a line of Lotto and Powerball to $1.50. There will be a new range of Dip options for you to choose from, with something to suit everyone.

    Nudding for nudding.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  March 12, 2017

      Of course not, except with the lottery prizes that one wins without buying a ticket and is notified of this win via email.

      Nobody’s obliged to buy a Lotto ticket.

      I buy the cheapest one-if I am meant to win, I will.

    • I could socialize that game easy as pye Corky … Easy as Stalin was always gonna win the war the moment the Soviets started using female fighter & bomber pilots –

      Just let the increased jackpot amounts progressively filter down through the divisions much earlier … basically what happens now when it reaches $40 million soon $50 million but at lesser amounts … with random ‘must win’ bonus draws ….

      Demand would skyrocket …. so there’d need to be tougher responsible gambling provisions … and more people would win with every win …

      Lotto as it is is a game modelled on feudalism … which models feudalism …

      • Corky

         /  March 12, 2017

        Geez, Parti…I tap out. If I ever become the dictator of Aotearoa, expect a knock at the door.

        • Why … aren’t you gonna have Freedom of Speech in your Dictator State Corky …?

          Its an incredibly simple concept feudalism Corks old son … the great many pay the very few … An infintisimally small number of the many win … The rest go begging to the very few for charity … and a slightly larger number of them are ‘granted’ it …

          Something has to happen to you before you realise this is so ancient its imbued in your DNA … but Lotto never looks the same when you realise that every draw thousands could receive meaningful sums of money …

          Expect a booby trap at the door Corky …

          • Gezza

             /  March 13, 2017

            Feudalism = Lotto is a bit of a stretch, PZ.

  8. Maggy Wassilieff

     /  March 12, 2017

    On 10 March P.G. linked to a very edited/biased view of what the EPA chieff Scott Pruitt actually said about CO2 and global warming.
    https://yournz.org/2017/03/10/epa-chief-contradicts-epa-science/#comments

    Here’s another take on the matter….
    https://judithcurry.com/2017/03/11/scott-pruitts-statement-on-climate-change/

  9. lurcher1948

     /  March 12, 2017

    How can it be i watched billy the catholic and nick the alternative truth smith speak on tv saying all rivers are safe to swim and fish in??then just now on prime news children are fishing for salmon in an enclosed lake freshly stocked with salmon as most rivers are ruined or dry due to the filthy cow poo farmers killing nature,so does these mean Bill English is your typical lying national party pm, sad really and I’m not going to mention NATIONAL arse licking iran a terrorist nation to sell them some sheep meat.YOU FELT GOOD BAD MOUTHING ISRAEL in the un for that meat deal McCully and English didn’t you just saying …its the truth and ISRAEL has gone but sharia law is coming soon

    • Gezza

       /  March 13, 2017

      I don’t think you’ve got too many worries re Israel Lurch. Trumpy in his ignorance and susceptibility to base flattery has let Bibi quietly slip his finger up & massage his prostate without noticing so that he’s blthely doing Bibi’s bidding while thinking he’s actually calling the shots. Didn’t you notice Bibi smarming & smirking away at how easy it was when he was up there with The DOTUS talking about what a lovely boy Jarred has always been?

  10. lurcher1948

     /  March 12, 2017

    I see billy the catholic is upset at the abortion law,he could have a direct line to the pope i reckon.
    I didn’t vote this dufus, or key so New Zealanders shouldn’t have to put up with billy from dipton and have a vote for a new leader, its called democracy

    • Gezza

       /  March 13, 2017

      What are you blithering about? Do you got a link, as the yanks say?

  11. PDB

     /  March 12, 2017

    James Taylor born this day in history (1948)…………….”He was a heroin addict and a psychiatric patient in his teens, and his narcotic dependency fueled the ultimate failure of perhaps America’s favorite celebrity music marriage of the 1970s, Taylor’s to Carly Simon. He finally got sober in his mid-30s, but will never forget his addicted past, “somehow I haven’t died,” he says. In many ways Taylor still is that former self, the James who almost didn’t make it: the man whose friend and fellow sybarite John Belushi let it be known that he was worried for him, a comment put into sharp relief by Belushi’s own fatal overdose soon afterwards in 1982. That was the wake-up call Taylor needed.”

    http://score.addicaid.com/james-taylors-recovery-from-heroin-addiction/

  12. Pickled Possum

     /  March 12, 2017

    James Taylor donned Dallas Cowboys attire to announce that he and Bonnie Raitt will play the first pop concert held at the Ford Center at The Star in Frisco on July 31, 2017.
    Love Taylor King 1971 … the best version

    Good One PDB

  13. Really!? Is it 10 to 10pm!

    “According to Talcott Parsons … there are four main types of culture : marked by love/hate (Middle East, Mediterranean, Latin America) approval/criticism (United Kingdom, Canada, Scandinavia, Germanic countries) esteem/contempt (Japan, Eastern Asia). The last one, responsiveness/rejection, is typical for the United States.” – Wiki

    No-one seems to think much about popularity. Of interest and relevance on Wikipedia is, Neuroimaging identifies the anterior insula and anterior cingulate as key areas in the brain determining whether people prefer something in regard to its being popular with their peer group. The influence of one’s peer group is strongest during adolescence.

  14. To make these delicious PartisanZ ‘Woodland Hideout’ pancakes you’ll need …

    1/2 cup Partisanz Flax oil
    1/2 cup of Partisanz Cabbage Tree Flour
    A pinch of PartisanZ rubbed Willow Bark seasoning
    9 Organic Free-Range PartisanZ eggs …
    PartisanZ Raw Bush Honey and PartisanZ Tamarillo Syrup to taste …
    PartisanZ Smokeless Fire-Making instructions …

    • Gezza

       /  March 13, 2017

      Woodland hideout? Uggers might be interested. Waiting to see if he emerges from his bunker to place an order PZ.